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44

While the question was "Are the purposes of the languages the same?", the real question is: "How can we make web programming better from where we are?". Both projects try to do this considering programming language (TypeScript makes a small but very clean step, Dart makes the more revolutionary move that is still moving) interoperability with existing js ...


40

Quoting Bob Nystrom: TypeScript seems nice if you like JS semantics or have a large JS codebase that you're invested in but you're having maintenance problems at scale. It's path for success is much smoother since it's (mostly?) backwards compatible with JS. Dart is taking a riskier bet. It's farther from JS in a lot of ways which is, I ...


32

Looks to me like it's a statically-typed, class-based language that compiles down to JavaScript. It's a good idea, and one that others have had as well. The advantages should be obvious to anyone who's developed in both statically-typed, class-based languages and in JavaScript: First and foremost, a compiler. Being able to check for obvious correctness ...


19

The short version: CoffeeScript if you much prefer Python or Ruby-style syntax and you're uncomfortable with JS's uncomplicated approach to OOP TypeScript if you actually like JavaScript and find the idea of using Microsoft's kludge for the problem their own browser versioning approach created appealing and maybe it's really only not having the word ...


15

Quoting Scott Hanselman: People have compared TypeScript to Dart. That's comparing apples to carburetors. TypeScript builds on JavaScript so there's no JS interop issues. Dart is a native virtual machine written from scratch. Dart interops with JavaScript...but it's not JS. It doesn't even use the JavaScript number type for example. From Why ...


15

There are a few good reasons to use TypeScript, as far as I can see. First and foremost, as Mason Wheeler said, a compiler. Or rather all the checking a compiler does. JSLint and other tools are useful, but misses some problems and are sometimes plain wrong. I certainly welcome this "innovation". Then there is a real type system, improving readability and ...


9

Those aren't going to be the two options for a while. If you use TypeScript, you're going to need to know JavaScript anyway because, for the foreseeable future, there isn't going to be a tool for debugging TypeScript in the form it was written. So it's JavaScript or TypeScript AND JavaScript. So I suggest learning JavaScript first while keeping an eye on ...


4

We had JavaScript, then we had Flash, then we had Silverlight and then HTML5 ownd them all. This is simply NOT true. Html5 does not own them, it introduces new markups that simplify usage of multimedia, and explores advantages of new era browsers (like using hardware acceleration while rendering html). So what is the motivation behind TypeScript? ...


3

Had to chime into this discussion with my own finding lately. 1st: TypeScript MS has taken a nice approach in the fact that you can easily jump in and out of TS and JS. We mainly use AngularJS for our development and have found while not much documentation exist for converting Angular to TypeScript. It has been a nice addition to incorporate TypeScript ...


3

It may be treated as a tool to manage javascript development rather than a total new language that compiles to JS. It do not want to be a server side development language like Dart, and not have a different syntax like CoffeeScript. It did not want to take a popular language(and it's core library) and compile it to JS like GWT or script#. TypeScript even ...


3

I would use sessions. You can store the information you need after they've logged in, be it a token given by the login service or even just an isLoggedIn boolean value. Then, you can check in pages that need it (Inheriting from a base page class is great for this) that the information is there. If not, kick them back out. So, in your code that processes ...


3

There appears to be little at the moment out there for Typescript. Adding Intellisense for a given language is a hugely nontrivial endeavor. Miguel de Icaza (of Mono fame) puts it: But TypeScript only delivers half of the value in using a strongly typed language to Unix developers: strong typing. Intellisense, code completion and refactoring are ...


2

1) I think angularjs is a great option. There are some great testing libraries like jasmine 2) Although it is possible to use typescript with angular, http://www.piotrwalat.net/using-typescript-with-angularjs-and-web-api/ I'd recommend finding a pure angular developer. 3) Resharper works with angular but jetbrains also makes a great ide called webstorm ...


2

Take a look at http://www.asp.net/web-forms/videos/authentication. It seems like its geared towards a newcomer audience. (Yes, it says web-forms, but the information is applicable to a broader scope). Asp.net already has libraries built in for the basics. You should look into RoleProvider and MembershipProvider. Basically, you should authenticate each ...



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