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Trello is good as a kind of software version of a Kanban board, it can be helpful for single person projects but you get most of the benefit from it when you have a team of developers, managers, etc. working on a single project. Working in a profession context I would say even on your own you need to be using at the very least: Source control I would ...


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The /Book/55/title-of-book pattern has an important benefit: it contains the title of the book, which is helpful for SEO, but also the ID, which: Won't change (unless you change the type of the ID, say uniqueid instead of int). Is the only thing needed to locate the corresponding resource. This is important when you need a shorter URI, especially when the ...


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I think the biggest benefit of hiding IDs and presenting a hash-like string instead, is to prevent records being harvested simply by incrementing the value. This isn't so much a security concern, but a deterrence to would-be data harvesters who may wish to collect or index data from your service. As for implementing this, it would be better to generate a ...


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As I was clearing up the description, a potential third option (Redesigned java class) dawned on me. So I am going to investigate it further as it looks promising with no model impact. Let me know if this is not a good option based on the use case and if you see any issues with it.


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It depends on what you intend to do with the content of the files. If you ever need to make queries based on the content of the sheets (and I am pretty sure you will have to), I really think you should consider the table solution. I think there are some ways to improve your performance issues (batch insert...).


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Perhaps consider a hybrid approach. Fetching and storing documents is the purview of document-centric or "NoSQL" databases. Perhaps store the actual spreadsheets in (e.g.) Cassandra and keep your metadata (and copies of any working data, if you only really care about a subset of the data in the spreadsheet) in Oracle. As to your memory pressure in Tomcat, ...


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Yes, the big question is what do you want to do with these excel documents once they're in the DB. You can store them as BLOBS quite happily, but then you can store them as files on the filesystem too, and the latter allows you to manipulate the documents in various ways (eg running code to change them). If you're just storing them for later retrieval, ...


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The challenge is how should this information be stored efficiently in an RDBMS? The question should be why should this information be stored in a RDBMS at all? What are you going to do with it once it's there? If all you're going to do is "save" a spreadsheet into the database and then pull it back out again, then I'd suggest you're wasting your ...


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Generally speaking, it is not good to duplicate values unless there is a valid reason. For the above solution, it is definitely not a good idea. Though it might seem counter-intuitive, ORMs by default (Hibernate) prefer to load and save all the fields of an entity (recommended upto a limit ~50 columns). The main reason is that they can pre-build these SQLs ...


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"Hardware is Cheap, Programmers are Expensive" The cost between a low end computer and a high end computer is generally a few hundred dollars. That investment will be amortized over a few years. If you save 10% on compilation time or the IDE responds more quickly when opening or code completion in the IDE works faster by investing in the higher performing ...


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Today is better to use cloud solutions like IBM Bluemix - http://www.ibm.com/cloud-computing/bluemix/ or https://appery.io/ etc. You do not need knowledge such as hardware and software configuration of servers, etc.


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I think in order to answer this question, you need to ask yourself another more important question... Why are you originally supporting two different builds? Most likely the answer to that would be because you have customers that have a different tempo at introducing newer major versions, which makes complete sense. So a customer is on 2.3.4 and haven't ...


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I would recommend implementing Single Sign On (SSO), for example with LDAP. Your larger customers probably would have benefited from it as well, as they would be able to replace your built in auth app with their own existing user database. For your smaller customers that don't support SSO, you can simplify deployment by shipping your app with a default auth ...


4

If you have 4 independant services, then they have to independant. No data should be shared in common DBs or similar, as then you simply make them dependant! Now while its OK to share a single DB in production, the services should use their own schemas as to DB is just there as a common container, similar to how a single Linux server can run all 4 services. ...


2

Your example is a bit abstract, but let me run through my thoughts. Option A : In my experience this is Always Bad regardless of your reasons. sure DBs like MSSQL can have friend databases etc, but if the data is linked, it should be in the same DB Option B : Not sure whats going on in here, you are adding an API which queries all DBs and brings the ...


0

It is much more common to use url parameters. For example: example.com/index.php?page=1 example.com/index.php?page=2 Then on index.php you can use $_GET['page'] to figure out which page you are retrieving, then serve that data. If you are actually generating php files on your server you can serve that page using: include 'page2.php'; Or even better: ...


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Good way to deal with this kind of issue is to have another domain/subdomain/(or even CDN service) that is dedicated to serving static files (images, scripts, stylesheets, documents, etc). So for example in simple web applications: Application path: /www/app/, Static files path: /www/static/ when user uploads a file, saving it to ...


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Angular is for Single Page Applications, forms are sent using AJAX to avoid the page to be reloaded. For sending multipart forms with AJAX, your browser need to support FormData(IE10+): http://caniuse.com/#search=FormData https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/FormData ngModel doesn't work with input[type="file"], so you have to create your own ...


0

It looks like you could integrate CheckAccess into a higher-level data-fetching function. var GetSomeData = function(req) { var data = Data.fetch(req.param_id); if (data.userId === req.user._id) { return {'error': 401}; } return {'success': data}; } // ... // in client code var reply = GetSomeData(req); if (reply.error) { ...


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I've been faced with this, and the answer is: For someone experienced in performance tuning, the new code can be tuned so almost no code can go faster. Here's an example. The reason is, there is a minimum length of time the task can take, and it's greater than one cycle. There are many, many programs that can do the task, and one or more of them take less ...


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You question is a bit of a broad/opinionated "What's the best way to manage the whole CSS thing?". It's a great question, but I don't think there is a single answer. I feel like the question is ultimately, "How do you work with Bootstrap?" Bootstrap is a front-end framework. Frameworks generally include a lot of features but, by their nature, are a ...


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What is a Non-Blocking framework? Explain it like I'm 5: Imagine you want to make a deposit to your bank account. You walk in and notice there is no queue of people waiting line. The sign over the bank teller says: "Non-blocking teller". You walk up and ask the teller to process your deposit, the teller responds: "I'm busy with another transaction, ...


0

From your statement " the DB will be locked for an uncontrollable amount of time during the external API call, potentially affecting performance" I infer that the external call could take a lot longer than the DB call. So if this is the case, then I would make the request asynchronous and send a response to the user/UI saying that the request has been ...


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and don't want to ask the individuals doing the work to manually record things like how long it takes them to perform a given task Here's the problem. You basically want to create meaningful metrics, without measuring the only thing that matters. Nearly all of your users won't care about how fast the code itself is unless it causes a noticeable impact ...


1

Maybe consider a variation of two-phase commit: Make and commit your changes to the database first, then do your API calls. If the API calls fail, then make compensatory changes to the database (basically, update the database with the previous values). This had the virtue of not locking the database for any appreciable length of time, but gives you a method ...


2

It's far easier to roll back changes made in a database that it is at the "other end" of an API call. Here's how I'd do it: Start a database transaction and make the changes there. Do the API calls. If those work, then commit the database changes; if not, roll the changes back.



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