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71

This is a symptom of a wider migration towards distributed version control systems. Some websites which traditionally hosted non distributed VCS (eg Codeplex & SourceForge) were a little slow in adding support for DVCS (eg Git or Mercurial). So, people who wanted to use DVCS for their project were forced to migrate their projects over to the providers ...


34

Project hosting is infrastructure. Infrastructure exhibits network effects, which means that infrastructure gets more useful the more people are connected to it. (In particular, the usefulness is O(number_of_connections), which means that for any individual member it is O(total_members) and for the whole system it is O(total_members^2)). This, in turn, leads ...


30

Of course it is OK: it is hard to imagine that over 4,098,118 projects currently hosted on GitHub would all be 100% great and useful! You are not forcing anyone to use your code or even to look at it. If you host the project primarily for yourself, the quality of your code is of concern to you, and nobody else. You listed all the right reasons to host your ...


26

Bitbucket uses mercurial (hg) and provides unlimited private and public repositories. It is free if you're not sharing your projects. Each project may also have a tracker and wiki associated with it (optional). Other than that, the service provides both HTTP and SSH uploads. I use Bitbucket to synchronize and keep personal projects of my own. Since I move ...


20

There is no "start from scratch in a collaborative way" (unless, you're all starting as a team). Linus once put it in a way that always remained stuck in my head. Nobody should start to undertake a large project. You start with a small trivial project, and you should never expect it to get large. If you do, you'll just overdesign and generally think ...


15

I think one of the reasons is different audience: sourceforge is primarily for hosting applications, probably the most prominent feature of a project page is a link to the compiled executable (or some other download). In other words, it's targeted at users, not developers. On the other hand, github is primarily for hosting source code, the most prominent ...


12

I tried starting several projects over the number of years. They ALL failed. The main thing i got out of it was 1) Do all of the work yourself. Everything. Just keep programming and doing it. It sucks no one is helping you but thats how it goes but also 2) Get involve with the community and make occasional post. Like progress every month or so. Tell ...


11

The best place I know of to host a Java Web application is on Google App Engine. It scales really well as it's free for low usage. Once you hit your quotas it's then pay as you go. Most Java Web hosting can cost anywhere from $25 per month and up, but Google App Engine is free to start. Our organization hosts many Web applications and Web sites on ...


11

There's no good, standard, way to evaluate the security of providers like this. Stability you can see, somewhat, but security is pretty much impossible to evaluate from the outside. I'd actually talk to the providers you are considering about their security guarantees, and look at their contracts - if they don't make any guarantees, or if their contracts ...


10

Push whatever you want as early as possible. No one's going to look at it unless you publicise it and it's interesting. If you're really worried, some free code hosting services offer private repositories.


9

I tried that too - the "collaborative design" - when I started making games. The truth is, very few people want to work on design, even if you start with a blank page; they want you to give them explicit, clear and simple tasks they can do without getting too involved. Those who do like designing often have their own projects and just won't work on yours. ...


9

Sourceforge also offers Git, but Github just does it better (for now). Their pull request system works nicely (much better than Gitorious for instance) Their recently-upgraded notification is very convenient. They show the code right away Their killer feature, in my opinion, is the "Network graph": Difference with gitk: it also shows you what is going ...


8

Bitbucket. They provide an excellent service, private repositories in their free package (plus unlimited public) and are pretty responsive in their issue tracker. The same, minus the free private repositories, are true for Github, but I immensely dislike git. That's a personal preference, I'm not advocating against git, if for some weird reason you prefer ...


8

Just start. You are likely to gain collaboration only if you provide the initial momentum. Where you host/find collaborators largely depends on what type of project it is. For example, for a new .NET framework/library, you should probably use CodePlex or GitHub. For something involving GNOME you would likely use either the GNOME infrastructure, or something ...


7

On my machine with Subversion. Backups created and stored on an External HDD (Onsite) Backups emailed to myself in GMAIL then tagged 'xxxx BACKUP' for easier retrieval (Offsite)


7

Why not using a local GIT/SVN repository created within a DropBox (http://www.dropbox.com) directory? This way you will have the plus of a local version control AND the plus of a cloud solution; you can work on different machines and if you're not connected, everything will be resync when you'll go online (you might have to pay some attention to avoid ...


7

The majority actually do have this feature or something similar, as you can see on this comparison chart (Wikipedia). The ones that don't, probably figure that they'd just be reinventing the wheel because, as your question implies, there are already a plethora of free forum packages available. Even many of the project hosts that do provide this, such as ...


7

GitHub is simple, easy-to-use, easy to get started with, powerful and looks great and is Web 2.0-ish. I use GitHub, and I find it remarkably easier to use than SourceForge, which had its power hidden behind a series of menus and required fairly elaborate operations to get anything set up. And I'm a programmer. In addition, I think there is one more ...


6

Kiln from Fogcreek There is a free version that allows for two developers.


6

GitHub is a popular choice. Open-source repositories on GitHub are free.


6

The advantage of a distributed system (Git, Mercurial, Bazaar) is that even if your remote host does disappear completely, you'll still have the full repository history locally, from which you can start again elsewhere. With something like Subversion, if you lose the server you'll only have the working copy, which is better than nothing but means you've ...


6

Why not use GitHub, BitBucket or SourceForge ?


6

First things first: I'm not a lawyer. Depending on the licence you use, these companies may be free to branch your product into either a closed-source project or another open-source competitor (perhaps so they can steer the development). It's always a risk (and a benefit) of using free/open-source licences. However, if you have reason to suspect that your ...


6

We have a closed-source project hosted in such a way. It's pretty widely accepted that stealing source code won't get anyone too far (good article here). bitbucket and github make their living from closed-source, so they have a natural imperative to keep things as secure as they can (and minimize bad press). One note is that every once in a while, the ...


5

As a former host operator (so no, I'm not selling) I would suggest that you'd probably fall foul of the general T&Cs of all reputable hosts. However, I'd suggest contacting some, and explain what you are wanting... assuming they know what's what, you may find them amenable - especially if you pick a smaller company where people lower down the food chain ...


4

Comparing hosting is like comparing dentists: there are plenty to choose from, everyone has a favorite and everyone recommends his/her own. And unfortunately just like with dentists, you need to find yours via trial and error rather than others' recommendations. You can probably start with various reviews and ratings available on the Internet. One ...


4

One option would be to get a Linux virtual server and install the software of your choice on it (that might even let you stick with Oracle products if that's your preference). If that's a little too much setup and administration for you, you could look at using Bitnami's TomStack. (There are some Amazon EC2 Machine Images listed at the bottom - inlcuding ...


4

Whether your project is on Google Code or CodePlex in particular is not the important thing. If the project is open source, and the source is somewhere public-- and ALL of CodePlex, Google Code, Github, Sourceforge, etc. have these qualities-- then people, any people who want to, can come by, download the code, and use it in their own projects. Microsoft ...


4

External services aren't always stable, sometimes they go down. Github has had a lot of bad luck with downtime in the past few months, out for sometimes hours at a time. Code may be private. If you're under an NDA or something to not share code with anyone, that includes employees of external services, that can access code in repositories even after they've ...



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