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27

I have come to realize that SMART goals are best used when people have a deficiency they need to correct, and are not so good for times you want people to grow or go from good to great. If someone is not doing timesheets, for example, and this is hurting the company because you sometimes have to delay invoicing, you could have a smart goal like "over the ...


25

Some of the other answers have stated something that is right on — be bold, ask for a salary increase, and show why you deserve it. However, that really doesn't address your issue — you accepted a salary that you were happy with in the context of your own experience, and you have found out someone in a comparable role (and equal or worse ...


11

First off, double check on whether the expectation of management is that a "performance review" is a place where you talk about money. In some companies the two tasks are separate, although the outcome of the performance review SHOULD impact the subsequent decisions about money. I don't think you're being greedy at all, but you definitely want to pull off ...


10

This answer is written from the perspective of someone who had such a performance management system put in place around an Agile team; like you, everyone on the team realized the difficulty/uselessness of year-long SMART goals applied to an Agile group, where, when fully functioning, the implementation of Agile can be considered inherently/already SMART. ...


9

You should try out Review Board. My company uses it with Perforce and it's very efficient and doesn't interrupt the normal workflow (well, anymore than Perforce does). I believe it works with Mercurial. You can also look at the Mercurial Review Board extension.


6

Where are you located? Is there either a local or national vision impairment group/community you could reach out to? Here in Canada we have the CNIB. If I were in your shoes, I'd reach out to them and ask if they could lend a hand. If you can't get in contact with such a group, try holding some usability tests for people with vision impairments. I'd ...


6

With all training you need to show how it will benefit the company. Any benefit to you is incidental. In this case I would mention the idea of it being a selling point as an extra benefit, but only if I could back it up. The main benefit to the company is that through training you will be able to produce a better quality product and produce that product ...


6

I'm not sure I can give you a thorough review via internet, but some notes as I read through: There is more than one note with the same name. Low C, middle C, high C, etc. And even there, "high"/"low" is relative to the instrument playing them, so those probably aren't sufficient names. I don't particularly like Note knowing how to play itself. The same ...


5

Since I'm about to go into an objective-setting conversation with my boss, I thought I'd add a few examples that are similar to some I'm considering suggesting for myself: Increase test coverage for code in Project X to at least 95% by March 31st. Complete and distribute first draft of Project Y Architecture document by April 30th Collect review comments ...


5

Do you need the qualification or do you need the knowledge and experience? As you are already employed at your company they will know your ability level and aptitude to learn. It's possible to train informally and more formally without gaining a qualification and this is usually faster and cheaper. This will almost certainly be more attractive to your ...


5

Of course there are other ways to measure performance. Unfortunately (unless I missed something in your post), you're not in a position to dictate the office's criterea (however archaic it may seem). Your job (if you want to succeed there and further your career), is to meet and exceed those expectations. Ask your manager for an explanation of how they ...


4

In my experience, sprint planning usually takes half a day for a two-week sprint on a complicated project with clients who don't really know what they're doing. Obviously, with a smart, experienced team it's usually quicker. Sprint planning time doesn't scale linearly, though - a four-week sprint generally doesn't take a full day to plan and a one-week ...


4

No, and you aren't going to get information about most proprietary/closed-source commercial codebases. If the company relies on the codebase for anything serious, it will be considered confidential, and anybody leaking it is going to be prosecuted. You can certainly ask about technologies used during an interview. I always do.


4

No, not at all. Encouraging people to contact you in the app description can reduce "the app doesn't work" reviews, but that's about it. It's unfortunate and pretty severely flawed, but there's no way to contact the reviewer and no way to challenge or respond to reviews. Reviews from people who've used the app and indicate they've not had the problem might ...


4

I am a project leader in a mid size company in Switzerland (about 2000 people). In my team I always try to avoid being too strict about office time. I also organize a social event weekly in order to know my collegues also under a personal perspective. However every week or 2 weeks I set a milestone that has to be achieved by each developer. In this way i ...


3

You are not greedy but you are jealous. Which is not exactly better as it will ruin the relationship you have with your collegue. He may not be as good as you at programming but he's better than you at negotiating his salary. As he learns from you programming, you can learn from him salary negotiation and how to be bold with your boss. Working is not just ...


3

What you are asking for would be precluded by law and intellectual property policies. It would be the same thing as asking for details about a top restaurant's best recipes. In its stead, you can ask about the following more productive topics: What do you use to develop with? If I had a preferred tool you don't currently use, would I be able/how would I ...


3

Code reviews can be immensely helpful in identifying potential bugs and making sure that developers adhere to company coding standards. However, it's important to have clear guidelines about what is and is not up for review. A written coding standard—accessible via a web browser—is a must, in my opinion. And everyone on the team should be given a chance to ...


3

Scrap Word or PDF as a document format - instead write your code in ASCIIDoc or ReStructuredText and use that as a source to generate PDF/Word documents. The benefit of using the lightweight markup is that you can write your documents as plain old text (which programmers would like as they can do it inside the IDE, thus meaning they might do more of it) and ...


3

First off, you should gather the scattered design checklists and associated pieces so that they are in a single place for reference. Second, the leads of your various teams need to review the components that have been pulled together. Note what looks: good and universal (for your organization) needing work but still universal good, but specific to ...


3

Congratulations on accepting the simple task of solving one of the most controversial aspects of software development - measuring software developer value. My advise is to start with a very clear understanding of what the intention of how this analysis is going to be used, as that 'flavours' what kinds of metrics are appropriate, and how effective you are ...


2

Unfortunately no is the short answer. The best thing to do it glean as much information from the (undoubtedly terse) review as possible and try to make sure it won't happen in the future. In my apps I added multiple places where a user can send feedback either by email or via a website. The form prompts people for various pieces of relevant information. ...


2

If you sell software or a product with software in it... Increase sales n%. Really. If the software didn't work, you would not sell much of it. If the software worked REALLY RALLY WELL , you would sell lots. (This will have the software guys watching the sales guys like hawks making sure they don't blow their performance bonus.) If you software is an ...


2

If you want a salary increase, there is only one way to do it. Look for job adverts that are similar to what you do and your experience level and determine roughly what you are worth on the market. You may want to print some of these off to show them, but this could be confrontational. So at your performance review, you say this is roughly the going rate ...


2

Remember: You don't get paid what you are worth, you get paid for how well you negotiate and the relative supply/demand of programmers at the time you were hired. I'd suggest not worrying about what you make compared to other programmers and focus on what salary you think you can make a good case for on your own merits.


2

Be greedy, your employer is. They're trying to get the most work for the least expense. You're trying to get the most compensation for your work. Cave when and where you WANT to cave. Accept what you're willing to work for. Don't think too much about what you're making in relation to others. It can help you gage what your employer is willing to pay ...


2

Simple is best. At some point say "I want a salary increase". Have a number of justifications at the ready, all the good points that they went over in the review. Make sure to point out all the projects you've worked on. (In case this is some bizarro review where they skip that). Mention how little of the review was negative. You could even go with the ...


2

The Ultimate review Point is gets things done, but that is even more vague than the presented ones. The presetend Points could be a try to break getting things done down in components that are easier to measure. But the problem with these points is (with exception of attendance, that's just stupid) is that they are again hard to measure and easy to get ...


2

You should update your version of the main branch against the latest version of the main branch, pulling in changes that have occurred since you branched off for your feature branch. Once this is done you can then compare your differences alone. Example using git: First git rebase (or git merge but I prefer git rebasein case of code conflicts) the feature ...



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