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3

These two types of testing are not directly related. A smoke test is a quick system test with the purpose of finding major flaws in a software artifact. For example, a test might deploy a web app to a test server, validate that it deploys and starts up, and the server can service simple requests. This would validate that the application file (e.g. WAR file ...


0

The term "smoke testing" can be thought of as a sanity check. These are quick tests to get a quick, overall view of whether or not the system seems to be working. It isn't careful, methodical testing. For example, smoke testing might catch things like obvious freezes or obvious integration problems. Black box testing is a completely different category. ...


3

Basically, in smoke testing you turn on the system, especially for the first time ever, and see whether it starts to emit smoke... which would be a sign that something is very wrong with it. It doesn't tell you anything beyond that, but it can still be valuable to avoid further effort on something that is obviously not going to work at all. According to ...


4

The Gang of Four knows two patterns which describe objects which do nothing but create other objects. One is the Factory. The other is the Builder. The difference between the two is that a Factory receives all arguments with a single method-call and usually can be reused to create more objects of the same type, a Builder has a number of methods which ...


4

Hypermedia never really got popular with REST-like APIs - to the point that when an API actually implements hypermedia navigation, the term RESTful simply isn't enough to distinguish it from any other "RESTful" web APIs. REST has become an catch-all term or any resource-based web APIs and new names like Hypermedia API have been coined to focus on ...


1

You can call it a Web API. It's a very broad term but it can avoid nitpicking about meaning of other API type definitions. The term is less technical and precise compared to alternatives like HTTP API, but that might be an advantage when talking to non-technical people. This term is also used by Leonard Richardson (who defined the Richardson Maturity Model ...


1

You can call it whatever you like, people tend to (almost religiously) latch onto any part of the REST 'spec' that you're not following and use that as a point of protest which is highly detrimental to the development. But that said, the simple fact is that there are (nearly) zero services exist that implement true REST for their API serves. In our team we ...


30

Call it an HTTP API. It conforms to HTTP standards, and doesn't have anything else layered on top (e.g. SOAP). The HTTP standards define resources, verbs, headers, content negotiation, etc. REST (REpresentational State Transfer) is an architecture with requirements that happen to be amenable to existing HTTP standards, but HTTP works on all its own. ...


17

Richardson Maturity Models goes like this POST everywhere. A single endpoint. (SOAP) POST everywhere. Multiple endpoints. (resources) HTTP VERBS. Multiple endpoints. Like 2 and returns links to resources. (RESTful) So according to the model I would call it a webservice conforming to richardson level 2 or something along those lines. ...


2

It is a CRUD interface (Create, Read, Update, Delete) over HTTP. I can't think of any authorities to back it up this assertion, so I hope you get more and better answers.



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