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136

I would argue that "in the age of GitHub, Stack Exchange, Coursera, Udacity, blogs, etc." the relevance of a concise and a well written resume is more important than ever. As an employer, I am not going to start with your github projects and blog posts. I might end up checking them if: your resume is relevant to my job requirements; and your resume ...


123

Look at a resume as a distilled brochure that advertises highlights from your skills and experience. A combination of your github and SO profiles and a bunch of other online resources may be complete and accurate, but it isn't sorted or otherwise prepared for easy reading in any way. People who hire want you to tell them what you think distinguishes you from ...


91

Your participation in Stack Overflow (or indeed any Stack Exchange site) should come under your "interests". Yes, it is related to your work, but it's not your work (unless you happen to be employed by Stack Exchange). If you do decide to put your SO profile on your CV then it would be a good idea to make sure that: Your profile picture is set to a photo ...


83

Should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Why? To determine if they're a big fat liar? Or to humiliate them? Or to prove your total technical superiority? Or to make a hiring decision? Be sure to distinguish between doing the right thing in hiring and being a jerk about nuances on ...


77

I drop old technologies from the "technologies" section of my resume when I am no longer interested in working with them, or when they aren't being used anymore. I don't think long lists of technologies do anyone any favors. I think technical depth is best illustrated through your work experience, where you can mention older technologies if you like.


75

It Depends When I was looking for a job a month ago, I didn't put a link to SO on my resume, but I did mention that I participate on SO and added a link to my blog that contains the SO "flair" on the About page. At that point I had about 3000 rep. I wouldn't try to leverage rep, but I would leverage intelligent participation. If you act like a moron on SO ...


64

You should be able to defend/explain each and every word you put in your resume. Kind of like you dissertation/thesis. I have seen many candidates rejected with the reason "could not justify what he had put in his resume". One approach is to follow Google's self questionnaire. Rate each skill on a scale of 10. That way we can project how relatively ...


61

C, C++ I don't like C/C++, because though C++ is technically a superset of C, to do it right, you have to do things differently. C/C++ makes you look like someone who knows C and knows that a C++-compiler accepts C, too.


58

I've read a lot of resumes, some good, some bad, and they've never had a list like this. Honestly, it would indicate to me a candidate who has extremely little hands-on experience and is desperate to pad a thin resume. And a candidate who hasn't bothered to research common resume formats. Such a resume would most likely be circular-filed. By me, anyway.


52

Change Employers The most efficient way is to learn and do cool stuff and change jobs every year or so. You are far more likely to get more money from a new employer than you are to get a hefty raise from your current employer.


42

It tells me a few things when I look at a Resume: you're able to work independently you're comfortable working on a (possibly) large team that's geographically spread out you're familiar with modern technologies you enjoy your profession you probably have a beard


41

I've come across some senior level guys perhaps whose skills are so outdated or irrelevant for the project, that all they do is google, copy-then-paste some code without thinking about the solution as a whole. As a result we have a mismash of JSON, AJAX, callbacks, ASMX, WCF and postbacks in the same project. It is clear there is no ...


40

No I would not put any websites on my Resume. I will make reference to projects or applications I have done and other information that is readily applicable to the person reviewing the resume. My resume is a one page summary of me, I don't have room for the half dozen SO family accounts, LinkedIn, my blog, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Digg, Reddit, (you get ...


40

You can always list languages (as well as other skills) in tiers on a resume: Proficient: Java, Lisp Familiar with: Perl, C++ As a guy looking at a resume, I will appreciate both the honesty and the effort; and when bringing you in the first question you usually get asked is to rate your individual language proficiency more precisely, orally or on ...


38

There are broadly 4 ways: Build Seniority If you're happy with your current company and want to stay there, a good way to be able to demand more is to become the senior resident expert at a vital technology and/or internal code base. I've watched people do this at several companies I've worked at. They became so obviously and publicly super-productive and ...


38

It basically comes down to "use the right tool for the job." If you have to interact with a user, you'll want some sort of GUI. We've got decades of research and experience showing that they make computing far more intuitive and productive. That's why GUIs have inexorably taken over the world ever since 1984: they just work better for interacting with ...


35

I would usually write C/C++ as a habit, but: some pedantic recruiter might think you wrongly assume they are the same (unlikely...I hope), there's a higher likelihood that C, C++ gets parsed to the elements C and C++ than C/C++... which might matter when recruiters try to match your profile to requirements for a role. So try to have maybe C/C++ in your ...


32

I have a few rules for when I make cuts and edits to my resume: The resume is one page long. The resume contains relevant technologies to the position applied. The resume contains relevant job history to the position applied. While it may seem nice to have everything from technology and job history, resumes should be easy to read and skim for whoever is ...


31

1) Regarding interviewing etiquette, should I attempt to determine whether a person really possesses all of the skills they claim to have? Can I do this without making the candidate feel uncomfortable? No. Find out of they posess the skills needed for the job you need them to do (and if they're "Smart and Gets Things Done"). 2) Regarding ...


31

If you get laid off today: Today: Go home, play some loud music, and relax. Tomorrow: Update your resume and your LinkedIn page. Pull together all of those unsolicited recruiter emails you've been getting over the past year. Start contacting friends. Over the next week: Consider what it is you would enjoy about your preferred job - languages, technology, ...


31

Save it for the interview When you get to interview, it's highly likely you'll discuss certain topics like algorithm choice, refactoring, effective teamwork, etc. This'd be the time to discuss your experiences and optionally give references to widely-recognised books on those topics. As an employer, I wouldn't be able to tell from listing the books on your ...


31

Eric Raymond's The Art of Unix Programming is the canonical work for the argument you're making. I won't try to condense his excellent book into a couple paragraphs. However, keep in mind that argument applies mostly to programmers, administrators automating tasks using scripting, or power users of highly technical software like CAD. Even with highly ...


29

The people who fine-tune their resumes to the job for which they are applying are the most successful at getting interviews. I've experienced this from both the applicant side and the reviewer side. If I'm hiring for a web developer position, I'm probably not going to be concerned about whether or not the applicant knows C++ or Objective C. It's also been ...


29

You have asked so many questions in one; let me try to answer while segregating them. I hire many people which falls in this profile type and quite often i have to take so many interviews and reject people because often they don't quite have clear answer to the questions you asked. Is having good mastery in C or C++ is good enough to qualify you for the ...


28

Would "proficient" be useful, if not that, "competent". Both words suggesting a comfort with tasks given within a certain range.


27

I generally don't care too much about the specific skill sets listed on the resume. I just ask them about the work they do/have done. The word matching part of resumes is unfortunate for all concerned and I blame the recruiters. If the person is/does blatantly lie about experience then of course you want to consider if they are a good fit for you. I ...


27

Here's my magic question to sort out exaggerated claims. You have [insert technology] listed here in your skills... How comfortable are you with answering technical questions about that? Honest candidates will tell you outright if they haven't worked on that technology for five years, or only have had basic exposure, or studied that in college twelve ...


27

Don't. A book is the source of knowledge, but it's the demonstration of that knowledge that really matters.



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