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1

It depends on your actual infrastructure. Without knowing how and where do you host your application, it will be difficult to answer. The simplest case where all the traffic is directed to one machine (for example multiple machines are connected to the internet through a router, and one of them is configured as being a DMZ, receiving all the requests from ...


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I have always found a few large requests to be better performing and more scalable. But there are tradeoffs in all approaches, so it depends on the needs of the server and client. You may wish to use another option, which is to have the client specify a whole range or set of data to retrieve -- not necessarily all the data, but some range, which is tuned ...


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For making a game in c# for multiple platforms Unity3D is most popular now a days. And for integrating Facebook leaderboard or any type of leaderboard, saving user scores fetch scores, it is more efficient to direct communicate with a cloud service instead of making your own server, database etc. This will be more effective for your game performance. Have a ...


1

Yes, this is a very common architecture so the problem does pop up frequently. What I would do is that I would introduce a new level of abstraction by defining a "model" for my project which contains and presents the classes that my project deals with irrespective of how they are obtained (via HTTP or ORM.) On the server, this model would be implemented ...


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The best back end webserver language for an embedded C program is... C! There are plenty of embedded C webservers that are trivially easy to use, I added civetweb to my service a while ago and it was too easy. Civetweb is a non-GPL fork of Mongoose, but there are others such as NxWeb. Civetweb has some examples, including ones that include Lua support ...


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What I would do: Contact the 3rd party site, and ask if they could include you in their CORS policy, if not then Make sure there's no JSONP or similar "public access" point to use, if not then Use a CORS proxy (There's quite a few out there: https://www.google.dk/search?q=free+cors+proxy&oq=free+cor - But do know that you now trust the CORS provider ...


0

Fundamentally, you can't take advantage of someone else's AJAX services unless they explicitly give you permission. There may be all sorts of sensitive information that could be exposed as a result. My browser protects me from this by enforcing cross-origin policies. Of course, I could defeat this by modifying my browser to ignore cross-origin concerns. ...


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The web server is expected to give HTTP replies (to the web clients, i.e. browser) fairly quickly. A user would be unhappy if a web page loads in more than a second or two. However, you could use AJAX and websocket technologies (with HTML5 and Javascript) in your web page. Then your web page could query asynchronously or periodically the web server (which ...



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