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1

Being committed to agile is different from being committed to scrum. In fact in some ways, scrum is not agile. It places a process at the centre rather than people. That said, because the course is not in line with your job title it does raise an issue. For the company to expense it, the course needs to be required for the work you are employed for. ...


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(Just FYI - I am cofounder of a company (Digité) that builds and sells enterprise software to a variety of technology organizations, so I have some background on these topics :-) ) Agile and Scrum are related, in that they are software development methods. Agile is an umbrella term for specific methods such as Scrum, Extreme Programming (XP) and others. ...


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All of them are software development processes. Scrum is very collaborative you discuss with your team constantly so everyone can be aware of what's happening. Helps to deal with problems efficiently as a team. Agile can be many things. But when I have experienced it it has been very fast development with iterations. So you get the product working then ...


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It sounds like you've changed the definition, value, sensitivity of a story point (time, complexity, etc), so you're really doing a conversion and not a re-estimation. Unless there is more to it, it's no different then changing from entering in days and then changing to hours. Just do the math but it's really worth the same based on today's definition.


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We've addressed this by adopting the Kanban approach. We have queues in our tracking software (Jira) with minimum and maximums. We groom 'as needed'. Might be once a week, might be 3 times, depends on the limits and the work that get done. This will help you in getting the product owner focused on keeping your queue with plenty to do and can reduce ...


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I would usually relay that information to the scrum master during the daily scrum meeting. As soon as you know you're behind you should inform the scrum master so he can either get someone to help you (maybe someone else is ahead of schedule and has bandwidth to help), determine whether overtime is needed, or if it's an impediment outside of your team's ...


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Yes, it makes me anxious. But I am usually both behind and anxious anyway. That's what daily standups are for -- so the team doesn't discover a week later that you're a week behind.


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In my opinion your problem its here: "Unless the analysis results in great difference in effort estimate, team is asked to complete the feature." Another company that want to "be agile" for don't spend time in estimation and a more in depth definition of US (and that its totally ok), but there are not "agile" enough to understand the difference between an ...


2

Should the team say no in approving the item unless team understands how the solution will look like? No, of course not. Not knowing the implementation details leaves the team leeway in finding the simplest solution later on. This doesn't mean that discussion should be prevented, but it should certainly be limited. Suppose for example that in the ...


2

Another way of doing it, is by splitting the session into two parts. In the first one the Product Owner goes into the level of detail that the team needs in order to understand the requirements. No effort estimation will be done during this part. Then the PO leaves the room and the team starts with the estimation process the includes the "how it will be ...


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The level of detail at the planning meeting depends a lot on the personality and expertise of the PO. Take user interface as an example: Some product owners have strong UX skills or use UX experts outside the team. These PO's better come with a rough UX spec to the planning meeting. In other cases this skill is more present inside the team. Those teams ...


2

The name "Scrum" symbolises a team working together to move a ball up the field of play. It's a team of equals working together on a single, focused goal. It could be said that the phrasing used in Scrum is deliberately different. It acts as a constant reminder that what we do, and how we do it, has changed.


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Wiktionary has the the following etymology to offer about the origin and meaning of Scrum terminology: Scrum - (rugby) An ordered formation of forwards in which each side aims to gain control of the ball; a scrum. backlog - An accumulation or buildup, especially of unfilled orders or unfinished work artifact - Something viewed as a product of human ...



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