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30

It matters a lot. Good UX increases productivity. If UX is good, the company can focus on "how to do their stuff" instead of "how to use your software to do their stuff", and it takes less time to teach new workers. And, good UX will drastically decrease the number of support tickets, so you can spend more time on resolving serious issues rather than "how ...


23

This is old research but 10 seconds is bad: http://www.useit.com/papers/responsetime.html from the page: The basic advice regarding response times has been about the same for thirty years [Miller 1968; Card et al. 1991]: •0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that ...


13

I had similar experiences with you. I believe the following dynamics/factors are in place with enterprise software and UI. As stated in another answer the person that will sign the purchase of the software is different than the person that will use it and different that the person that will maintain it. So purchase is made based on "features" or some other ...


11

Absolutely it does - only the trouble with "Enterprise" software is that it is sold entirely on feature sets, to managers who don't have to use it (or even look at it), by smarmy salesmen who know all the tricks of getting such software sold. This is one reason why a lot of companies moved to open-source software - apart from the other reasons like cost, ...


11

The interaction designer UX != UI You need a experienced interaction designer to deliver good user experience, contrary to popular belief that is not a programmer. For all of you programmers who think they can do UX (that includes me) let me say this. Getting good at interaction design requires at least as much time as getting good at programming. How ...


11

However in Scrum you are only supposed to have user stories that provide value to the user. Value isn't measured only in lines of shippable code. You seem to be implying that having a well designed UI doesn't provide any value. Of course it does. Obviously there's value to the end user, but there is also value to your development team, which is a ...


10

The main disadvantages are these: You are pipe-lining: if your designers are late, your developers are left without work; if your developers are late, your designer will eventually work more than one iteration in advance. It's not a stable situation - it is not sustainable. Your designers are working in advance, you are paying costs for stories that may or ...


9

More than two seconds without an hour-glass and I'm already pretty skeptical. Different people will have some different expectations but I would expect 10 seconds with no feedback to even acknowledge that I clicked a button or whatever would annoy almost anyone. Whether or not it matters to annoy your users is another question.


8

I have encountered this problem many times in my career - the trick is to first be aware that it is a problem, and acknowledge it. Once you've done that, it's easier to stop making overly complex interfaces. The user interface is also a part of software engineering, but perhaps for many software engineers not as much interesting. However, there are many ...


5

I like it, for two reasons: it seems to work for you; it's hard to argue with success! the UX team takes the story and starts the conversation early - and conversations are kind of the point of stories


4

I suppose you could argue about how programmers and designers have different mindsets or different personalities, or argue about left-brain versus right-brain and creative versus logical, but really, there are three fundamental issues: Programmers' work is their software. They care about it; they devote their attention to it; they can get excited about ...


3

Maybe it depends who pays for the software. Enterprise software might be bought by the IT director. They probably just look for a list of features. They'll have a hard time persuading their CEO and board to pay more money for usability. Consumer software is bought by the consumer, or paid for by advertising. Either way, usability is very important. ...


3

I write enterprise software and UX matters to me and my team an awful lot, but in my experience UX has not been as important a factor as it should on the sales side. Typically the people signing the cheque to pay for the software are not the people using it, so what they're interested in is not ease of use but that their high-level actions are defensible. ...


3

I suggest to organize work of the UX guy in the same way as the rest of the team. He should be considered an equal member of the team, participate in standups, and communicate closely with programmers. Ideally, the mock-ups should be done at least one sprint in advance, but for smaller features it might make sense to consider creating mock-ups as a subtask ...


3

In my opinion this is somehow special case which must be handled in the special way. Scrum master will definitely not participate in this - it is not his role at all. Team is usually group of developers and most of them has no experience with UX and it will be waste of their time to force them to this. You will hire UX expert and the expert will not be the ...


3

I completed my master's in Software Engineering from Kansas State University via Distance Learning. I know my degree was in a different area, but I thought I would share my experiences in completing a degree online via distance learning. Couple of thoughts on distance learning: Find a program that will allow you to complete the degree completely online. ...


3

A basic requirement of Scrum is that the scrum team has all the skills needed to create a potentially releasable product. In the situation you describe, this is not happening. The UX team is not producing potentially releasable product and the scrum team are not capable of producing vertical slices of functionality as they do not have all the required ...


3

There are two issues here, one about user centered design and the other about sprint alignment. First: User stories should be aligned with user needs, not just backlog. The UX stories need to have clear value to users. This does not require complete specification, and a short statement such as, "Users will have easier access to account activity on a ...


2

As I understand it, an Information Architect decides how information will be organized and presented on a web site. This would include navigation, aggregation, presentation (more what is presented than how) and access control (including security and filtering). Think of them as responsible for "content design", as opposed to "site design".


2

What do the intended users of this application think? If they're OK with it, then don't worry. Some applications that have to process lots of data, it's OK for a window-open command to have a bit of a delay before opening. If it's possible to add a splash screen or a progress bar or something to indicate to the user that it's working that would be good. I ...


2

I am subscribed to Jakob Nielsen's alertbox (mostly because of his criticism on annoying web design practices) and I recall I have recently read some articles on topic (although I hardly have a slightest understanding of the whole agile development process), maybe they would be of any use for you: Agile User Experience Projects Agile Development Projects ...


1

Unfortunately, the definition of "good" in many cases turns out to be "what looks slick in a demo". I used to work on enterprise systems, and most of the UX design docs ran along the lines of "make this work like Facebook/Twitter/Angry Birds". We had some incredibly popular features in the last system I worked on that were absolutely horrible -- expensive ...


1

The cost of such software, both initially and set up costs tends to be very high, once implemented it's unlikely that a business will start to use it and then stop based on the UX. This won't be so true of consumer level software where the cost of switching will be less prohibitive. This means people have to stick with stuff that would otherwise be dropped ...


1

I agree that deferring final UI decisions until later is the way to go in this case. Disclaimer: I am assuming, based on the question, that "final UI design" is a story in and of itself. Also, the fact that you have a dedicated UX designer lends credence to this since that person will be dedicated to working on these features. If the user story states ...


1

Firstly, consider yourself lucky for actually having a UX designer :) I'm not sure I agree with your definition of "shippable," though. Your definition isn't a bad one, it just might be a tad strict. If you have all the functionality coded in with a decent (but still sub-optimal) user experience you're already on par with most production-grade software. ...


1

If the interview is for JS experts I would expect questions like this: - How do you work with javascript as if it was OOP? - How do you test? How do you automate it? - How do you make inheritances in JS? - What is an observer, give an example of how/when to use it in JS? - What is the difference between apply and call?


1

Of course it matters, but companies simply learned to live with it. Instead of creating pressure through demand on developer companies to create applications with good UX, they accepted that most, if not all, business software has bad UX. It is hard to tell if managers and businessmen see any kind of reason for good UX or are they simply ignorant of it.


1

For "textbook Scrum": First off, Scrum Masters don't collaborate with Product Owners - well not in any sense other than that the entire team, including the SM and PO collaborates to build the system. Secondly, Scrum teams are supposed to be homogeneous with cross functional team members. So you wouldn't have a "UX Guy". Also, you probably wouldn't ...


1

Just have dropped by this topic. Take a look to the following product as example of quite good UI for query building: http://easyquerybuilder.com Unfortunately, they don't have Flex version as I know.



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