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In the early days the computer system was in a room that was not accessible to programmers and most systems could only execute one program at a time (batch processing). To have your program executed you submitted it via punched cards or paper tape and came back later to get your results which was normally a print out. Programmers were rarely allowed direct ...


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Magnetic tape was first used for data storage in 1951. Hard drives were introduced in 1956. Floppy drives were introduced in 1971. The punched card had a significant head start on all of these storage mediums. By the 1970s, IT organizations were at least investigating a move away from punched cards. By the late 1980s or early 1990s, the transition was all ...


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[W]hy did programmers ever write their programs on punch cards? Didn't computer screens and keyboards already exist by the time programmers used them? We use whatever i/o mechanism our computers have. In the 1960's, paper tape was common. In the 1970's (when I started programming), paper tape was being replaced by punched cards. Yes, there were machines ...


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You may not have a very good picture of computing technology pre-1974. Time-sharing, multi-user, systems were invented in the late fifties, but they were comparatively rare through all through the 60s. Most computers ran in batch mode, running a single program at a time, with no facilities for interacting with users other than the card reader, the line ...


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The weight of history... Lets go back to the Jacquard loom, a mechanical loom invented over 200 years ago. The loom was controlled by a "chain of cards", a number of punched cards, laced together into a continuous sequence. This was a known technology and later on the US Census Bureau used a tally machine - the Hollerith machine to tally census ...


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I am so old I have used punched cards (and "editable" mark sense cards - pencil to mark + eraser to edit!) at Uni, and we submitted the deck of cards as our assignment. There was not a keyboard or terminal in sight. And it wasn't that long ago: the 80's. Where do you think the usage of the term "to punch in data" came from (although, see below)? There was a ...


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Punched cards served not only as an input/output medium, but also as a long-term storage device. You could run a program more than once by reloading the card deck for that program. There were no hard drives, no floppy drives, no magnetic tapes.


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Computers did not start off as you see them today, obviously. They were more mechanical. A punch card is used to mechanically represent binary numbers. A mechanical reading head which moves over the punch card reads a "hole" or a "no hole". These combinations of holes and no holes can be used to control the behavior of a mechanical device. There by, we have ...


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Computer time was extremely expensive back then, so anything that could be offloaded typically was.


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There are valid concerns on either side of the debate, so always consider your requirements and constraints. How much data, how many images, how large, how secure, time to recovery? Inline / BLOB storage Upside Version control / transactional consistency. This is the key semantic difference. This is handled well by the DB, so allows for point-in-time ...


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I advise against storing the images in the database. It's not what database are intended for - it isn't relational data that relates to other data. It easily takes up a huge amount of space and is difficult to manipulate when within a database blob column. I use databases to store the name, timestamps, meta data and file location. I then store and access ...


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If you are using sql server (2008 or beyond) you can store them in the database as blobs or using FILESTREAM. As other commentors have pointed out, I would not go with a propertiery store the file on disk approach as you will have to manage consistency in that scenario. A good link on FILESTREAM can be found here: FileStream Guidelines Some general ...


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So if a user were to search for books and he ends up getting a list of books along with their images before him, there will be a new call to the action method that retrieves images and a new query to the database for each image listed. I would suggest that's a Good Thing. Images take much longer to transfer than text so, rather than making the user wait ...


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Why not do both? Database is the backing, ultimate store for the image. The public side can be a simple read from db but you can easily extend that into a read-through disk cache and also take advantage of numerous infrastructure tricks to better enhance performance. The wins here are: simpler data backup -- database backups are fun and easy, no file ...



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