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14

It was written using WPF, so that would be XAML and (most likely) C#. Wikipedia just states: The IDE shell has been rewritten using the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), whereas the internals have been redesigned using Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF) which doesn't help with the non XAML part. I suspect that there will be C++ elements in ...


13

Mylyn is a very widely appreciated plugin for Eclipse, and is available on the main Eclipse site now. It can watch the pieces of code that you work on together (for example, when changing "tax calculation" code, you tend to use the same five files) and then emphasize them the next time you work on the same task. It's a great way to undo the "information ...


12

The main difference between a hook and event is loose coupling versus tight coupling. A hook is a generic way to broadcast that something has happened. You can add new hooks without having to recompile plugins, and all hooks follow a generic design pattern. Once the hook API is defined it doesn't change so the coupling between the app and plugin isn't ...


11

It kinda depends on your platform but some general things to keep in mind Versioning What happens if you update your application, does all old plugins become obsolete (the firefox problem) Isolation Can plugins do whatever they want? Do you always trust them? Or do you need to run them in some sort of sandbox and request permissions. Updates How do you ...


9

I think the main reason is that browser extensions aren't monetised. That means that people dont expect to pay for their browser extensions and so they aren't likely to want to. For a browser extension to be worth money, it would have to be better than any free equivalent in it's particular domain. I can't think of many regular extensions that I would want ...


8

Check out the "Extend Jenkins" page: https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/Extend+Jenkins Specifically, take a look at the tutorial here: https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/Plugin+tutorial The configuration/options views are placed in src/main/resources, as described in the Plugin Workspace Layout section. If you run into specific ...


7

I wouldn't even think of doing it. For one thing most people will already have a copy of the jQuery framework included in their app if they're using jQuery plugins, which means that you're both loading it twice (making http requests slower) and exposed to possible conflict problems. For another thing, oftentimes people use things like Google's API or ...


7

Initially I was of two minds on this one: Only by having each plugin include its own version of jQuery can you be certain of the right rev. You are so not in control of your project if you allow random people (including past versions of yourself) to determine your page-weight or introduce arbitrary/unknown/unknowable weirdities into your code. #2 makes ...


7

I faced a similar problem, and I'll tell you how I went about resolving it. Firstly, there is a "core" library, or engine. This basically runs the show, much as you have already got figured out. It handles things common to every system, from rendering forms dynamical, user and account management, roles, you name it, it does it. Every part of the system ...


7

If you have little time to complete a project, it's a good idea to use third-party code. The only thing is to understand how it works (in the level of interfaces) in order to use it correctly and not to get any "surprises". The most rational approach, I think, is to use the third-party code and complete your project. If after that you have time left, you ...


6

You can find all informations about API and extension structure in http://code.google.com/chrome/extensions/index.html website. You can write extensions using only HTML, CSS, JS. There are also some sample extensions in this site. Moreover, you can unzip any extension that you want to check source codes.


6

What is the best process for creating an API that is intuitive and easy to learn? First, create an API that works. Then, after using it for a while, get feedback on the parts that are not intuitive or easy to learn. Third, rewrite the API to be more intuitive and easier to learn. Then, after using the revised API for a while, get more feedback on the ...


6

Clover - A test coverage tool, but outputs the most lovely reports in the world (costs a pretty penny thou.) Crap4J - Same general data as Clover (that is to say it is a code coverage tool) but simplified and less pretty (free). Findbugs - Reports on common coding errors (free). All can be used as either an Eclipse plugin or a stand alone application.


6

It's probably largely historical. Most apps for most phones were distributed primarily via carriers for quite a while, and they've monetized virtually everything since day one. Even most ring-tones cost money (often twice over -- pay once for the ring-tone proper, and again for downloading it). Contrariwise, pretty much since Microsoft decided to start ...


6

I think it has a lot to do with payments infrastructure. Apple's iStore has a well set up near monopoly on iPhone app delivery. Its slick has lots of high value desirable items like tunes and movies as well as applications and the consumer only has to go through the pain of registration and credit card details once. Apple accounts for the vast majority of ...


5

I wrote this Code Project article about using MEF for extensibility in .NET. It's a good introduction. There are other extensibility frameworks for .NET, such as SharpDevelop's Add-in Architecture, Mono.Addins and System.AddIn. For Java, there is the Eclipse Plug-in Architecture. The general pattern is this: You define a contract (normally an ...


5

GPL: You must provide full source code if you are providing compiled form. If you are not providing compiled form, you still can provide the source in full or any part of it. You must attach the license notice to it. I.e. even if you take few functions out of a source file, you have to put the copyright notice from the beginning of the original source ...


5

Wow that's a really tough question and to be honest there is no right or wrong answer. Almost every programmer has their own way of programming and therefore learning/improving their skills. I would say there are mainly four different stages in learning how to code and when/why you have to use modules/plugins/frameworks: If you are at the very beginning of ...


5

Disclaimer: talk to an attorney. I am not an attorney. You are contemplating the need to be able to dual-license your software someday down the road. The authority to licence something is derived (directly or indirectly) through owning the copyright to the materials. Therefore, you NEED to get copyright assignments from all contributors, or at a minimum, ...


4

Much of the interface of Visual Studio 2010 was written using WPF (C# and XAML), but they had so much good working code already built in C++ (I think I remember hearing that a good portion of Intellisense is still in C++, but I may be wrong) that they kept and built on top of. Check out Snoop to take a peek at the internals of the interface. You can learn ...


4

Resharper has the stack trace explorer. And if you follow this post the copying and pasting is done automatically. Hope this helps


4

You could look at http://www.odesk.com, where you can hire a freelance developer anywhere in the world. There are tools that help protect both you and the freelancer, and you can read the feedback from other employers about the freelancer and feedback from freelancers about the employer, which gives you insight into who you would be hiring.


4

Having lots of versioning logic and layers of code to manage isn't adding value to your web app / site. It also requires more brain power to understand what is going on and distracts you from the core of what you are doing. I advise differently. I advise to keep things simple over complex. Maintain a single code base that is the same for everyone. Every ...


4

From the blog post that explains what happened to the plugin repository: We recognize that the old site was still serving as an regular resource for a lot of people, especially newer jQuery users, who simply valued the existence of a central browsing location, despite its flaws. Though many experienced users had moved on to other sites, or relied on ...


4

Look at the service locator in java. One of the main classes is java.util.ServiceLoader. It basically searches for a file named as an interface and loads the class named in this file. This is the standard way to load classes dynamically as plug-in.


4

Jan's answer gives what you can do according to the various licenses. But I think you may have another option depending on exactly how you tend to use the code in your blog and how much of it. US (and many other contries) copyright law contains a fair use clause. If you are providing commentary or critique of the code the fair use would give you the right ...


4

If you need to get a job done (and your final project probably counts as "a job" in that context) then the approach I tend to use is to write the code that is crucial to the problem at hand and use libraries where it saves me time and isn't core to the problem. For example importing a CSV file can be a surprisingly complex problem to solve properly, if you ...


4

The plugin usually specifies a default behavior and also accepts a selector, e.g: jQuery().selectOptions() // default selector 'select' jQuery( '.selectOptions' ).selectOptions() // Custom selector, gives the user more control. I would not recommend automatically executing under any circumstances.


4

No, exceptions are never the right tool for normal flow control. Exceptions should only be used to indicate that a function/method can't fulfil its contract due to external reasons. In the case of your CanFireEvent method, the function name clearly suggests a yes/no answer and thus a boolean return value, but the second alternative (where the 'No' gets ...


3

You may find subclipse a very handy plugin; it makes it very intuitive whether there's changes to be committed or not. Another suggestion is don't look for more plugins, look into eclipse itself because the features it provides, such as refatoring and source generating, is really very enough for everyday java programming. I have switched from C++ to Java ...



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