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-1

There exist methods to visualize and monitor the risk of increasing complexitiy for (big) projects and code. When they are applied reasonably hopefully a new name for the point of no return is not needed. (There is a related MOOC at openHPI: https://open.hpi.de/courses/softwareanalytics2015/) Structural Complexity is a general design problem - not only for ...


7

You call it "CRUD." Designating an app as a CRUD app is meant to indicate that a lot of its core functions center around common record-management tasks--the eponymous create, read, update, and delete. "CRUD" is not, however, meant to completely describe the app. CRUD apps have a range of activities, variations, and implementations. Some soft-delete, some ...


7

Delete is delete. If you are hiding the data behind a flag, or removing it from your DB, or writing an archive to another table, or generating a transaction-log style audit entry, or wiping the bits off the disk a thousand times using randomly encrypted values... it doesn't matter. You've still deleted the data from the user's view. As far as a business ...


0

"Never" implies a very long time. Are you even allowed to keep data that long? What are your Data Retention Policies? Do you hold any Personally Identifiable Information (PII), which must be kept up to date; holding this indefinitely (and not maintaining it) could get you into all sorts of [legal] difficulties. And then, of course, there's the simple ...


1

One interface I saw had options to Retire (soft-delete) or Delete (actually remove) data from the database.


1

The general term for having off-line "child" databases is replication. I don't believe there is standard term for those child databases only containing a defined part of the central database. Call it partial replication, if you like.


0

Commonly the clean-up of a unit test is called the tear-down, which doesn't lend itself particularly well to this case but you could call them untorn-down. In C# there is the concept of the IDisposable interface whereby the Dispose method is called to clean up unmanaged resources. You could appropriate this terminology and say that such tests are undisposed....


4

According to the Java Language Specification s. 8.1.3, "An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static" As this is the most authoritative document on the Java language, the answer to your question is no, it is not incorrect to use this term.



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