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12

Answer from a front-end perspective: Don't listen to everyone saying it can't be done, because an experimental San Francisco State University web service I co-wrote in 1996 finally went to Internet heaven a couple years ago, and never needed a single browser compatibility fix in that time; that's almost half of your 40-year goal. And this JavaScript-based ...


6

To make things as "future-proof" as possible, plan for change. That is, try your hardest not to optimize for anything other than the ability to easily change. So no normalization, no strict validation, and loose coupling galore. Use major open-source technologies. For data, closed-source systems are a major source of risk as one can't plan on which ...


5

It is difficult to imagine a situation in which being scalable is not important enough to take into consideration when building a web application, however, I imagine it could happen. If you are making a web application in order to try out new technologies, it does not need to be "production ready." Likewise if you know that this is going to be a web ...


4

OK, so I'm going to say some things here which are probably going to be pretty unpopular, but stick with me here. As this is your first project where the data and/or the application is supposed to last for 20+ years, and you are the one leading the project, you need to take a step back and think about what the odds of this project succeeding are. Because ...


4

The description on the Suhosin website is pretty clear, emphasis mine: If you are using PHP only for your own server and only for your own scripts and applications, then you can judge for yourself, if you trust your code enough. In that case you most probably don’t need the Suhosin extension. [...] Even PHP core programmers are writing insecure code from ...


3

As always in such cases YAGNI (You Ain't Gonna Need It) and KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) applies. In other words, keep your application as simple as possible, and only add features which are currently needed (don't add features which may be needed in the future). Simple systems are easier to develop, easier to maintain and are often easy to scale.


3

Why Markdown? What is the advantage of using a markdown wysiwyg editor over an editor that just outputs HTML? Because there are cases where you can't use a WYSIWYG editor, and should revert to text mode. Example: diff of a question or an answer on Stack Exchange. Sometimes, you can simply compare the rendered layout. But there are cases where the ...


3

Programmers like markup languages (Wikipedia markup, Markdown, HTML, SGML, etc.). Non-technical users like WYSIWYG editors. It has been this way since the first attempts at computerized typesetting (e.g., RUNOFF, 50 years old this year).


3

Cloud, put plainly, is a server for rent available online. As such, generally most of the types of hassles regarding setting up a server and making it accessible online while not putting the rest of your network at risk, is already handled for you. There are several types of clouds depending on what the cloud offers you: Storage clouds - They offer a ...


3

The key here is to focus on the database (as several above have said). This needs to be coherent and completely describe the operation. It needs to grow with the operation as it changes. If it is not easy to change then it will get out of date and that is the kiss of death. The rest is relatively less important. I disagree with those above who suggest ...


3

The application need not survive 40 years without any evolution. But, because it would or should be built from scratch, it could still be 'functioning'. What is the most key thing is the 'data architecture' that allows for some stability and governance as well as extensible. We've designed data architecture and taxonomy that could almost survive the end ...


2

Why are you optimizing? You seem to be concerned about memory usage. Why? Is the projected savings large enough to let you rent a cheaper VM? Is the sites' current usage threatening to bust your machine's current RAM? (And even if they are, are you confident that your going to spend less on development time for this feature than you would for just ...


1

You can't.... easily. Think about this from the user's point of view - why should their query be terminated because someone else is making another request? Fix your query to run faster so the system doesn't grind to a halt when somebody does something unexpected.


1

I believe you are trying to recreate the concept of a database management system the hard way. File I/O combined with parsing and re-parsing your data is what kills your performance. Option 1: Handle the merging yourself a) Put your master "array" into a database as a set of rows in (one or more) table(s). b) Read in your files, and merge the results in ...


1

I will not call it a "pattern" per se. It's only a convention that has stuck over the years with web developers. There is no benefit from naming a folder something else other than app, and vice versa. I can only think back to Rails when thinking of the start of this convention. I think it was a means to separate the app's source code from the cource code ...


1

Real example: Confluence, a wiki made by Atlassian. It used to have both a markdown and a WYSIWYG editor in it, and you could flip between the modes. They removed the markdown mode and I was angry because it gave me better control/ability to do what I explicitly wanted, rather than fighting the WYSIWYG editor. (I think they still have an auto ...



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