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Having a separate business tier needs justification as it involves lots more work and costs more in performance (see: MS-Business Layer). According to one definition of Web Services, a Web Service is not generally required unless you are communicating between different physical tiers. Accordingly, a DLL may fit best for what you describe. It is common to use ...


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If your entire stack is .net there is not much value to creating web services. Just reference the DLLs in the .net components that need them, it will be faster as there is no serialization or extra network hop involved. However, for cross platform purposes, web services are the way to go. Then you can have a .net client (ASP MVC app), java client, native ...


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Yes, it can be made to work in practice. However, it may not be the best approach and is perhaps used as the default option more than it should. In my opinion, SOA became popular as a way of integrating legacy systems as organisations evolved their IT to automate ever larger tasks. It can be very messy but possibly worth it if legacy systems can be re-used. ...


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Like many important ideas, the concept is more important than the implementation detail. You could write a web-service that simply used HTML. This wouldn't be a great idea — using a JSON parser on { customerList: [{ id: 4, name: "John Doe", ... }, ... ] } will get you off the ground a lot faster than using an HTML parser on ...


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You shouldn't store a user's login credentials to a third-party service. Instead, reddit provides an oAuth API to acquire access to parts of the website that require user authentication. See: https://www.reddit.com/dev/api/oauth.



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