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Common design Algorithmic Paradigms: Divide and conquer : Recursively breaking down a problem into two or more sub-problems of the same (or related) type. Dynamic programming : breaking it down into a collection of simpler subproblems. Example: Tower of Hanoi puzzle Greedy algorithm : the problem solving heuristic of making the locally optimal choice ...


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If my domain has several Bounded Contexts, but only ONE team will work on all contexts, should I develop an Ubiquitous language for each context? or should I have only one and force to into all contexts? Changing the spelling of this question slightly; if your domain has several Bounded Contexts, but only ONE team will implement all of them... ...then ...


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There are much better answers at the SO. Basically, you provide some data collection and criteria to search. Sound algorithm catches you only the fish that matches the criteria but it may miss some data items. Complete algorithm produces a superset of requested results, which means that you receive some garbage on top of requested results. Sound algorithm is ...


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I think, what you are referring to here is not a specific design pattern, but a more general software development principle called "separation of concerns". If you constrain these concerns into more specific areas like UI logic, service usage and data processing, you are almost in the MVC/MVP world, which could be indeed seen as a pattern. On the other ...


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A bug is when the user-observable behavior differs from the documented behavior. An undesired behavior is when the user-observable behavior correctly corresponds to the documented behavior, but you would rather like to have a different behavior. "Bug": the system doesn't do what it promises "Undesired behavior": the system makes stupid promises


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A bug would be behaviour that appears because someone, somewhere made a mistake. It might be the UI designer who told the developers to implement wrong behaviour, it might be a developer making a mistake, or the compiler. On the other hand, if it was decided that the action for some button will not be implemented because it's too much cost and effort for ...


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The difference is that "bug" implies the software is doing something wrong, and that it should be able to do that thing better than it currently is. Most undesirable behaviors that I would not consider bugs would fall into one of these categories: A flaw that's inherent in the nature of the application, and simply cannot be avoided. Your mobile phone's ...


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It is known as a wart. From a comment on the original post on Stack Overflow, To be clear, this is not desired behavior, although there are good (historical) reasons for it. We (numpy devs) have preliminary plans to deprecate it in a future release, and provide easier to understand functionality that works as you might expect. See ...


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A "bug" is an informal term for a defect in software. It usually refers to something wrong in the code. If you want to use formal terms, you would want to use words like "error" (a human action or inaction that led to an incorrect result), "fault" or "defect" (an incorrect step, process, or definition), and "failure" (an incorrect result). An error will lead ...


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Both those definitions seem to refer to the same thing: a system that manages hardware and software for controlling programs. No, you did not read thoroughly: the first definition says "a computer system is a combination of hardware and software, not it manages the latter. That means a computer system includes both - the hardware (processor, main board, ...


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I think you're getting a bit too caught up in comparing unrelated types of graphs, and perhaps in thinking about data-flows rather than contract dependence. It sounds to me like you've had a discussion with someone who's talking about the call graph of a piece of software, and/or the associated control-flow dependencies between functions. In a call graph, ...


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An operating system is software, whereas a computer system is a combination of software and hardware.


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The programming uses of the verb "map" and the noun "mapper" are largely unrelated to their common uses in English, so this is a very understandable question. The programming use is also very broad, so let's start with the most concrete and well-defined meaning of "map". Namely, the higher-order map function present in most functional programming languages. ...


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It's a mathematical concept. www.thefreedictionary.com 2. Mathematics The correspondence of elements in one set to elements in the same set or another set. It's to establish a correspondence between two distinct data models. For example, you can say thay the class User is a representation of a row of the database table USER, that would be ...


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Generally, "mapping" is some association of some values to other values. It tends to imply a manual sort of process. It tends to imply a fixed association. Consider ASCII values: 'a' -> 97 'b' -> 98 'c' -> 99 ... The entire set of associations is called a mapping (noun). Having the characters and the numbers and making the associations is also ...



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