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No - there is no harm in using an AWS Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instance for your development platform. But you will have to learn some extra skills that you wouldn't need when developing on a local machine how to use AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), how to use AWS billing (if you exceed the one year free micro instance), and how to use SSH. ...


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Try to learn the fundamental points of Ruby. While you are doing this try to understand how things happen. For a better understanding you should always write some examples to each topic. So most of the time you will see how things work. After you are running fine with the major Ruby language features, you can switch to Rails and start to learn it from ...


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In practice, Rails devs do this by using one of the gems for uploading and attaching images. E.g., Paperclip is maintained by Thoughtbot, very well tested and supports S3. And if you're interested, though, in experimenting and writing your own, you should take a look at Paperclip's source code to see what the current state-of-the-art is.


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I worked on a system that had a large Java application side, and a large Ruby side (both a Rails web site and JSON API). Beware the compatibility issues that can crop up when you keep two copies of domain models written in two different languages. You have to carefully plan your production releases so one application doesn't introduce data in the database ...


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From an architecture point of view, I like to separate entirely the two layers, through a communication layer (web services, rest services...), like a standard SOA architecture. From my understanding, you have: Frontend (Presentation Tier) which you plan to realize in Ruby Backend (Business Tier) which you have to implement in Java You may want to ...


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ActiveRecord, the Ruby ORM, relies quite heavily on features of Ruby that are not available in Java, particularly the "method_missing" method and ability to create member variables dynamically. Implementations of Active Record, the pattern, on Java are therefore harder to work with than in Ruby. Typically, you have to accept one of the following ...


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It sounds to me like you 2 tables: a Product table, and an Image table. The Image table will have a foreign key back to the Product table and will store the image URL. This way, a single Product can have a bunch of Images. Product Image +-----------------+ +-----------+ |ProductID ...


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Sadly, enrolling into university is not an option for me, because my family can't afford to pay for the education and my needs for 4-5 years nor move into capital. In many cases, you can't afford not to get an education. Yes it's costly, but it's the best investment you'll ever make. Get a part-time job. Take out loans. Look for scholarships. It's a ...


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There are some programs online in which you can get to achieve your option 3 with the help of a Mentor. Google Summer of Code is one example, but it requires you to be enrolled in a University Degree. By Quickly Googling this, I found this link. It contains a list of FOSS Mentor Projects. I haven't tried any of those, but I know GSoC and people from GSoC ...


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I would say that it is never 'obsolete' to study outdated software. For sure, there are changes, but what you learn in the earlier versions will translate pretty well, in newer versions. When you hit things that are different from an earlier version of the language or framework, then you have the current documentation (and version) to explore those changes ...



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