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A library which is created for .NET Fw 4.0 (or before, down to 2.0) should be (in most real-world cases) usable from any 4.5 project (the opposite is not true). So as long as there is no compelling reason to upgrade a library to .NET Fw 4.5, I would recommend to stay at 4.0, at least as long as you have at least one project which is 4.5 based which uses that ...


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The proper answer in 2014 is none of the above. First, that default file save location has no real meaning in life -- I suspect it is just Microsoft following their own rules about where programs should save things by default. As for how to deal with cross-cutting dependency projects, the right answer is to treat them as projects in their own right with ...


7

Your watch window is displaying the public properties of your method's objects, including "p.Zet". When this getter is called by the debugger, "z" gets incremented as specified by the code. The watch window is refreshed every time the debugger stops, and if you step into a method rather than over, it stops more often. Incrementing a state variable in a ...


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If a file 'X' can be thrown away and always completely re-generated from files that are in source control, then the general rule is that file 'X' should not be placed in source control. The main exceptions to this rule are: There are rare scenarios where the file needs to be edited manually and those edits need to be preserved. If generating the file is ...


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The only good reason to have more than one project, is if you need to share a set of classes and files across multiple applications. If projects are used by only one application, they shouldn't have been made in the first place. Use namespaces instead. Save yourself the trouble of circular references, dll overhead, and project confusion when looking for ...



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