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I'm assuming you are writing automated tests using an xUnit framework of some kind. If that is the case, the ideal situation is usually where each function is tested individually. This gives you several advantages: defect localization - when something goes wrong you know exactly where in the code it happened. more control over test input. You can test ...


4

You're a professional. Your employer hired you to be professional. So, treat your concerns the same way you'd want professionals you hire to treat their professional opinions. In particular, you expect other professionals to make necessary optimizations and corrections along the way, provided those optimizations don't unexpectedly increase the cost. For ...


1

Gathering requirements means just that: collecting them. Clarifying requirements means making sure that those requirements are clear and unambiguous. You need clear and unambiguous requirements so that there is no dispute with the customer over whether or not something that was asked for has been provided. One way to clarify requirements is to write ...


3

What makes me feeling bad about your scenario is exactly what you wrote in the headline and multiple times in the question text: You are the lowest developer in the chain Why is that point so important? Well, first of all, and from a purely technically viewpoint, you are certainly right. You are hired as what you call an "implementor" of things, a worker ...


1

I have never heard of an organization that didn't want it's employees to participate. You say that you are only paid to do the tasks. I sincerely doubt you have the right tasks in mind. Because you are paid to write good software. Take this responsibility. Say no to adding features if you can't support the base. Advice the customer with your expertise. ...


18

Every time you notice something like that, enter a new ticket into your issue tracking system. Make a habit to use issue tracker as a primary tool to communicate stuff like that, because from there, it will be easy to pick, evaluate and prioritize for your senior colleagues / lead / manager / whoever is responsible for tracking the issues in your project. ...


4

You do this the same way a clerk in a law office fights unethical behavior, a fast food worker fights unsanitary behavior, or a parking enforcement officer fights police corruption. Be a good example. To the extent you can, produce clean and sensible code. When given a choice, choose the one that meets your requiremets with less downside. (Be aware that ...


-5

Module is nothing but the flow of project, you have divide your project depends on subset, for example if I am creating a Facebook app the modules will be 1 Signin module 2 Signup module 3 Posting module 4 Sharing module . . . x Logout module


1

You could do either, so this is primarily opinion based. If you start with the backend, though, you should have unit tests, certainly, but also some sort of test harness that can simulate whole-flow calls to the backend. If you start with the GUI, you should have stubs or mock implementations of the backend to test your GUI against. Don't create a real GUI ...


2

As someone who has interviewed and employed graduates into programmer roles, what matters is the candidates ability to program. Having done a degree course with a substantial programming element may provide a starting point to the conversation, but I have come across many graduates with such degrees that I would not trust to write "Hello World", never mind, ...


2

They absolutely will. Especially if you can demonstrate technical competency. I've been in software development for 14 years with an IT degree (did get a comp sci master's later). In this time I've worked with English majors, computer graphics majors, electrical engineering majors, and a few others. If you know how to do the work, and are able to learn, ...


1

Bearing in mind, you can find out what you have, by reading the documentation later, I'd use the time you have to get a detailed history of the project, from various (political) perspectives. Why did it go wrong? Who's fault was it? Clearly it's irrelevant who's fault it is, but you'll learn what the approaches were that were taken and why, by someone ...


2

I'd mostly let the current team tell me. They know what you need to know better than you do. (Note that they may not care to tell you - if they are annoyed at the situation they will be able to lie to you or stonewall you and there isn't much you can do). However, to help them out if needed, I'd ask where all the resources and components of the project ...


1

I'd focus on what their current problems are, both short term and long term. Ideally get a description of the design decisions that have gone wrong and any other non-code problems as well. Basically, find someone who's grumpy at the way things have turned out and take them offsite for a whining session. Hopefully from that you'll find out what the current ...


6

I would recommend neither. Go full open-source for this one project. Your first public software release is primarily a learning experience, and you'll learn more from an open-source project than from a free trial. You need to get some experience managing your user community, predicting and responding to needs, and understanding how people will use the things ...


2

You seem to misunderstand a key part: the unreal engine remains a commercial engine. This means that they will still get the licensing fees from every developer and each game sold. The EULA even specifically states that you can't share the source with anyone that isn't also a licensee. The major benefit is that there are now programmers that are paying you ...


4

The best way is to follow separation of concerns, which means restricting the scope of your new variable to the smallest possible unit. If the new information truly has to be a new class member, and the class is too big for you to read it through and easily find all other circumstances in which you have to deal with the new field, then the class is too ...



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