Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

There's one big piece of the puzzle you're missing: response time. Even if the load were light and manageable by one server, and I can't really comment on whether it is or not, you'd have potential latency issues from having Uber in the US served by a single server residing in Australia or Belarus. If you look at news reports of Uber going down, you'll ...


0

Yes, of course it could. Whether they do is another matter as even Uber will not be running all their business off a single server - they'll have web servers to receive requests, application servers to process the data, and a (clustered?) database server to store the data. (well, I assume they do, chances are they are running it all off a single websever ...


1

I guess Requests is "request for service" or order. (because there is "completed requests" metric slightly lower) Their servers also constantly get's pinged by drivers devices (GPS and other stuff), users looking at available cars, gps tracking of users, etc. I can't even say how many requests it will be for 1 trip. But if every car pings with GPS every ...


4

what I should use when it comes to a Web-API for server/client communication Use a REST-style API over HTTP(S) (e.g. /customer/<key>, /product/<key) Use application/json as the content format Use a user/apikey or better OAuth2 authorization scheme Don't fall for the WS*/XML variant with all their proclaimed advantages like security contexts ...


1

There are a lot of tutorial type articles on the web around node.js which was the new hotness for writing applications for the other new hotness of mobile development. In the ones I read they all seemed to want to use a NoSQL DB such as mongodb. But the concept is the same - you write a server in whatever language you like, that exposes a networked ...


2

There's nothing out there that will handle all of that. There's just way too much there. The closest you'll come is something like an MVC framework such as Ruby on Rails or Geddy. They provide your #1, #2, #3 (using Gems or npm packages, etc), and #4. For #5 it sounds like you mean HTTPS? If not can you elaborate? #6 depends. Do you mean the HTTP server ...


0

There is quite a lot of possible solutions to your problem. You can easily write scripts to automate the steps of the process or use an existing ready-to-use continuous integration solution. I will shortly describe the first solution, where you write scripts to do this yourself. On the server where your webapp mywebapp is deployed, write a small script ...


0

I think what you need is a Continuous Integration (CI) server. You can host your own, for example Jenkins which has BitBucket integration or use a hosted service like CodeShip which has a free plan. You could try and set up your own set of scripts to do a similar job but the industry has already provided a solution in this area. You didn't mention tests ...


1

To log in into your application with Facebook account: Authenticate the client with Facebook API, getting user access token as a result. At this point your client is sure about user identity, but your server is not yet. Send user access token to the server. Now server has user access token, but is not sure if it is valid. Debug the token from the server to ...


1

I don't know if it's a best practice but I like to have a development environment as complete as possible. Including application server, database and external applications that are invoked during execution if possible. This allows me to develop independent from others. I can redeploy and restart servers when I need. I can fill my database with my test data, ...


1

Very valid question and my team was in a similar situation - which is why sticking to the core specification of the API in use is so much more important to avoid vendor lock-ins. My answer is assuming you are on a Java stack but you can juxtapose for other language stacks. So yes get local setups for your team but you may not be able to get WebSphere so ...


0

How about decoupling the user model from the task model. Instead create a TaskManager object that could get the tasks for the user. Something like TaskManager.getUserTasks(user); //which would return a list of Task objects the advantage of keeping these two is that you can keep on adding functionality without having to change the User model.


2

One thing to keep in mind is the expected network latency (i.e. ping time) between your clients and your server. In a high-latency situation with otherwise good bandwidth, many small requests will perform significantly worse than one large one. I've recently been collaborating on a multi-team database-backed web application project in which one of the ...


1

What you are describing is asynchronous programming, and more specifically the non-blocking IO model. It has concrete implementations in many languages, including Go, JavaScript( NodeJS ), Clojure, Erlang, C#, P, F#, Python, Perl, Ruby, C, etc. The Go language, for example, was designed with exactly this sort of problem in mind. It uses goroutines to hand ...


1

Based on just the info you gave, option 1, because with a single client request you'd be mixing apples and oranges and the fruit basket might be very large. caching is a tradeoff where you gain performance but potentially lose consistency (stale data). If you don't have any identified performance issues, synchronization problems are usually not worth ...


0

As always in programming, it depends. So, the real question is: what should you consider when deciding for A/B/C or a combination of the three? I would say that the real discriminating factors are the implementation details of the 3rd party APIs you are consuming. As an example, you should consider: Are they fast or slow? Do data changes frequently and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included