Hot answers tagged

141

I would argue that "in the age of GitHub, Stack Exchange, Coursera, Udacity, blogs, etc." the relevance of a concise and a well written resume is more important than ever. As an employer, I am not going to start with your github projects and blog posts. I might end up checking them if: your resume is relevant to my job requirements; and your resume ...


125

Look at a resume as a distilled brochure that advertises highlights from your skills and experience. A combination of your github and SO profiles and a bunch of other online resources may be complete and accurate, but it isn't sorted or otherwise prepared for easy reading in any way. People who hire want you to tell them what you think distinguishes you from ...


94

Your participation in Stack Overflow (or indeed any Stack Exchange site) should come under your "interests". Yes, it is related to your work, but it's not your work (unless you happen to be employed by Stack Exchange). If you do decide to put your SO profile on your CV then it would be a good idea to make sure that: Your profile picture is set to a photo ...


83

Should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Why? To determine if they're a big fat liar? Or to humiliate them? Or to prove your total technical superiority? Or to make a hiring decision? Be sure to distinguish between doing the right thing in hiring and being a jerk about nuances on ...


78

I drop old technologies from the "technologies" section of my resume when I am no longer interested in working with them, or when they aren't being used anymore. I don't think long lists of technologies do anyone any favors. I think technical depth is best illustrated through your work experience, where you can mention older technologies if you like.


62

C, C++ I don't like C/C++, because though C++ is technically a superset of C, to do it right, you have to do things differently. C/C++ makes you look like someone who knows C and knows that a C++-compiler accepts C, too.


58

I've read a lot of resumes, some good, some bad, and they've never had a list like this. Honestly, it would indicate to me a candidate who has extremely little hands-on experience and is desperate to pad a thin resume. And a candidate who hasn't bothered to research common resume formats. Such a resume would most likely be circular-filed. By me, anyway.


57

Change Employers The most efficient way is to learn and do cool stuff and change jobs every year or so. You are far more likely to get more money from a new employer than you are to get a hefty raise from your current employer.


41

There are broadly 4 ways: Build Seniority If you're happy with your current company and want to stay there, a good way to be able to demand more is to become the senior resident expert at a vital technology and/or internal code base. I've watched people do this at several companies I've worked at. They became so obviously and publicly super-productive and ...


36

I would usually write C/C++ as a habit, but: some pedantic recruiter might think you wrongly assume they are the same (unlikely...I hope), there's a higher likelihood that C, C++ gets parsed to the elements C and C++ than C/C++... which might matter when recruiters try to match your profile to requirements for a role. So try to have maybe C/C++ in your ...


32

I have a few rules for when I make cuts and edits to my resume: The resume is one page long. The resume contains relevant technologies to the position applied. The resume contains relevant job history to the position applied. While it may seem nice to have everything from technology and job history, resumes should be easy to read and skim for whoever is ...


31

1) Regarding interviewing etiquette, should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Can I do this without making the candidate feel uncomfortable? No. Find out of they posess the skills needed for the job you need them to do (and if they're "Smart and Gets Things Done"). 2) Regarding ...


31

If you get laid off today: Today: Go home, play some loud music, and relax. Tomorrow: Update your resume and your LinkedIn page. Pull together all of those unsolicited recruiter emails you've been getting over the past year. Start contacting friends. Over the next week: Consider what it is you would enjoy about your preferred job - languages, technology, ...


31

Save it for the interview When you get to interview, it's highly likely you'll discuss certain topics like algorithm choice, refactoring, effective teamwork, etc. This'd be the time to discuss your experiences and optionally give references to widely-recognised books on those topics. As an employer, I wouldn't be able to tell from listing the books on your ...


30

Would "proficient" be useful, if not that, "competent". Both words suggesting a comfort with tasks given within a certain range.


29

The people who fine-tune their resumes to the job for which they are applying are the most successful at getting interviews. I've experienced this from both the applicant side and the reviewer side. If I'm hiring for a web developer position, I'm probably not going to be concerned about whether or not the applicant knows C++ or Objective C. It's also been ...


28

As for me, when I review a candidate's resume that has a laundry list of skills, especially with a self-assessment of "expert", that isn't placed into the specific context of the projects and accomplishments where you've applied those skills, I think that there's at least some inflation of skills, and potentially some Dunning-Kruger effect going on there. ...


27

To me, "C/C++" is a strong negative signal. Bjarne Stroustrup writes: There is no language called "C/C++". The phrase is usually used by people who don't have a clue about programming (e.g. HR personnel and poor managers). Alternatively, it's used by people who simple do not know C++ (and often not C either). When used by programmers, it ...


27

You could tell them you're very good with Ruby (assuming you ARE good with Ruby) and that you'd be willing to learn Rails as a part of a new job (assuming you ARE willing and interested to learn the Rails framework). On-the-job training is not that uncommon. I had to pick up JavaEE, Spring, Hibernate on the job. I had Java and web apps (not in Java) so they ...


27

I generally don't care too much about the specific skill sets listed on the resume. I just ask them about the work they do/have done. The word matching part of resumes is unfortunate for all concerned and I blame the recruiters. If the person is/does blatantly lie about experience then of course you want to consider if they are a good fit for you. I ...


27

Here's my magic question to sort out exaggerated claims. You have [insert technology] listed here in your skills... How comfortable are you with answering technical questions about that? Honest candidates will tell you outright if they haven't worked on that technology for five years, or only have had basic exposure, or studied that in college twelve ...


27

Don't. A book is the source of knowledge, but it's the demonstration of that knowledge that really matters.


25

There are three differences between commercial experience and non-commercial, in terms of language skills (there are many more in terms of general development experience). Commercial is generally full-time, and thus more valuable than a part-time non-commercial. That said, not all non-commercial is part-time. Commercial tends to involve working in a team, ...


25

Most HR screening these days done by recruiters and corporate HR departments is automated resume reading. A human never sees your resume/application. A computer program that searches out keywords in a plain text, HTML or Word document determines if your resume matches the specified job criteria. If it's a match, a HR person, who knows nothing about GitHub ...


24

As long as you know how to think the problems through, it does not matter how many languages you are proficient in. But since you are proficient with C++, you could invest a few months time to gain some skill in C# or Java (or Ruby, for that matter).


24

I once heard a résumé described as "a balance sheet that shows only your assets but not your liabilities". Based on this definition, you want to include projects that will be an asset to you in getting the job while leaving out those that might be a liability. This means they should be relevant to the job you are applying for and show off your best work. ...


23

I wouldn't I'd find it a bit juvenile if I found something like that on a resume. Also, do you really want a potential employeer to be able to evaluate in detail everything you've ever written on SO? Chances are that you've at least said something he might disagree with.


23

I have been programming for a very long time and I have in depth knowledge of several technologies. Whenever someone tells me that they have "in-depth" knowledge of several technologies, especially unrelated technologies, I begin to ask questions. In-depth knowledge is something that not only takes a lot of time (many years), but dedication and ...



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