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11

This is very possible. If you have defined an identical namespace and type name on different assemblies (or in your project and the added assembly), you will get a conflict with any code that tries to use one or another of these types. If you ensure you have unique namespaces, as do your references you wouldn't have this problem. Another possibility has ...


6

Stepping through the code can be great at determining functionality. But I have found the more complex an application is, the more likely you are to be bounced around in the debugger and get completely lost. I would focus on understanding the business rules of a particular piece of functionality of the application. Ideally, focus on the simplest part. ...


3

Most overwhelming systems, in my experience, have at least a few key parts that seem scariest. I pick one and try to understand just that one. Knowing that key part makes it easier to understand its related parts. My favorite approach to doing this is to use a sequence diagram. To me, a sequence diagram provides me with the picture I need to understand how ...


3

Seeing as nobody else mentioned this, you asked: what are the possible ways to mitigate this There is a clean solution just for this case, without constraints, and without annoying workarounds. You can define Assembly alises so that the compiler would know which ones to refer to in the right place. Have a look at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ansonh/archive/...


2

Yes, this is very possible. Let's say you added a reference to some DLL which uses the old version of Lucene.Net and you want to include the latest version. You could solve that problem by using extern aliases: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173212.aspx


2

Like you, I always step through the lines in the code base to get a basic feel. I know how you feel, one time I got hired in the 10th iteration of a large scale web project. Its architecture was one of the prototype's for http://webformsmvp.com/ . So it was totally new and we we're using commerce server 2007 too, no one in the country had experience with ...


2

How can I follow the code to low level functionality in order to get a better grasp of what is going on at a high level? Short answer: you can't. Longer answer: Any non-trivial application is going to be too big very soon for you to try and understand it in a bottom up manner. This gets worse as soon as a framework and/or patterns like observers are ...


1

ASP.Net is a complicated stack to understand as you have C# and OOP (which you are already familiar with) but you will also have to grasp the web specific technologies like Page Lifecycle, HTML, CSS, HTTP and Javascript/jQuery. So it is natural to be overwhelmed and it seems the application is not properly designed as well. But that is the reality in most ...


1

Instead of diving into the details of security authentification too soon, I would strongly recommend to focus on the "real" or "business" use cases first, and what kind of application system you have in mind (in terms of number of expected users, expected lifetime of the application, general security requirements depending on the types of data available, ...


1

You can put as many different versions of an assembly as you want in the Global Assembly Cache provided that they are strong-named. This may help you if you want different applications to use different versions of an assembly, machine-wise. However using different versions of an assembly in ONE application will still get you in trouble. What is the reason ...



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