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8

A few years ago I worked on an application that was written by somebody who had clearly never learned how SQL databases work. I was given a problem report to fix -- the main status summary page, which had always been slow, had now started to be so slow that it was hitting the server script execution timeout (of 3 minutes) during rendering. It seemed that ...


5

.net already uses connection pooling, so when you create/dispose a connection, you are not actually opening and closing a database connection, just fetching and returning a connection to the pool. So you don't really get any benefit by changing to Open/Close, and the using construct guarantees that the connection is returned to the pool correctly even in ...


4

1) Sql does support relational closure, which means you can use base tables, table literals, views, subqueries, CTE's, table variables and table-valued functions interchangeably in queries, and nest them arbitrarily. You can also use the resultset from a stored procedure in a query, as long as you execute the query and loads the result into a temp table ...


4

Put the data in a data base. Write a function which pulls all the data from the database and populates the arrays. Pass the populated arrays to the unchanged calc function Write a function to write a database using the resultant arrays from the calc function.


3

Is there some historical or practical reason why SQL (or more specifically T-SQL in my case) does not support the closure property in many areas where many other language families like C do? The historical reason is that Codd first defined the concept in 1970 and it wasn't turned into what we would now call SQL until 1974. Many of the things that would ...


2

Don't discount the possibility that you'll need to actually go into the database and query it directly as part of a debugging process. If you ever end up doing that, you'll definitely want to know all about the database technology and how your particular database is structured. Maybe it won't happen. But if it does (and in my experience it always does at ...


1

How much work is it to derive the data to display? If it's a fairly simple query, than re-doing it every time may be little more work than doing it once, saving the results somewhere else in the DB, and then drawing from there. Do all users see the same data? I mean, are there any parameters on this screen, or is the display the same for everyone? If there ...


1

Unless someone has a really unique way of addressing this problem, I would think they would buy something already built because there are security issues along with established ways of doing this. First of all should I use NoSQL or SQL for this kind of architecture? From an architecture standpoint, both will work, so consider security as a prime ...


1

This data can be expressed well in a relational database, so a document based database doesn't really offer an advantage Using the database's querying features to narrow down the booking to the doctor and date(s) you're interested in and doing the actual processing in the application should work well. There are perhaps a few hundred bookings per month and ...


1

5Mb seems like a trivial amount of data these days. So I wouldn't worry about pulling that out on demand, deserialising and manipulating that. Performance shouldn't be a problem given your quantities of data If there are no projected format changes for this data, I would stick to this approach.



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