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6

Look at it at the other way, from the system perspective. You have a giant pool of free memory (free ram memory) where different programs can make use of. But all of their used resources should be returned sooner or later, or at least being used the entire time. When you no longer need it you should return it to the pool of free memory. Applications that ...


4

It's fairly self explanatory. The application is diminishing system memory, this memory is allocated but not useful to running code. This is analogous to a physical leak as the system memory is slowly lost (like water from a leaky bucket) to useless allocation. I'm not sure about the etymology, but it a fairly obvious analogy, so I doubt there is a clear ...


4

The terms FIFO and queue are interchangeable. In most programming languages, queue and stack terms are preferred to FIFO and LIFO, and to many programmers, they will feel more descriptive. As Nick Alexeev noted, FIFO is more common in hardware. Finally, don't use lowercase fifo: FIFO is an acronym, which means that it should be written in capitals.


3

Not necessarily. If you look at the Wikipedia Article, you'll find that a Dependency is considered a service. In practical terms, this is going to be an object of some sort (a reference type to be more exact). While that object is going to be passed to some class constructor as a parameter, not all constructor parameters are service objects, and therefore ...


2

Queue can also mean a priority queue or a timing queue where elements are pulled out based on how soon or in which order they should be handled they should be handled. This is common in event based architectures to handle timeouts. It may or may not be an actual data structure or just a virtual one that you pop an event off from. However in the context of ...


2

It is the file format and thus the extension name. It was originally file extension used by the utility shipped by PKWARE called PKZIP. It allowed multiple compression algorithms, and "zip" itself is not a compression algorithm (although bzip, bzip2, etc. are). From Wikipedia's Zip article: The name "zip" (meaning "move at high speed") was suggested by ...


1

No, swapping the values for true and false is not an OBOE (Off By One Error). You could argue it's a semantic error. OBOE occurs with indexes in arrays or loops and probably a few other areas. Swapping the values for true and false generally occurs when you're using an int to represent their value but you don't define a constant to check against. If ...



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