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18

It is OK to make a web application using C++ IF the benefits outweighs the cost, obviously. Google, Amazon, Facebook are all built with C++ for efficiency in speed, memory and energy - aka servers costs. However as you guessed, there are drawbacks to using C++ for this. It depends on your tools though. First let me cite cppcms website on this: When ...


11

Full disclosure - I've been on the demanding side of an escrow request, so please pardon me for any overt bias. Large organizations such as gov't and utilities generally don't change software applications frequently. It's not unheard of for an application to live 10 - 15 years, with only a few version upgrades in there. They can take "sweating the assets" ...


10

This problem is called API Management and there are a number of solutions. Integrated Billing - FOSS Solutions that offer integrated billing that are Open Source, free, or charge a percentage (based on subscriptions, so no up-front fees): WSO2 API Manager 3Scale Apigee and Apigee To-Go Integrated Billing - Commercial Solutions that offer integrated ...


10

As long as you don't distribute your binaries, there is no problem with using GPL libraries (or other code) in an otherwise closed-source project. As far as the regular GPL and LGPL are concerned, providing access to use your software over a network (like in SaaS) is not considered distribution. This means that there is no problem with using (L)GPL ...


9

Keep your short releases in-house, until the customer is ready. Then, release to the customer on one of your four-week cycles. If possible, have the customer participate in software reviews between their release dates, so that you can keep your sprints on track.


7

Sprints aren't about deployment Sprints are for the developers, they are about commitments to deliverables, not about deployments by customers. The goal of a Sprint is to have a Deliverable. There is no requirement to actually deliver it much less deploy it. Every team I have been on produces many more deliverable builds than the operations team could ...


6

From the description you have provided, the answer is "no, you don't have to disclose." You are either relying upon the output of the GPL'd executable or you are treating it as a system, which are two exceptions to the viral nature of the GPL. Dig into the GPL FAQ and you'll find your answers based upon the specifics of your scenario.


6

There is not a YES or NO answer to your question. The decision to introduce a second level of indirection in the form of an xml/json API depends on what you are about to do with your project. As you mentioned, many projects go mobile these days, however, isn't there a simpler way to provide mobile functionality by simply presenting a customized version of ...


5

You offer a multi-tenant solution. You place multiple customers' (aka tenants') data and applications on a single server. They share core infrastructure. If that server went down, it would take them all down. Therefore, multi-tenant. Do not feel bad about this. Essentially all service providers are multi-tenant, by design and necessity. Every organization ...


4

In a complex system like you describe, I would say that the configuration of that system is at least as important, if not more so, than any individual component. Often in my experience, when a complex system I work on is not working, it is the configuration, not any individual component, that is responsible for the failure. An analogy I like to use is that ...


4

My advice to you...get a lawyer. You're playing with the big boys now, asking a group of strangers on a Q&A site something this important to your company is not the right way to do it.


4

You could use Piwik from http://piwik.org . It's essentially an open source, host it yourself, web analytics tool. It has most of the major features of GA and is just as easy to use.


4

The term replaces Application Service Provider and can be found in documents dating back to at least early 2001. Software as a Service (SaaS), commonly referred to as the Application Service Provider (ASP) model, is heralded by many as the new wave in application software distribution. Following the maxim that “the Internet changes everything,” ...


3

What you are trying to do is commonly known as security through obscurity, and it's generally not a good idea. You can transform parts of your PHP code to PHP extensions* if you want, but your primary motivation should be efficiency not security, as every compiled piece of code can get reversed engineered with a decompiler. As Claude Shannon put it best: The ...


3

Yes, I've been in your situation. In no way did we impose our choice on clients when that choice of analytics tool had implications for both privacy of data transfer and storage but also external/third-party use of the data. Our legal counsel's recommendations (and you should absolutely check with yours) were the following: tell clients what you're ...


3

Use SaaS: You will update your product ASAP, users will always have last version You will decide, which version of PHP and MySQL (etc) you will use It's much more easy to users to pay per month / per day, than for whole product "Cloud technologies" it's a future of IT world :)


3

Since its only useful for the one company, you should probably put a presentation together that explains your proposal, and if they are interested, have them fund the development & continued service. I dont think you should 'up front' a project of that scale without a serious committment on their part. Also, if appropriate, you might consider looking ...


3

Wordpress running in PHP with a few plugins installed brings my Winders server to it's knees. So I have no problems at all with the idea of implementing a web application in C++. Speed is a critical part of the web experience. Graphic design tents to drive the majority of web projects. PHP is an obscure scripting language that runs inside HTML. Allowing the ...


3

You're probably looking for client certificates. It depends on the cloud environment's ability to allow you manage the ssl certificates, but here is another stackexchange article about it: http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/14589/advantages-of-client-certificates-for-client-authentication


3

It's just easier, and a pragmatic solution. iFrame keeps everything in it's own semi-private window, so there's little risk of CSS or JS conflicts. Not the greatest for user experience, but simple and effective especially for internal facing apps.


2

First of all, just because someone has the code doesn't mean they can bypass your authentication by merely reverse-engineering your code. If you have a private/public encryption in place, having the code doesn't help an attacker much. On the actual question: The common thing to do seems to be handing out API keys, each of which identifies a paying customer. ...


2

Bottom line: you need to write something that the user installs on his computer (either write a Browser plug in or an active x control.) That Thing will get data from the local comp and push it to you.. (This can be trigged by your web app.)


2

Jason Lewis is spot-on regarding the two significant issues of single sign on (or user management issues) and data integration. +1 for ...heavy customization on a per-client basis. Depending on what you are offering, your integration options will vary dramatically between clients, and often even between departments at a single client. I'm at a SaaS vendor, ...


2

There are generally two big pieces to the "integrating with enterprise services" puzzle: single-sign on and data. SSO can be the easier piece, depending on what the client institution has in place. For instance: I work at a large institution with strict SSO requirements. We have an OpenID provider in place for authenticating to our SaaS vendors, and OAuth ...


2

I do not have experience with Fogbugz/Kiln so I can not directly answer the comparison question BUT I can say that Assembla is great. I have used it for a handful of projects and used both their Subversion and git which is nicely integrated their ticket and collaboration tools. It worked very well.


2

You may want to ask yourself a few questions. Do I want the app to function without an internet connection? How clean do I want the app to run? Are there any features I'd like to incorporate that are native to the devices? Do I care whether or not the app 'feels' native to the device? As an iOS developer I've had to sit down with clients and sometimes my ...


2

First, SLA is the term for providing a service at a defined level, it can include both penalties and rewards, termination of agreements and commitment to higher level of usage. Basically anything you can think to put in a contract, with terms dependent upon service levels (uptime, number of visitors, response time, failure rates,etc). Secondly, non-corrupt ...


2

A Service Level Agreement (SLA) doesn't imply a monthly or yearly service fee. A SLA lays out an agreement about things like uptime, performance, data availability, downtime notifications, support response times, and other things of that nature. A SLA with "really high requirements" might specify that the service is to be available 99.999% of the time and ...



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