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I would suggest you rather use a Win Form app for game. If you use Console you will need to refresh (clear and redraw) the console each time you want to change display - that is with change in each second. On a win form you can directly put a timer control and start the timer on game start (button click, form load - as per your need). When timer tick event ...


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I recommend a Single Solution Approach -- especially for the start of a new project. (You can get more complicated later on, iff you need to.) MS itself has ought to say on that matter: Structuring Projects and Solutions v2002 Structuring Projects and Solutions v2007 My experience is (as MS says): This structure simplifies development because all of ...


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You can probably make it work. But, I find when using coded UI, or other test frameworks you are quite dependent on changing the code to make the various buttons and other elements easy to pick out and interact with. I think you will find it easier to just buy an off the shelf automation product


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Well, obviously you can seperate them into two solutions, add another project in solution, or have them in same project. I will tell what I would. IMHO, if you want to take advantage of Sessions in IIS and/or hide authentication process within API, write angular in Visual Studio as well. VS2015 has a pretty good integration(intellisense) with angular if you ...


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If you are into TDD, I suggest you write up a test which will fail until the functionality gets implemented. The only downside I can see is if you are a somewhat lazy function such failing tests will contribute a lot of noise to runs and may hide actual failures behind all that.


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Once you have a rough idea of what a class or function should do, you have enough information to write tests. These tests may fail, due to the thing you're testing being broken, but that is essentially a good thing. If you prefer writing the code before you write the tests for the code (sometimes, having an implementation may yield a better idea of what ...


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You should be creating tests for all the code that you write, regardless of whether they're libraries or your application. Why ? you can assert that the code you write works the tests assert that that code continues to work as you change or add subsequent code. In short, it doesn't matter whether it's a library or an application that you're writing code ...



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