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59

Google Google started using Python heavily and reinvesting in development of the language. But it doesn't have corporate backing or a killer feature that would explain a sudden rise to relevance. Google is the corporate backing. As for features Python is an OOP interpreted cross platform fast1 language. What's not to like? It's another excellent tool ...


31

1. UX: message boxes are mostly evil Alert boxes are bad in all cases from the UX point of view. In desktop apps. In web apps as alerts or inline JavaScript messages. Everywhere. You can read About Face 3 by Alan Cooper¹ if you want to know why; it explains very well how does this interrupt the workflow and annoys the user, and how nearly every alert box ...


29

It really is just Apple. Look at the rest of the programming world, and you'll see that no one (within a reasonably small margin of error) outside the Apple ecosystem is using ObjC. You didn't see much growth in Java to correspond with Android for a few reasons: Java was already very popular, so there's less to gain, especially in a system that reports ...


26

One of the major innovations in FP that has resulted in the "explosion" of interest is monads. In January of 1992, Philip Wadler wrote a paper called The Essence of Functional Programming which introduced monads into functional programming as a way to deal with IO. The major problem with pure, lazy, functional programming languages was utility in ...


21

I don't think so. Basically most of the NoSQL solutions seem to store key value pairs more or less. If you want to report on something, it is much easier to join a few tables together then to figure out how to string a whole bunch of key value pairs together. Also many of the products have their own API so the skills don't translate as well as SQL. ...


20

In my opinion, there is absolutely nothing going for the success of the Objective C other than the mega-hit status of the iOS platform. Having been around for ages, the language at 26 is probably older than many participants who program it. It did have a circle of faithful followers, but their ranks seldom crossed the single-digit percentage milestone. ...


19

I started using Python around 2001, and more seriously in 04/05, and more seriously a little later on. I can remember a few things happening that shifted the attitude towards Python and made it more viable as a web development language. FCGI happen, and then WSGI. Prior to that you had to run Python scripts as ordinary CGI, which was not fast enough. ...


19

Resisting change isnt a bad thing, or a good thing. It entirely depends on what the 'change' is, dont you think? The thing is, older developers have seen technologies come and go, and know that there's often better things to do with one's time than delve into a technology that will likely just end up as a footnote in programming history. There are ...


14

In the late 80ies/early 90ies computers became powerful enough for Smalltalk-style OOP. Nowadays computers are powerful enough for FP. FP is programming at a higher-level und thus often - while more pleasant to program in - not the most efficient way do solve a certain problem. But computers are so fast that you don't care. Multi-core prorgamming can be ...


13

NoSQL puts the burden of managing your data directly upon the programmer to work with the information primitives whatever NoSQL database provides. Think of a relational database as a ready-to-use package of information management functions within its framework of storage and computation. Programming a NoSQL system is a lot like having the parts of a ...


11

Here my reasons: dynamic typing: Yes, it's the reason for many to prefer groovy. but static typing has it's advantages, i.e. in readability. performance: In my experience some groovy-applications are significantly slower than java-apps. PermGenSpace: We had problems with PermGenSpace-Errors using grails-webapps on Tomcat. Maybe less an Groovy and more a ...


9

A key problem relating to the maintenance of legacy systems is the lack of people who a) are up to speed on those systems and b) willing to continue maintaining them. I recently asked a question along similar lines regarding whether younger programmers were interested in mainframes at all. The consensus leaned towards no. Maintaining legacy systems is ...


8

Most businesses are already ignorant of technical debt, and don't even realize things are bad until it literally collapses around them and sends them into bankruptcy (if it ever gets to that point). I've actually seen that happen, and it wasn't pretty; what made it worse was the fact I repeatedly tried to make the business owners aware of the mounting ...


8

The reshuffle in TIOBE index in 2004 is down to Google changing their search. There really isn't much you can learn from TIOBE - it's utter nonsense. I don't believe there has been any sudden jump in Python popularity. Certainly not because one company happens to use it internally for some of their stuff.


7

Not anytime in our present careers. SQL syntax may change a few more times, but the relational model is a strong one, and SQL is a sufficient API (yes I said API), and without a fundamental computational database shift, I think SQL or it's children's syntax will be here for a long time. 2008 was the last year that I was directly involved with FORTRAN (77 ...


7

I'm not using Groovy because I don't see the need for it. Seeing as it is run on the JVM and I already know Java pretty well, why would I invest my time in something that is pretty much the same anyway. But I realise that I can't be a one trick pony for my whole career. That's why I have started to learn Python. When I was looking for a new language to ...


7

Todays need for distributed computing. FP uses functions as building blocks, which don't have state, so invoking them n times with the same parameters should return the same value always, they don't have side effects. Thus, you can send the same function to a bunch of machines to perform and have the doing the work in parallel. In OO paradigm, this is ...


7

I'm having a discussion with someone quite older than me, so I have no place in telling him what is wise. So why are you trying to give him advice? If there is a clear need for a new technology, chances are good that Old Boy will pick it up faster than the n00bs, by standing on a tall stack of experience. If not, well, then there's probably no point in ...


6

We're moving to an era where multi-core processing isn't just something done in the back rooms of science labs or on specialty hardware. It's now being done with commodity processors. Functional programming, at least most of the variants I've been exposed to, generally attempts to push a view on side-effect free, stateless computational units. This is the ...


6

It almost seems like there's a trend against cross-platform kits. If people want to write once, run anywhere, they tend to use HTML - make a web site. People are only using the platform toolkits when a native look and feel is highly demanded, for example on the iPhone. So if the whole reason you're bothering with the non-web app is to get native look and ...


6

jQuery is a fantastic DOM manipulation tool. What I have found though is that it is helpful to pair it with a good JavaScript templating tool (Knockout.js is one of my favorites because of the declarative data binding-like workflow it uses) precisely to do as little low-level manipulation as is possible. That said, jQuery has fantastic array looping with ...


5

The miles of tubes, wires and iron beneath New York and other U.S. cities are getting older and could become dangerously unstable. For the anecdote, the same argument was made in Paris in the 16-17th century. So many holes and tunnels had been dug underneath it (in addition to the natural holes due to the geology of the area) that an occasional building ...


5

Having done quite a bit of Groovy programming and given it a "good go" I now prefer the "pure Java" approach for the following reasons:- Debugging -- the debugger walks you through tons of internal groovy code. I know there are some options to filter this out but they are far from perfect and either don't filter out all the internal code or skip over some ...


5

The major problem as I see it is as you already pointed out by referencing IE, is getting everyone to play nicely together. This can be difficult when you start to bring several large players together (Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Apple, etc). Any attempt at standardisation needs to be taken on board by everyone in the end, otherwise it's hardly much of a ...


4

Current relational databases are not purely relational but spoil relational algebra at several places (NULLs, duplicated rows etc.), so referring to the relational model to defend relational databases is no valid argument. Nevertheless relational databases are popular for good reasons. There will just be some more special types of databases or additional ...


4

There are too many NoSQL solutions for all of them to succeed. All the ones I have looked at are flawed in some way. The main issue is infrastructure, the next issue is reporting. Right now I can hire a professional with SQL tuning expertise. There just aren't the numbers of those people with NoSQL expertise. Reporting is a mess and normally requires lots ...


4

This is already a big problem. And it shows no signs of changing. In the 60s and 70s large institutions of all kinds went from doing accounting on paper to doing accounting on computing systems. Overwhelmingly they chose COBOL. Most are still using updated versions of those COBOL systems. See http://cis.hfcc.edu/faq/cobol for some statistics on this ...



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