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30

The idea of being dependent on an IDE to understand code at such a basic level seems anathema. It is not a question of understanding your code: given sufficient time, you can always locate the right variable with a basic text editor or even in a printout. As far as understanding the code goes, the IDE dependency absolutely does not exist. Locating your ...


22

Vim is a really good tool once you familiarize yourself with it. It starts up faster than any IDE or text editor I've used, and it has syntax highlighting and it indents the code correctly in most cases. It also helps you focus on the coding process itself, you won't be using the mouse at all to deal with it, that'll save you a lot of time when you're just ...


20

This is a changing space, every tool has its place in a professional's toolbox, it takes a true professional to know when each tool is appropriate to use. That said, not all tools are made the same, Dreamweaver was cutting edge a decade ago, there are better tools today. Tools like Flux and even Coda are invaluable for rapidly developing high quality code ...


20

Visual Studio is so convenient that after working with it for a while it is difficult to use a different IDE. It has a lot of handy tools and a bunch of plugins available, so practically it has every feature you would need. On the other hand, whatever language you learn, it is recommended to use command line at the beginning, so you can better understand ...


19

Refactoring facilities (Renaming affects dependencies/Extract Method/Extract interface etc.) Intellisense (or any other code completion functionality) Error checking (the IDE actually knows its symbols) No setup hassle Integrated compiler Integrated debugger Better navigation to and from references/declarations Project templates / file templates GUI ...


15

Learn elisp. It allows you to program any shortcut you can think of. Any time you find yourself performing a multi-step process for something useful, you make a function out of it and bind it to a hotkey combo. It lets you experiment with functional programming - learning a new paradigm is a good way to expand your horizons.


15

LaTeX is what you need. MiKTeX - for Windows. Text Editors Kile - for Linux. TeXnicCenter for Windows. Documentation Free LaTeX documentation. Complexity comparison


15

Importance of vi is that you will always find it on any flavor of UNIX (standard both in SysV and BSD flavors) or UNIX-like system. Note however it might be original vi, not vim. You're not guaranteed to have any other editor installed. Also in Linux it's in /bin, so it's available even if /usr failed to mount.


15

Essentially it comes down to the fact that you can do whatever you want without ever leaving the keyboard. There are lots of key bindings that let you do lots of things. There is a steep learning curve for those used to graphical (mouse) editors as it is a very different way of doing things. However, once you get familiar with it, you can move around and ...


13

10 X more productive? Not likely. I tend to think the multiplicative factors are more like 1.1, which does add up after a while. What Steve Yegge is talking about is really a reflection on being an expert in Emacs, and those are very rare. People who are achieving this multiplicative effect are actively customizing their Emacs experience by writing elisp ...


12

I've been using emacs for the last 10 years (from and to), and I can only say that you are absolutely right. Back in the days, I used gnus and the w3 browser, but clearly they are no longer up to it when compared to dedicated programs. But, obviously, you cannot run Chrome in text mode so this is where emacs wins. And even there, I'd rather use lynx/elinks ...


11

Are you a fast touch typist? Do you often wish for more keyboard shortcuts to make edits? Does the time you spend editing interrupt your train of thought? Do you find little things about your editor that you wish you could customize to work just the way you like it? Do you not mind spending potentially a lot of effort up front if it means it will save ...


10

BlueJ and Greenfoot are expressly designed for beginning students. I can't vouch for them because I have not used them, but I suspect that these will be less confusing for novices than "turning on" eclipse, netbeans or intelli-j.


9

Don’t forget scriptability. I’m not talking about plug-ins here (although these are great, and in fact far superior in scope and power to other editors). I’m talking about the fact that every keyboard command can be arbitrarily combined using movement commands. For example, d deletes characters. dw deletes a word (in forward direction) and dd deletes the ...


8

For example, at Facebook, the guy next to me was using Vim, and the guy next to him was using Emacs. Both of them were quick and productive as hell, and I attribute this not to the editor they were using, but to their own intelliigence and attitude. This remark rings very true, and is somewhat applicable to every kind of productivity tips. People who ...


8

Check out this SO page, it has enough tips to boost your Emacs productivity by at least 2x: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/60367?tab=votes&page=1 Also, you absolutely positively must use Org-mode if you're an Emacs user: Org: Your Life in Plain Text EDIT: Unfortunately, it seems the SO moderators not only closed the first question/link, but ...


8

This evidence is anecdotal, of course, but your question explicitly calls for anecdotal evidence. I'm a student doing research in an academic lab which involves scads of scientific computation as well as writing. In such an environment (think: python, SQL, academic special-purpose command line utils, text files, LaTeX/BibTeX), learning emacs made roughly ...


8

LaTeX is good at making slides, and is very convenient for people who know how to program. There are a few slide packages around, as described for instance at http://math.asu.edu/support/doc/latex/slides.html. Syntax highlighting is also available.


8

I've been using vi/vim for nearly 30 years now, and I must say I've never found the mode switching an issue. And you don't think emacs has modes???? As to your question, I really couldn't say. I suppose my work pattern is: open a file move around in command mode until I find the right place go into insert mode and write some text go into command mode ...


8

I can't tell you how often I switch modes, because it's almost second nature. It's not something I do consciously and I think most people agree on this. I did remap Caps Lock to Esc and it is much better, highly recommended. Maybe the first week was like that as you paint it. I forced myself to use it for everything and it stopped being frustrating after a ...


8

The big difference between an IDE and a general text editor is that IDE's understand the programming language you are working with and can autocomplete functions/methods, check for errors like wrong type and incorrect grammar. An IDE also has tools like a compiler integrated so that you can compile and run your program with commands in your IDE. But I think ...


8

I think you have some misunderstandings about Reflective Practice and how it might apply to programming. At it's simplest form, Reflective Practice is about reflecting upon a task after it has been completed. Programming is not about typing, it's about thinking through a design and solving a problem in a programmatic fashion. Typing is an after-effect of ...


8

Many Python programmers prefer a text editor approach to coding, using something like Sublime Text 2 or vim, where it's all about the code, plus command line tools and direct access and manipulation of folders and files. That's great, but it misses the point of the VS IDE. The point of an IDE like VS is rapid development support via strong code tools ...


7

I don't even use the built-in therapist that much, but I do use Emacs and I like it, not because of it's comprehensive nature but because it is endlessly configurable and powerful as a text editor. Also I know a lot of the keystrokes for it. Successful text editing is all about the keystrokes. If you want to develop your productivity with it, Steve Yegge ...


6

First, you can take a look to this article: Wikipedia ― Comparison of JavaScript-based source code editors. For more, here is some tools that seem to fit with your request: All of these software are downloadable, and usable on a local server. EditArea ― Download ― Demo as FileEditor who is a Yii Extension ― (Apache Software License, BSD, LGPL) Here is ...


6

The editors Jeff Atwood is talking are editors we may expect to have in future. I believe he hadn't any existent one in mind, but maybe I'm wrong. This being said, the tabs vs. spaces issue he's talking about is largely solved by some today's IDEs. Visual Studio, for example: Adjusts spaces for you, making it easy to keep the same formatting in your code ...


5

Emacs was never intended for the mass market. It is designed for efficient use by people who have taken the time to learn how it works. That said, one size does not fit all, so you may not like emacs even after you learn more about it. EDIT: My two favorite features of emacs besides editing text are the shell mode, and gnus. After getting frustrated with ...



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