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3

I would Check Availability on Failed Action. Just issue your calls normally and if you get a failure, then call the Service Availability function to verify. Assume service is up, if one gets and error, then issue the additional call to verify availability.


3

A resource is simply something you can get through an uniform resource identifier (URI), i.e. a piece of information which has an URI associated with it. Imagine an image funny-cat.jpg on your PC; only you can access it. This is not a resource. If, on the other hand, you install an HTTP server which points to the directory containing the image, you can now ...


3

So, I'm not sure if what I'm about to tell you is still correct but according to Mark Seeman in his book "Dependency Injection in .NET" he states that: Although the correct usage pattern concerning ADO.NET connections should be common knowledge, it's far less known that the same is true for WCF Clients. They should be closed as soon as we're finished ...


2

Let us assume there's an EVENT table and a REFEREE table, and that the first one has a PK (referee_id) which refers to REFEREE's PK (referee_id). Then one "TBC" referee (not a real person), is inserted in table REFEREE, so any event that has no referee assigned a the moment of insertion can at least be assigned the code of that imaginary referee. That ...


2

When you look at the code of the python library, you will notice that it is just a wrapper around the web API. So you are using the web API via python in either case. Unless you believe that you can write python code which uses the web API much more efficiently than the library does, there is nothing to gain from rolling your own.


2

My company use this approach (we are a Java/Maven/Jenkins shop). We use a webclient-common library in 4 or so web clients, and a webserver-common library in 3 web server projects. Just what advantage a "cut and paste" approach would add to this is a mystery to me. As with using any common code, good release management and version tagging practices are ...


2

You may want to consider a Message Queuing service like Rabbit MQ, this would allow you to send data to a server that would simply keep hold of it until you had a consumer/worker available to process it. You would have to consider things like memory usage on the message queue server if your datasets are very large (or find a way to send the data in smaller ...


1

I would put the parsing code in a factory class that knows how to create both a single instance of the Model class from the JSON as well as how to create a sequence of Model class instances from the JSON. This is based on the assumption that you already know what objects are being represented by the JSON. If you don't know exactly what objects the JSON ...


1

I'd follow the YAGNI approach for this (You Aint Gonna Need It). If you don't need a CDN right now, keep it all on your server. There's no need to carry extra expense and complication for something you don't even know you'll need for sure. Just be sure to code the site and set up the database with the notion that you may do a migration someday in the ...


1

It happens to be that service is your resource and for some reason it may not be available. What would you do if your client application talks directly to the database. Would you check availability of the database before trying to query it? I would not. I think service not being available is an exceptional circumstance. I would expect my service to be ...


1

Just because a http-ping at time t gets a response, you've still got a large uncertainty that a request at time t' will complete. I suggest you not ping the server if it can be avoided because it is a poor proxy measure of actual availability in the future. If a request is made and no response is received, retry with an exponential back-off interval.


1

If I may rephrase your question, you are asking "what happens to my system if something breaks?" Well, the short answer is that your system no longer functions properly. This happens all the time in complex systems. The degree to which you experience degraded functionality will depend upon what broke and how important it is. For example, when the space ...


1

It's perfectly valid, and is usually done in situations like the one you have. Others have suggested message queues, which are nice but they'll either take up memory or wind up writing the data to a backing store anyway, so now you've got another layer of software doing what you could do directly. That said, it may be easier and cleaner to use a message ...



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