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5

You can create separate Git repositories for each library, publish them, then use Git submodules to link them to the main repository. git submodule add submodule1_url directory1 git submodule add submodule2_url directory2 git commit -m "add submodules" Working with submodules is a little more complex. After cloning the repo, you need to clone the ...


2

My place uses tags for releases and hotfixes, where hotfixes are a letter subset of the current release. Ie release/1.0.1 hotfix/1.0.1a hotfix/1.0.1b release/1.0.2 and so on. It helps keep merge points grouped together by a common value so you can be sure what was put in where. Certainly, it creates overhead because you're reverting multiple commits, ...


6

Alice should handle this situation by rejecting the pull requests which also change the version number (both of them). Collaborators who are not the maintainer should not be changing the version number - that is the job of the project maintainer.


5

If Alice is the maintainer of the project, then Alice and Alice alone should be the one that increments the version. Increasing the version number means a release, and Alice is the one to decide when to release - not Bob and Carol. Whatever code Bob and Carol contribute, you can be 99.99% certain it'll still work even if they don't increment the version ...


-1

One advantage of storing tests in a separate repository is if tests developers should be granted read-only permissions to the tested code, and read/write permissions to the tests.


1

I will not call it a "pattern" per se. It's only a convention that has stuck over the years with web developers. There is no benefit from naming a folder something else other than app, and vice versa. I can only think back to Rails when thinking of the start of this convention. I think it was a means to separate the app's source code from the cource code ...


1

Not as such; There is not one standard versioning scheme. As such, each project tends to choose a versioning scheme that fits their development/release model (and this is perfectly fine, as long as the versioning scheme is known, consistent and respected by developers). Here are some version examples I've used over the years: Linux/OSS - style version ...


2

It appears to be fairly common, yes. Have a look at the Wikipedia article on software versioning. Quote below is from that page: Designating development stage Some schemes use a zero in the first sequence to designate alpha or beta status for releases that are not stable enough for general or practical deployment and are intended for testing or ...


2

The important thing here is to have a consistent workflow which can be easily followed by both newbies and veterans in your organizations. Decide on a process which meets your requirements and ensure that the workflow makes sense for both trivial and more complex changes. That said, there are a few standard workflows out there. Here's a few of them: ...


0

Reintegrating several times a day into the mainline is a fully valid strategy - it has indeed a name, it is called continuous integration. If this is a good strategy for your team or not depends mainly on how well your automatic tools for quality assurance are, and if your team is used to deliver "baby steps". To apply CI with sucess, you should have an ...


2

While most current answers are in favour of conditional compilation instead of branches, there is one scenario where there is a clear benefit to using branches: if you (now or later) decide to make the source code of the basic version available, including all the version history but excluding all the premium features, then you can do so with the branches ...


0

In “hardware” this is done often, they are systems sold to control the mess, sorry I can’t remember what they are called. Once the “mid range” washing machine ships, it’s code is not change other than for a very important bug fix, even when the same code gets changed in the “low end” washing machine that ships a few months later. Customers don't expect to ...



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