Hot answers tagged

19

Up-Front + Milestones Typically, you should have some payment up-front to begin work. Then, have milestones where you deliver some part of the project to them, or show an update to progress where the next payment is due. This way you have the incentive to keep working on the project, because you don't get paid the full amount until you deliver, and they ...


14

If it's directly for work, unless there's an understanding otherwise, the company should absolutely pay for it. It doesn't matter if it's all day for two weeks, if that's a reasonable amount of time to learn the framework. If the company hires a programmer with the understanding that they don't already have that skill, the company, generally, should pay for ...


10

I ask clients to pay 50% up front and 50% when the project is complete and I have given it to them. I have lost a lot of money in the past when clients suddenly pull out and I have not gotten anything off them up front. With the 50% up front you know you can trust them and it will cover your development costs. They will also feel happy that you won't get ...


5

If the company requested/asked you to learn the Framework, then there is no question of being unethical to spend entire working day learning it. However, you should be aggressive to get a grasp of it fast so you can start to develop production code as early as possible. Since you are involved in a Startup with only two of you as programmer, for the benefit ...


4

This process is known as authorization & capture and is used by most major payment gateways, including PayPal and Amazon (Amazon refer to it as delayed order fulfillment or Reserve action). PayPal on authorization and capture Amazon on the Reserve action in their API


3

two sane options if you're flat-bidding the work, or the cost of an iteration, half in advance and half on completion. For your own protection, insist that acceptance tests be objective and automated. if you're working by the hour, sell pre-paid hours


2

You can also use an online escrow site (which might be more appropriate for you). Warning - if you do use an escrow or payment site, only ever use a Government registered site (there are unregistered scam escrow and payment sites out there).


2

PayPal has a number of tutorials/demos on how to integrate with their system, with examples in PHP, Java and ASP.NET. You can use their shopping cart buttons, or interface with third-party ones. Here are a couple of books on the subject: PayPal APIs: Up and Running: A Developer's Guide by Michael Balderas (to be plublished March 7, 2011) Effortless ...


2

I currently get paid by Google every week day (Monday - Friday), assuming I've actually earned some money. It takes >24 hours for a new order to be charged to the customer's card, so that money is not paid immediately. Once Google sends the payment it takes 3 days on average until it appears in the bank. There is no minimum threshold for payment. If I've ...


2

After a bit of researching, I found this: Payments for successfully processed orders are sent for disbursal to your account within two business days. However, the actual payout for your Google Checkout account will be initiated as per the applicable payout schedule for your account. Once the payout is disbursed to the bank account you ...


2

It's totally legit though you should also be making some progress. In my opinion you should also be spending some home time furthering your skills. You can't expect your employer to pick up the entire bill for your self-education.


1

I don't know if there is a standard for this, it's pretty rare, but I've seen either hourly or fixed price (I suggest hourly if they offer - you won't spend your time arguing about what was included in the price), but at a lower rate to make up for the IP. Also I've seen giving the client a percentage of revenue from the software for a while, to give them ...


1

Of course it's ethical to study and learn a new framework when you're on the clock. You might spend some of your own time on it, but your employer must expect that you need some time to research things at work. I run a web development team and I give all members 5 hours a week - an hour a day - for independent research and self learning. I know what they ...


1

Yes, you should. If you didn't lie and claimed to know the framework already, then there's nothing wrong with "on the job training". You should supplement it if you can, but there's nothing wrong here. This used to be the normal way of doing things in software development - you would be paid to constantly learn new things, not expected to know everything ...


1

Would you be paid the higher hourly rates of freelance contract work or just 'normal' hourly rates? I have agreed in one company to a lower starting salary for the first three months once, since I wanted the job and had a personal interest in acquiring the necessary skills. But if you have just a normal job, it is quite common to spend some time learning ...


1

It's always a risk if you don't get paid first or at least a percentage of what is agreed. Be strict and always ask a down payment first, especially if you can't trust the employer. It's your right to ask for it. Don't worry about it. A written contract would also be helpful. It establishes that it is a professional business and it also sets the limitations ...


1

I don't know if anything like this exists, but perhaps go the middle ground.. Have a middle tier account where the payment is paid, so that the money is now in limbo.. you know that the money is available, and they know you won't run off with it. Then inside that freedom you can work out any appropriate milestone payments on a per-project basis.


1

I use PayPal for a shareware program I have been selling online since 2003. They have a number of ways you can integrate their system with your website, so that after a customer has clicked on a Buy button on your website, and then paid through PayPal (whether they have a PayPal account or not -- they can always use a credit card), then they get sent back ...



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