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69

This is a symptom of a wider migration towards distributed version control systems. Some websites which traditionally hosted non distributed VCS (eg Codeplex & SourceForge) were a little slow in adding support for DVCS (eg Git or Mercurial). So, people who wanted to use DVCS for their project were forced to migrate their projects over to the providers ...


43

GitHub Unlimited free open source repositories. No approval process. Supports the most popular DVCS. Out-of-the-box wikis. Users can download project source without source control installed.


32

Project hosting is infrastructure. Infrastructure exhibits network effects, which means that infrastructure gets more useful the more people are connected to it. (In particular, the usefulness is O(number_of_connections), which means that for any individual member it is O(total_members) and for the whole system it is O(total_members^2)). This, in turn, leads ...


30

Of course it is OK: it is hard to imagine that over 4,098,118 projects currently hosted on GitHub would all be 100% great and useful! You are not forcing anyone to use your code or even to look at it. If you host the project primarily for yourself, the quality of your code is of concern to you, and nobody else. You listed all the right reasons to host your ...


26

Bitbucket uses mercurial (hg) and provides unlimited private and public repositories. It is free if you're not sharing your projects. Each project may also have a tracker and wiki associated with it (optional). Other than that, the service provides both HTTP and SSH uploads. I use Bitbucket to synchronize and keep personal projects of my own. Since I move ...


26

I would recommend this: Don't use SourceForge They have one of the most complicated interfaces I've seen. Whats main navigation tabs are displayed (the ones to view the home page, issue tracker, etc) change randomly (its called a sub tab!). Submitting bug reports is painful. Website is not shown by default. Following email lists if iffy. Many projects with ...


20

There is no "start from scratch in a collaborative way" (unless, you're all starting as a team). Linus once put it in a way that always remained stuck in my head. Nobody should start to undertake a large project. You start with a small trivial project, and you should never expect it to get large. If you do, you'll just overdesign and generally think ...


18

I like bitbucket. I consider Mercurial to be the best source control system out there.


16

I've yet to find one that fit my personal requirements. GitHub is maybe the most interesting in features but I can't use it because I'm using Mercurial. BitBucket isn't as useful as GitHub but at least it now provide both Mercurial and Git repositories. It also allow private repos for free. Google Code is a good alternative to BitBucket but require a ...


15

There are tons of great options depending on your source control of preference. The two I would recommend are Google Code (if you like mercurial or svn) and Github (if you like git). Keep in mind a distributed source control system gives you a lot more flexibility with accepting patches and so on (it makes it trivial for anyone to submit patches) ...


13

I think one of the reasons is different audience: sourceforge is primarily for hosting applications, probably the most prominent feature of a project page is a link to the compiled executable (or some other download). In other words, it's targeted at users, not developers. On the other hand, github is primarily for hosting source code, the most prominent ...


12

I tried starting several projects over the number of years. They ALL failed. The main thing i got out of it was 1) Do all of the work yourself. Everything. Just keep programming and doing it. It sucks no one is helping you but thats how it goes but also 2) Get involve with the community and make occasional post. Like progress every month or so. Tell ...


11

It really depends on what kind of project you have and what the related community uses. So my tip would be to use the one that your community will use. Communities for Linux or Ruby stuff Github (git) Launchpad (for ubuntu stuff, bzr) Communities for Java stuff, Code Igniter PHP, etc. Bitbucket (hg) Google Code (hg and svn) Communities for .NET ...


11

The best place I know of to host a Java Web application is on Google App Engine. It scales really well as it's free for low usage. Once you hit your quotas it's then pay as you go. Most Java Web hosting can cost anywhere from $25 per month and up, but Google App Engine is free to start. Our organization hosts many Web applications and Web sites on ...


11

There's no good, standard, way to evaluate the security of providers like this. Stability you can see, somewhat, but security is pretty much impossible to evaluate from the outside. I'd actually talk to the providers you are considering about their security guarantees, and look at their contracts - if they don't make any guarantees, or if their contracts ...


10

Push whatever you want as early as possible. No one's going to look at it unless you publicise it and it's interesting. If you're really worried, some free code hosting services offer private repositories.


9

I tried that too - the "collaborative design" - when I started making games. The truth is, very few people want to work on design, even if you start with a blank page; they want you to give them explicit, clear and simple tasks they can do without getting too involved. Those who do like designing often have their own projects and just won't work on yours. ...


9

Sourceforge also offers Git, but Github just does it better (for now). Their pull request system works nicely (much better than Gitorious for instance) Their recently-upgraded notification is very convenient. They show the code right away Their killer feature, in my opinion, is the "Network graph": Difference with gitk: it also shows you what is going ...


8

Just start. You are likely to gain collaboration only if you provide the initial momentum. Where you host/find collaborators largely depends on what type of project it is. For example, for a new .NET framework/library, you should probably use CodePlex or GitHub. For something involving GNOME you would likely use either the GNOME infrastructure, or something ...


8

Bitbucket. They provide an excellent service, private repositories in their free package (plus unlimited public) and are pretty responsive in their issue tracker. The same, minus the free private repositories, are true for Github, but I immensely dislike git. That's a personal preference, I'm not advocating against git, if for some weird reason you prefer ...


7

On my machine with Subversion. Backups created and stored on an External HDD (Onsite) Backups emailed to myself in GMAIL then tagged 'xxxx BACKUP' for easier retrieval (Offsite)


7

Why not using a local GIT/SVN repository created within a DropBox (http://www.dropbox.com) directory? This way you will have the plus of a local version control AND the plus of a cloud solution; you can work on different machines and if you're not connected, everything will be resync when you'll go online (you might have to pay some attention to avoid ...


7

GitHub wins for ease of collaboration. If other people want to contribute to your project you don't have to worry about giving them write access to your repository or deal with manually applying e-mailed patch files. Instead they can fork your project and commit changes to their own copy. If they have something they want to share with you they can send a ...


7

The majority actually do have this feature or something similar, as you can see on this comparison chart (Wikipedia). The ones that don't, probably figure that they'd just be reinventing the wheel because, as your question implies, there are already a plethora of free forum packages available. Even many of the project hosts that do provide this, such as ...


6

Kiln from Fogcreek There is a free version that allows for two developers.


6

The advantage of a distributed system (Git, Mercurial, Bazaar) is that even if your remote host does disappear completely, you'll still have the full repository history locally, from which you can start again elsewhere. With something like Subversion, if you lose the server you'll only have the working copy, which is better than nothing but means you've ...


6

LaunchPad has a concept innovative comparing with first generation project repositories. It has most tools that any project can need. It uses Bazaar as version control which can decrease the interest of some programmers.


6

GitHub is a popular choice. Open-source repositories on GitHub are free.



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