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67

In the early days of the web, CGI was indeed the only (practical) way to have dynamic content (you could do named pipes of files -- and those were used in days before cgi, but that wasn't practical at all). CGI works by sticking a bunch of information in the environment of the process that is forked and then exec'ed (and possibly some in stdin) and then ...


19

Yes, any general programming language can serve to write the server-side part of a web site. However, the qualities of a programming language, in this subject as in other things, are usually only one of many factors that contribute to its popularity. For example, I reckon that PHP became popular for websites because: It is extremely easy to upgrade from ...


9

Downloadable scripts to be run - VBScript or Javascript - always sounds very fishy to me, especially since there are too many black sheep out there abusing such things to install malware. You don't want to train anyone using your program to trust, download, and use such scripts. Unfortunately I can't think of any secure fire & forget solution to this ...


7

Am I right in thinking that a server just needs some kind of interface such as CGI to make the server and the programming language work together? Almost. You need a web server that has some kind of software to allow it to respond to HTTP requests as well. Think about how a static page is served. The server retrieves the HTTP request, finds the ...


6

First off, yes, http://www.w3.org/ is a completely upstanding site that is the repository of the documentation and specifications for html, xml, xhtml, and the like. Next, you have a significant misunderstanding about what is actually in the xhtml files. From the documentation on xhtml (notice the link): <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> ...


6

The standard solution which you have surely seen from other software vendors is to let the user download and install the software, maybe with or without the registration, but let the software itself lead the user through the registration process afterwards. Through that process, after the user is authentificated, the token is downloaded in form of a ...


6

Immutable objects in general have several benefits. The most important one is how easy is to use immutable objects in code executed in parallel. This also explains why "immutability has never really caught on in the land of PHP". State consistency is easier to obtain. Objects are easy, more natural to work with. The essential thing is how much the object ...


4

What advantages do people see in using immutable request/response objects? I agree with @MainMa's statement "I'm not sure if the slight benefit of readability compensates the possible lack of flexibility" and personally I don't see any practical and useful aspects of forcing PHP HTTP Request temporary objects or PHP HTTP Response temporary objects to be ...


4

You could, although I'm not certain I actually recommend it, embed the user's token in the filename of the installer, and put code in the installer to retrieve it. To prove I didn't make it up, Sophos anti-virus does this. Rather predictably, number one on their list of Most common Installation issues is "Renaming the installer file name". But I assume the ...


3

There are two aspects involved in this question. Packaging of your application Distribution of user tokens For the point 1, I recommend the ClickOnce deployment model. I have made assumption you have built a Microsoft .NET framework application. Even if otherwise, you could implement something similar to ClickOnce deployment in your technology platform. ...


2

Why not both? I suppose you want a quick turnaround, without waiting for the session to get stored in the database. But this does not prevent you from putting the data into the database eventually, because probably users do not register a new session at every request for prolonged periods. I'd have an in-memory cache of a limited size, a queue, and a ...


2

Generally speaking, the way this works is to have "components" that themselves have HTML structure, but allow their positioning within "cells" within the template. You might choose a layout that has a large cell and then three smaller cells beneath it, for example; you could then put a big image slider component in the big cell, and images with captions in ...


2

Some people still use it (I'm one of them). So, it hasn't been replaced. In fact, I switched to Perl from PHP.


2

When a browser makes an HTTP request, it looks like this: GET /search?q=cats HTTP/1.0 Host: www.google.com Connection: close … to which the server should send a response that looks like this: HTTP/1.0 200 Success Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Length: 1337 <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head><title>cats - Google ...


1

It mostly depends on the size of the data you return and whether the user is expected to use all the data at once. For instance, if it's a list containing hundreds of thousands of complex entries: The response served as a single JSON will be rather large, and: It is unlikely that the user will actually need to see all the data at once. Instead, the user ...


1

Yes it is. DuckDuckGo is one company that I know of that started with Perl as the server side language. I believe they are still using Perl primarily. https://github.com/duckduckgo


1

A web server is a program written in any programming language that handles "web traffic" over socket(s) adhering to standards/application level protocols (HTTP, etc). Most programming languages offer you to create a socket. Am I right in thinking that a server just needs some kind of interface such as CGI to make the server and the programming language ...


1

These URLs are references to XML namespaces. These URLs define what XML tags are allowed in the document. Every valid XML document needs to include such namespace URLs. When you are using a standardized XML format, like XHTML1-transitional, you should reference the XML namespaces of the standardization body which defined them, in this case the World Wide Web ...


1

You have many options: Basic authentication over SSL https://thoughtfulsoftware.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/pre-emptive-http-basic-authentication-with-jquery/ Create a UI with the ability to log-in, create, view and delete blog posts JQuery has JSON and AJAX capabilities built-in You just have to explore and decide which libraries to use and what to write ...


1

I couldn't convince my boss yet that this is a bad idea, am i wrong here? I feel like a web app is not the right tool for this job. And if this is indeed a bad idea, what would the best way be for me to clearly explain him that? I am really not sure this is a bad idea. To me it sounds like a good idea because your customers will get what they want ...



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