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8

HTML 5 gives you everything that you need to build an application that runs in the browser but without access to any live network resources. That's effectively a desktop application, and it it all JavaScript.


6

I would learn HTML5 because it is the standard way of doing things. Lets say you have 100 hours to spend learning any of the technologies you mention in your question. If you spend 100 hours learning JavaFX and 2 years from now JavaFX is dead then your knowledge of JavaFX is useless. If you spend 100 hours learning HTML5 then 2 years from now when HTML5 is ...


5

This depends on the complexity of the domain. If it mainly consists of structured data, a visual editor may be more intuitive to use, but if the domain contains significant amounts of logic, experience has shown time and time again that visual editors are a poor tool for that. Additionally, there are some very common, very useful tasks that are trivial with ...


3

JavaFX is definitely not a mainstream technology now, but it might help you to understand how non-HTML and JS-based RIA applications work. So, if you just decide what to start learning I would suggest first trying to get acquainted with some general ideas of how implementing RIA applications and every RIA technology would do here as long as you have good ...


2

I built a MVVM (WPF) application for a client about a year ago. The app consisted of multiple modules, tens of screens with up t0 50 fields per screen. I used Prism for the MVVM framework for the screen/region management. I added another simple framework to handle multi-lingual support and built security myself. I found it beneficial having Prism handling ...


2

I will be the contrarian and point out that DSLs are often recommended inappropriately, because they are a more natural and flexible interface for programmers, and programmers like to create systems that are easy for themselves to use. That means DSLs are best suited for features designed for programmers or highly trained and specialized users like IT ...


2

A form restricts the possible expressions to just one type. In natural language terms, you can write anything you can imagine in English. What you can express with a form is much more limited: think Mad Libs for example.


1

There's no "right" answer to your question, but I'll tell you what I've chosen, and a bit about why. Back-End I come from a similar background, and I've chosen to use Spring Data REST as the service layer, because it provides a simple and flexible way to expose CRUD functionality for my data. Until I found this project I was writing the data access and ...


1

There are two things you need to do: As you have correctly identified you can use the fact that the user has logged in to authenticate the RIA Service calls. You can either do this on a call by call basis or arrange you code so that you can only make the RIA Service calls if the user is logged in. You can use the ASP.NET membership database code to do ...


1

Since the DSL is text, I can use text-based tools. Most notably I can generate code for the DSL with a shell script via metaprogramming. As others have said, the DSL doesn't prevent having an RIA as well.


1

Try CSLA for handling business rules and client/server communication, and Jounce for the UI/MVVM. They're both open source, so you have complete control over the code, although using them as-is (IMO) is the best option.


1

You could, if you want to exclude all the people who are not willing to install any Microsoft stuff on their non-Windows device. These days, a lot of people are not too keen on Flash either. I run away from most flash pages. I would stick to HTML, and wouldn't be afraid to use HTML5 features if needed.


1

you certainly could build it in silverlight (keeping in mind the restrictions with performance, available platforms, etc.) and then if you want it for mobile clients either provide a set of "mobile" pages or custom apps for the various platforms (android, iPhone, etc)


1

Flash is a little bit faster than Silverlight, but I'm sure for your purpose it won't matter that much. Bare in mind though, that making an application in Silverlight restricts your possibilities to extend the platform to certain handhelds. I'm thinking of Android and iPhone.. But Yes, you can use Silverlight, to answer to your question.


1

Yes I can and have used Appcelerator for doing both cross platform applications built in JavaScript / HTML and mobile applications built in JavaScript. The documentation may be a bit weak in some areas, but it's a solid platform for developing.



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