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75

It's an awful idea. It may be quicker in the short term, but it encourages badly documented hard-to-understand code as only the coder who wrote it is responsible for maintaining it. When someone leaves the company or goes on holiday the whole plan becomes mucked up. It also makes it very hard to allocate workloads; what happens when two urgent bugs come up ...


50

I'll probably get flamed for this but... 140 characters is hardly the format to get any real pearls of programming wisdom. Most (but not all) programming concepts/thoughts/ideas require more space to be articulated. I would follow the blogs of the list of programmers that everyone is suggesting.


47

You need to do three things... Start conversations - and the best way to do this is to introduce yourself to someone and ask questions. Most folks love to talk about themselves and their opinions - even introverts! Here are a few you can try... What's your favorite session so far? Where are you from? Do you use [a technology discussed at the conference]? ...


34

Like so many of these questions, I think the answer is: It Depends There is reason to believe that taking the position that every programmer should know every line of code is misguided. If we assume for a moment that someone with a deep understanding of a piece of code will make changes 5 times faster than someone who doesn't know it at all (not a giant ...


31

(The following isn't meant to be condescending and is slightly exaggerated for entertainment value. I say all this only from having been there myself :) Networking is essentially being able to to make new professional acquaintances. To do that you need what I'd like to call social intelligence. Unfortunately many geeks and programmers aren't exactly blessed ...


28

It depends on what the domain of the problem is. If it's general stuff (i.e. simple CRUD actions, etc), then I agree with Tom Squires (anyone should be able to work on it and edit it). However... If the solution in question requires domain expertise (lots of time has either been invested in the past or a lot of research needs to be done prior to ...


27

I wouldn't make it an issue unless it became a problem. I prefer to treat my employees as adults and assume they will act professionally unless there is evidence to the contrary. For example, if someone is continually missing deadlines without a good reason I might check in on them once in a while and if they are wasting time online, THEN I would deal with ...


24

I maintain a list of over 2300 StackOverflow (SO) twitter accounts sorted by reputation. I mined the latest SO data dump for all users with twitter accounts, then calculated each user's top tags based on most votes, and finally sorted the lists by user reputation. Here is a screenshot of what the SO list looks like: I also mined the available Stack ...


23

My personal belief is people in all professions, but especially creative/problem solving professions need mental down time through out the day. Sure, you could stand behind your programmers cracking a whip and yelling, "More code!", and the project will probably get done on time and on budget, but you will get a mediocre product. They'll cut corners and ...


23

In addition to what others said so far... Stay social What I do at events like that is avoid my usual anti-social behaviours like checking my phone all the time. That's good for warding against strangers on the bus, but not so good if you want to meet people at a conference. Say hi first When you get to your next session and find a seat, say hi to the ...


17

In a team of developers it very quickly becomes clear who is productive and who is not. IMHO, banning IM or Facebook will not make bad programmers any more productive, but it certainly will negatively affect the morale of the good ones.


16

GitHub Best example of "social coding" I know of. Everyone forks everyone and everyone is okay with it! How much better could it be? Add in: Gists for snippets Markdown formatted everything Bug / Issue tracking for free Git (need I say more?) Beautiful UI Simple to use for the beginner, advanced git features for the veteran.


14

bitbucket.org Relatively clean interface. Unlimited public repositories. Unlimited private repositories.


14

But what other things that you should know before you build your first steps for a large website which will be for the community! The most important thing to know is that you'll never build a large web site. No one builds a large web site. They build a small web site which grows. Never think "big". Always think "useful". If you have the right ...


12

Somehow, I think writing a webapp is not the main concern. Much more important is thinking about how to make the damn thing gain traction. Other than that, your question doesn't probably make a lot of sense. Writing something as complex and big as Facebook is not something you can do all by yourself, and I am pretty sure that nobody has the resources to ...


10

I'm umming and ahing about using a php framework for this and how many development hours it would actually save me. If any? My instinct on this is no - simply because you said the "next Facebook" and the nature of a social network is many, many users. If you were putting together a team to do this, and you hired a CTO worth anything at all, and you ...


9

For a quickstart, have a look to this list: http://twitter.com/jvortmann/software-guru You got: Kent Beck Martin Fowler Chad Fowler UncleBob Erich Gamma .. I would then search by name, starting from the book authors you are reading. For example: i'm currently reading Professional Android Application development by Reto Meier; Googling his name + ...


9

The advantage is that not everyone needs to research and understand everything. The disadvantage is that that makes each person necessary for their own area of code, and no-one else knows how to maintain it. A compromise would be to have at least 2 owners for each area of code. Then someone can go on vacation, take a new job, or retire, and there is still ...


9

This is a horrible idea. I have worked at a company that has used this approach and it is pretty much a recipe for heaps of technical debt. The bottom line is that two heads are almost always better than one. Why? Because unless you're an idiot, you know you're not a perfect programmer and you're not going to catch every mistake you make. This is why you ...


8

If you can't trust your employees to get their work done because of the presence of distractions, then you might be hiring the wrong type of people.


8

It doesn't matter. When Facebook started, it was a small project used by a small amount of people. At this state, it didn't matter if it was full of spaghetti code, if there was a framework, a clean separation of concerns, a solid infrastructure, a high quality hardware, etc. Today, Facebook is used by lots and lots of people. And still, it doesn't matter, ...


7

A similar questions was asked, Amount of man hours to write a social network, to which I gave an answer that I will summarize here: Language: You need to not only know "a language" you need to know enough to choose one which will suit your needs. One that is: Popular. If you become the next Facebook, you're going to need a lot of developers. Facebook ...


6

I would see if you can find a local users group and if so go to the meetings. Often people will go out for a beer or ice cream afterwards and you can get to know folks. Around here (Tel Aviv) there are a few good user groups (israel.pm, Sayeret Lambda etc) They may well be where you live too, and if not try to get one started.


6

Yes, it is slightly more efficient, in the short-term. And there ends the benefits. That doesn't even come close to outweighing the cost. What happens when he's on holiday, or unexpectedly sick, or leaves, or gets hit by the proverbial bus? What happens when you want to flex resources to get one job through quicker than another? How effective can ...


6

There are at least three issues that the other answers point out; but I'd like to try and treat both of them together. The two issues are: expertise: Someone on the team has detailed knowledge about a particular field; this knowledge is independent of the specific implementation of that domain in the project leadership: Although the work of building the ...


6

Code ownership tends to prevent refactoring, create development bottlenecks and cause ego problems when code has issues that should be dealt with. I do recommend consulting with code authors before changing, even though high standard code should be well enough documented, unit tested, integration tested and system tested to make this redundant, it still ...


5

The thing about Tech Ed is that it has a wide spectrum of people in it. Some are outgoing and love the chance to meet 10,000 people. Some are there only to learn technical material and are really stressed out by all the strangers. It's a much harder place to make new tech friends than a user group or a code camp. This is made even worse by the wide variety ...


5

This is bad for a lot of reasons, I worked in a shop where they tried to change from this to something more reasonable and it was ugly. The reasons why this is bad: If the code owner takes a vacation and some big bug pops up in their stuff, it will be very difficult and time consuming to try to learn the code AND fix the bug If the code owner leaves the ...



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