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29

I'm sure that someone has an example of this working, but I haven't seen it. I've worked in a Fortune 500 company for many years where they outsourced alot of development. I don't have a single example in those years of an outsourced project costing less than if we had done it ourselves (in-house). While their programming rates were less than ours, we ...


26

An in-house team will be more responsive to your needs, since they're actually part of your company, so they have a better idea of what you want. An in-house team is easier to communicate with- nothing beats regular face-to-face contact. Your in-house team will have more domain-specific knowledge that an external team would have to learn. You're investing ...


23

You can have quickly, you can have it cheaply, or you can have it done well. You can't have all three, and I would argue that even two out of three can be a stretch.


22

"Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all others because you were born in it" - George Bernard Shaw People are people and people starving in India should be no worse or better than anywhere else. If your company fails because your not going with the best option you're not helping anyone. If the options are equal feel free ...


18

Tough question. Luckily I'm not in a position where I have to make such decisions. To me the country I live in (Germany) has only a very abstract, nearly virtual meaning. It's borders where historically created by a series of random events, more often than not based on the decision of one robber (later to be called aristocrats) to invade his neighbor. So my ...


17

Short Version: Pick the one you're best at, and polish your skills and CV till they glow. Even if SysAdmin is more stable than Programmer, great Programmer is more stable than Lousy SysAdmin. Long version: Couple of caveats: No job's secure unless you perform well at it There's not a job in existence that some idiot won't try to outsource. Hell, Britain ...


17

I needed it properly done Then don't outsource it, or if you do then make sure they work in your project team and that you participate in code reviews at the time. The project completed after 3 weeks and they delivered what was needed. At that point I started to review the code. Again, you should have been reviewing code during the project, not ...


17

I see two good possible approaches to to this problem. However, it's important to realize two things. First, requirements engineering is hard work - turning an idea into a formal specification that is enough to build a system takes a lot of time, effort, and practice. Second, if you have good requirements (in any format, from a formal specification to less ...


17

Based on that interaction we had in the comments, I'll go with the assumption that you didn't drive your only developer away because of personal things. However, basing on that conversation, I'll make another guess that this setback is still mostly your responsibility as a hiring manager. As you mentioned you don't have AT ALL any experience with ...


16

Make sure there are all possible means of comunication (phone, instant messengers, remote connectivity tools) available. A direct phone line to communicate, well, directly to someone, but also to make sure that the recipient does exist and did get the message. (An email with a return receipt is not an alternative) An instant messaging tool to communicate ...


14

Use the Right Tool for the Job Loyalty and patriotism are irrelevant - and be suspicious of people that use such arguments to get you to change your business decisions, chances are they are just trying to sell you something! My company does not offshore. Not because there aren't fantastic programmers in other countries, but because we prefer to 'keep it ...


14

This is a strange situation, and I'm quite sure you're not telling the whole story. I worked with many people, some of who left for various reasons (me being their colleague), but don't try to tell us that everything was super good and one day just no contact. But that's not problem. At least not anymore; you should learn from your mistake and try not to ...


13

For a software company, this is just plain stupid. The closest they could get to a reasonably intelligent decision would be to move the company to another location that has cheaper talent. A software company outsourcing their software development isn't a software company anymore. I would argue that any gains earned will be short-lived, because you are ...


12

First off this is not an issue of off shoring, it’s a vendor management issue Yes, you made ALOT of mistakes… They did what was needed but I needed it properly done, and hence the changes. was I really unfair? Yes, it is fair, If you wanted it done a certain way you should have said that before the price was agreed to, so they can bid accordingly. ...


11

My only experience of outsourcing to a company in another country will be my last. The company hired failed to complete their work on time or even remotely meet the specifications, and resulted in us having to redo the whole lot again in-house. However, if you can find a reliable company you can trust (i.e. you've seen/heard good things about them from ...


11

If the software is to be used tactically or strategically or is core to your business, then having programmers who also understand the business can be key. They also need to understand the support and life cycle and what will cost your company to support the systems after release. I don't think that cost is generally a real factor. If someone claims it ...


10

I would recommend against this for one main reason that has nothing to do with the competence and capability of the particular outsourcing firm which has approached you (which I can't judge). For QA to work, once you get past the `developers do their own QA' stage, it needs to be a first-class member of your planning and management process. By nature, ...


9

It is all about communication. Defining the problem and acceptance criteria and accurately communicating them is the key. This leads to piece work or project work, but not a mix unless the contractors are senior people that you have worked with before and the problem is well understood by everyone involved. The main problems I have had in the past were ...


9

You should measure the developer's productivity by how well they solve your problems. Ask the developer to give an estimate for how long a new feature or bug fix will take. Ask yourself whether it's worth having them fix it based on their estimate. If it's worth it, and they finish in more or less the time that they estimated, they were productive. ...


9

Documenting code afterwards by another programmer? It is merely my own experience and opinion to tell you should not take that path. Without more detailed knowledge of the quality of that code base, my opinion is that your best approach is to hire a new programmer to fix the bugs, maintain and possibly make modifications you require. That opinion has the ...


8

Check out the following sites: oDesk eLance scriptlance vWorker (originally rent a coder) Rent A Coder Code Monkey For Hire FreeLancer I know someone that reasonable success with oDesk.


8

I don't think it is the right way to go. As you note, explaining the requirements and the current state of the code would already take a lot of your time. Put next to it the time required to understand and discuss the reviewer's findings, and do the fixes in the code. Moreover, how do you know that the reviewer is up to the task? And how do you ensure that ...


7

Yes - you get what you pay for. In my experience, unless your market and development needs are so dead simple they can easily be explained via email to any developer with a possible language barrier, and so dead simple that even a developer who isn't really invested in the company can still succeed at creating a quality product, then yes your product will ...


7

You must define performance metrics and goals that they must meet. If you were doing any type of Agile and/or SCRUM then you wouldn't have this problem. There are many free applications to help with this. Rally (rallydev.com) is a great one (not free!!) Set time lines and goals and hold them to it. Seems like you need to apply basic managerial skills. If ...


7

The director wants to replace some of his experienced local developers with people in a distant country whose expertise he's not competent to judge, who have no experience with the code at all, and who can't be directly supervised or mentored by anybody who does know the code. I've been through that twice. In both cases, the inexpensive foreign firms failed ...


7

That needs to be considered when the project starts but there is no fixed answer, it will vary from company to company and project to project. If there is an in-house team it can be handed over to them to support and enhance on an on-going basis. Obviously the issues with this are the issues with any handover to people who weren't involved from the ...


7

Getting legal help is a given. There are lawyers who specialize in IP and I would suggest that they might be the best people to enlist. Your local law society should be able to give you a list of suitable candidates. That said, unless you have the money to enforce any NDA you make people sign it's all rather moot isn't it? Also, if you offshore ...


7

3rd party vendors have to be held to the same standards that in-house would be. That should include qa testing, it should include performance specs that they have to meet. And it should include consequesnces for failure. The best solution is to document the problems and ask management to fire them. That's what we did when we outsourced something and they ...



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