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10

Use-cases are the description of the problem to solve, therefore, they must come before any other step in the process. I'd argue that it's not possible to make anything meaningful without knowing the problem. Use-cases will then determine what you design, whether you make class diagrams before writing any code, however, is personal preference.


6

Forget a moment about the "BDD buzzword", and let's talk about what we called it the last decades: functional specs. If you think the specs you get from your PO are not detailed enough, write the missing parts on your own. This gives you lots of room for creative discussion, before actually starting to code, but will also help you to remember what decisions ...


4

You "forgot" to mention it, but I assume you are talking about gathering requirements for a new software by using UML, right? I think the first step in this should always be to understand the use cases (and I am not talking about fancy use case diagram, I am talking about the business process of your users, what they are doing and how the new software ...


4

All examples here are picking on IE 6. Feel free to mentally swap it with Gingerbread or whatever software you are dealing with when reading this. The larger the set of systems that you need to deal with, the more development and testing it will take. This includes resources like actualizing having a machine that still runs IE 6 (for those holdouts). As ...


3

This absolutely depends on your individual needs and your audience. If you're targeting a largely well-off audience, you can write off old versions pretty freely. If your audience includes a lot of people with older equipment (lower income people, older people, people in the developing world, etc.) you may still find you need to support IE 7 on Windows XP in ...


1

These aren't very good requirements at all but unfortunately in real world it is quite common to get "requirements analysis" which contains "requirements" like those. I would recommend to go trough available documentation and convert all the "requirements" to user stories. When converting, you will find out which really are requirements and which are ...


1

Use cases first is the right approach because tons of software engineers before us have found out already I have not heard about people who prefer coding first (class diagrams) and think about it only afterwards (use cases) and still are able to produce non-trivial working software. On the contrary I have heard about many projects who failed completely, ...



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