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5

Is there still any functional programming language that doesn't rely on C runtime? Yes, at least if you consider (like I do) that Lisp variants are functional languages (because they have the application and abstraction operators of the lambda-calculus), and that any language with closures and abstraction is functional: Bones is an implementation of ...


5

Most languages in common use are more powerful and better designed than JavaScript. All the features you mention are supported by other dynamic languages like Python or Ruby which are overall better designed. And some of the features you mention are not necessarily desirable anyway - many would consider static typing with type inference preferable to dynamic ...


5

I've created a few low level networking programs in c#, mainly a protocol stack, and a chat messenger. The only issue I ever had was the overhead that comes along with using a high level language. You can still do all of the low level things like looking at packets, and reading individual bytes. Java & .NET both have built-in support for sockets and byte ...


3

You could compare the properties of 2 or more different languages (support to OO principles, memory utilization, interpreted vs. compiled, support for datatypes, base class libraries, 3rd party tools availability, speed of execution, etc.). However, in practice, for a given project, there are factors, other than the goodness of the language that would cause ...


2

From what you describe, it sounds like you are looking for a potent preprocessor to generate the code that is subsequently compiled. Preprocessors are, of course, almost as old as computer languages themselves, however, most are really limited in extend and syntactic capabilities. Afaik, there are basically two kinds of preprocessors: Non-turing complete ...


2

What you are looking for is called a REPL, a quick search for "C++ REPL" gets you to Cling, but I have not used it. I'm not sure what is the real benefit from using a REPL over to use a debugger with an interface that you are comfortable with. Static typing should help you get the code right before ever running it, also IDE's suggestions become much better ...


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NIM http://nim-lang.org/docs/tut1.html Provides arbitrary compile-time calculations with whole feature set of runtime.


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"I'm really interested in writing my own general-purpose high-level programming language" Are you really? If you are truly interested and want to create your own language complete with a (native) compiler for the experience you would probably be interested on reading up on assembly and how the CPU works, you can examine the assembly output of existing high ...


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To add to the points everyone else has been making, don't forget that there are perfectly good Distributed Version Control Systems (DCVS) that work very well. I personally prefer Mercurial as a .NET developer, but there is an equally strong case for Git as well. There is a really good answer here on the advantages of a DCVS over a traditional CVS system ...



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