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136

I would argue that "in the age of GitHub, Stack Exchange, Coursera, Udacity, blogs, etc." the relevance of a concise and a well written resume is more important than ever. As an employer, I am not going to start with your github projects and blog posts. I might end up checking them if: your resume is relevant to my job requirements; and your resume ...


122

Look at a resume as a distilled brochure that advertises highlights from your skills and experience. A combination of your github and SO profiles and a bunch of other online resources may be complete and accurate, but it isn't sorted or otherwise prepared for easy reading in any way. People who hire want you to tell them what you think distinguishes you from ...


91

Your participation in Stack Overflow (or indeed any Stack Exchange site) should come under your "interests". Yes, it is related to your work, but it's not your work (unless you happen to be employed by Stack Exchange). If you do decide to put your SO profile on your CV then it would be a good idea to make sure that: Your profile picture is set to a photo ...


77

I drop old technologies from the "technologies" section of my resume when I am no longer interested in working with them, or when they aren't being used anymore. I don't think long lists of technologies do anyone any favors. I think technical depth is best illustrated through your work experience, where you can mention older technologies if you like.


73

It Depends When I was looking for a job a month ago, I didn't put a link to SO on my resume, but I did mention that I participate on SO and added a link to my blog that contains the SO "flair" on the About page. At that point I had about 3000 rep. I wouldn't try to leverage rep, but I would leverage intelligent participation. If you act like a moron on SO ...


62

You should be able to defend/explain each and every word you put in your resume. Kind of like you dissertation/thesis. I have seen many candidates rejected with the reason "could not justify what he had put in his resume". One approach is to follow Google's self questionnaire. Rate each skill on a scale of 10. That way we can project how relatively ...


42

It tells me a few things when I look at a Resume: you're able to work independently you're comfortable working on a (possibly) large team that's geographically spread out you're familiar with modern technologies you enjoy your profession you probably have a beard


41

I've come across some senior level guys perhaps whose skills are so outdated or irrelevant for the project, that all they do is google, copy-then-paste some code without thinking about the solution as a whole. As a result we have a mismash of JSON, AJAX, callbacks, ASMX, WCF and postbacks in the same project. It is clear there is no ...


40

No I would not put any websites on my Resume. I will make reference to projects or applications I have done and other information that is readily applicable to the person reviewing the resume. My resume is a one page summary of me, I don't have room for the half dozen SO family accounts, LinkedIn, my blog, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Digg, Reddit, (you get ...


38

You can always list languages (as well as other skills) in tiers on a resume: Proficient: Java, Lisp Familiar with: Perl, C++ As a guy looking at a resume, I will appreciate both the honesty and the effort; and when bringing you in the first question you usually get asked is to rate your individual language proficiency more precisely, orally or on ...


38

It basically comes down to "use the right tool for the job." If you have to interact with a user, you'll want some sort of GUI. We've got decades of research and experience showing that they make computing far more intuitive and productive. That's why GUIs have inexorably taken over the world ever since 1984: they just work better for interacting with ...


37

There are broadly 4 ways: Build Seniority If you're happy with your current company and want to stay there, a good way to be able to demand more is to become the senior resident expert at a vital technology and/or internal code base. I've watched people do this at several companies I've worked at. They became so obviously and publicly super-productive and ...


32

I have a few rules for when I make cuts and edits to my resume: The resume is one page long. The resume contains relevant technologies to the position applied. The resume contains relevant job history to the position applied. While it may seem nice to have everything from technology and job history, resumes should be easy to read and skim for whoever is ...


31

If you get laid off today: Today: Go home, play some loud music, and relax. Tomorrow: Update your resume and your LinkedIn page. Pull together all of those unsolicited recruiter emails you've been getting over the past year. Start contacting friends. Over the next week: Consider what it is you would enjoy about your preferred job - languages, technology, ...


31

Eric Raymond's The Art of Unix Programming is the canonical work for the argument you're making. I won't try to condense his excellent book into a couple paragraphs. However, keep in mind that argument applies mostly to programmers, administrators automating tasks using scripting, or power users of highly technical software like CAD. Even with highly ...


29

You have asked so many questions in one; let me try to answer while segregating them. I hire many people which falls in this profile type and quite often i have to take so many interviews and reject people because often they don't quite have clear answer to the questions you asked. Is having good mastery in C or C++ is good enough to qualify you for the ...


28

The people who fine-tune their resumes to the job for which they are applying are the most successful at getting interviews. I've experienced this from both the applicant side and the reviewer side. If I'm hiring for a web developer position, I'm probably not going to be concerned about whether or not the applicant knows C++ or Objective C. It's also been ...


27

For the people that really matter, no, it shouldn't confuse them. Anyone who knows anything about real-world C and C++ programming knows that although despite their similarities and history, production programming in either is more often than not a completely different animal.


25

Yes. Your SO profile gives potential employers a look at you actually coding, as well as your ability to solve problems and seek help. If you have any amount of reputation there, I'd say put it on. Either a URL alongside your contact info, or a bullet under "Misc"/"Other" with your rep.


25

As for me, when I review a candidate's resume that has a laundry list of skills, especially with a self-assessment of "expert", that isn't placed into the specific context of the projects and accomplishments where you've applied those skills, I think that there's at least some inflation of skills, and potentially some Dunning-Kruger effect going on there. ...


24

You could tell them you're very good with Ruby (assuming you ARE good with Ruby) and that you'd be willing to learn Rails as a part of a new job (assuming you ARE willing and interested to learn the Rails framework). On-the-job training is not that uncommon. I had to pick up JavaEE, Spring, Hibernate on the job. I had Java and web apps (not in Java) so they ...


24

Most HR screening these days done by recruiters and corporate HR departments is automated resume reading. A human never sees your resume/application. A computer program that searches out keywords in a plain text, HTML or Word document determines if your resume matches the specified job criteria. If it's a match, a HR person, who knows nothing about GitHub ...


23

I wouldn't I'd find it a bit juvenile if I found something like that on a resume. Also, do you really want a potential employeer to be able to evaluate in detail everything you've ever written on SO? Chances are that you've at least said something he might disagree with.


23

I have been programming for a very long time and I have in depth knowledge of several technologies. Whenever someone tells me that they have "in-depth" knowledge of several technologies, especially unrelated technologies, I begin to ask questions. In-depth knowledge is something that not only takes a lot of time (many years), but dedication and ...


23

I once heard a résumé described as "a balance sheet that shows only your assets but not your liabilities". Based on this definition, you want to include projects that will be an asset to you in getting the job while leaving out those that might be a liability. This means they should be relevant to the job you are applying for and show off your best work. ...


23

There are three differences between commercial experience and non-commercial, in terms of language skills (there are many more in terms of general development experience). Commercial is generally full-time, and thus more valuable than a part-time non-commercial. That said, not all non-commercial is part-time. Commercial tends to involve working in a team, ...


22

To my way of thinking, the focus on specific technologies is a mistake. I still list my Rexx experience, not because I think anyone today would be looking for it, but because I want to highlight my capacity to move fluidly in different languages, even after 19 years in I.T. No, I probably could not fluently white-board some of the languages I list. But, ...


22

Honestly I think you're over thinking it a bit. If you were gaining relevant experience during your time off, then your resume should not even show a break in your work timeline. Instead of a company name just put something like Entrepreneurial Pursuits. You don't even have to explain in detail each project. The important parts are the technologies you ...


22

Your resume exists for 2 purposes: 1) To convince someone in 30 seconds or less to give you an interview. 2) To give someone hints on questions to ask you during an interview. Everything that doesn't serve one of these purposes should be left off. In your specific case, as others have mentioned, if you have enough other information on the resume to ...


21

Personal projects. You can contribute to open source projects or write something on your own. If you can literally point to something and say "I wrote this" it's very impressive. Further, it shows that you're passionate about what you do because you're doing it for free in your spare time. List them on your resume under a projects section. If you have a ...



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