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1

Why should this be all negative? New people bring new ideas and insights to the group: New tools Other ways of working By having to explain the ways of your team to them, people in your team get challenged: Why did we decide to do it like this? Is the reason above still valid? Explaining stuff to people get people out of their confort zone And the ...


0

A library which is created for .NET Fw 4.0 (or before, down to 2.0) should be (in most real-world cases) usable from any 4.5 project (the opposite is not true). So as long as there is no compelling reason to upgrade a library to .NET Fw 4.5, I would recommend to stay at 4.0, at least as long as you have at least one project which is 4.5 based which uses that ...


3

The proper answer in 2014 is none of the above. First, that default file save location has no real meaning in life -- I suspect it is just Microsoft following their own rules about where programs should save things by default. As for how to deal with cross-cutting dependency projects, the right answer is to treat them as projects in their own right with ...


0

Some inspiration of what is possible can be found on these existing Performance Dashboards. Unfortunately, not all of them are free software, and neither of them seems to be ready-to-use by others: https://datazilla.mozilla.org/ http://goperfd.appspot.com/perf http://speed.pypy.org/ https://chromeperf.appspot.com/


2

What is the best way to get a grip on intended and unintended performance changes in such a setup? I don't know anything about your benchmark suite, but as far as I understand the question, this can be implemented as an automatic test (I assume you have already a test suite with integration or acceptance tests in place). What you need is a ...


2

I believe that the best approach for your case is using Jenkins with the Performance Plugin. It has nice graphs and can be used both with JMeter and SoapUI. Also test performance is important. According to Martin Fowler it is better to run fast unit tests for every commit and slow integration and performance tests every few hours.


2

I have a limited amount of experience with Jenkins. One thing I really liked about it was the dashboard display that had been set up by my colleagues, using plugins for Jira, Subversion, and Clover (code coverage). Jenkins supports quite a number of plugins and you can develop them yourself. I know that Hudson has a similar extensibility.


3

First, I do not know the average programmer, but at my current job I have inherited, alone, some 100 classes, many with more than 2k lines (and didn't have the luxury of 5/10 code quality). So I would not overworry about it. That said, before deciding between "I will make little changes or a major restructure first", maybe you should know what you have and ...


1

In some ways this is your failing for not correctly "managing the client". You say they have expectations that you find unreasonable, and that's the core of the problem. Most companies and people have no problem spending money if they think they are getting value from it. In most cases this is limited by budget, but a company will spend $2,000 if they ...


-1

You need to freeze on a set of requirements that you are going to work on and give the ETA for it and count the time for bugs and some additional buffer time while giving the ETA. Any changes that come happen after the release of the set of requirements that you froze upon or they should go to the manager who would then request you to prioritize and give a ...


0

I had one manager who I liked that described a project as "pushing a wall forward". That is, for most of the project there's an almost overwhelming span of tasks that you have to push forward at more or less the same rate -- like pushing a wall. But at some point, he would say, you hit a critical threshold, and then the wall just sort of disappears, and ...


1

I think most of the people in software development will sooner or later go through a project like the one you describe. The good thing I can tell you: You'll learn a lot. Once you went down the hard road, you'll see things differently and your next project will already be better. Here are some thoughts what you can do now: It seems like your project ...


9

What you experience is called feature creep The Dilbert site has a nice collection about this topic. Now, my suggestion at the beginning was to: 1: Set priorities for all the features. I would have proposed the same. This didn't work out well, since about 70% of the features got priority 1, all the others got priority 2. And the verdict ...


2

I'm a bit worried that it's the program manager, not marketing, who is continually adding new features. But in a sense, that's not your problem. Whenever the manager comes up with a new feature request, try to estimate not just how long it will take to code up, but add in a generous margin for bug fixing and reversion testing caused by the change. ...


13

It's a software project, therefore it's overrunning. That's a slightly flippant answer, but this is a very common problem. You say there are "requirement changes constantly incoming": that's why you're overrunning. You absolutely have to have a requirements freeze or you will never ship. Only with the requirements frozen can you issue a release date. Your ...


3

New developer will bring down the work rate of at least one experienced person as they constantly ask questions. This is a good thing, in moderation. Every process has countless sources of friction - be it tooling-related, design-related, or whatever. Trouble is, a lot of your sources of friction you don't notice. Having someone come on board brings a ...


1

does rotating out the team members work? Define "work". Rotating team members sometimes spreads (good or bad) culture to the different sprint teams. Sometimes it can build teamwork between teams because people get to build friendships that didn't exist before. Does it spread domain knowledge? slowly. Like months slowly. Does it slow down sprint ...


4

"New developer leaves the company - wow we wasted a whole bunch of time." There are a classical response to this: why if you don't invest time in the training of this developer and he decides to stay at the company? In my opinion is a good idea that developers rotate between teams, normally this gives developers a better understanding of the company as a ...


5

One possibility: If you are concerned about loss of productivity by rotating a team member, your manager has the correct approach, and will most likely be seriously concerned (if he's any good), but not saying so. As companies grow, they become less concerned about immediate productivity and more concerned about continuity and predictability. Issues such ...


7

With the exception of people sunk in the real programmer syndrome, no one is going to disregard you for using Unity. Unity is a framework, like many others, that helps you make software. Saying that using 3rd frameworks and libraries is being lazy is like saying that driving(or using public transport) to work instead of walking is being lazy. While that ...


6

Introduce your boss to Brook's Law. "adding manpower to a late software project makes it later" If your boss says that you should involve the coworker despite Brook's Law; congratulations, you just became a tutor.


5

No-one can really say, given the details provided. Your co-worker might want to help but felt it wasn't part of his job so never offered, or didn't want to tread on your toes. So, easiest thing to do is to find a self-contained piece of work that you can offer him to help you, and if it turns out to be poor, the worst thing that can happen is that you have ...


6

Mentoring a beginner whilst you've got your own work to do can be brutal; especially if you're working on the complex bit of work that needs to get done desperately and even more so if you've had to give them the same. Any possible answer to this question is highly dependent on your working environment, time pressures and the actual capability of the person ...


-2

You first make Work Brakedown Structure (WBS). From WBS create Activity List (Activity Definition), than create estimates for each activity (number of hours/days). Create resources required for each activity. Calculate total resources and time required from this list. Although there are many other factor impacting resource requirements but this answer is ...


-1

Certainly the popularity of a programming language is one factor to consider. TIOBE offers a useful index of language popularity including graphs that show change over time. TIOBE points out that the index "ratings are based on the number of skilled engineers world-wide, courses and third party vendors. Popular search engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo!, ...


9

The tier-bound organization runs the risk that decisions will be made based on who will implement them rather on where they should be implemented. For example, design a feature so that the major part of the work will be done in tier X, even though it naturally belongs to tier Y, since the tier Y team happens to have much more workload than the tier X team. ...


6

I would go with what works for the team members you have and/or are able to hire. Sort of let it happen organically. Larger organizations can probably hire enough specialists to handle all the tasks they need. This can also depend on how "agile" you really want to be. If everyone can do everything, you have the most flexibility. One organization may have ...



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