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I also work for an insurance company (P&C, not Life). I'm quite familiar with the nastiness that is ACORD XML. Talk about something designed by committee, huh? It's simultaneously verbose (lots of nodes) and vague (limited guidance on which nodes to use for what)... hard to believe. My suggestion would be to build something like a facade pattern out ...


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Long story short: all in one. If you consider one of these as "master" and the other as an augmented replica, that updates are replicated one way only, and you can survive large latencies in synchronisation (and I'll let you define "large") then two separate DBs will work. For anything else I'd suggest a single DB. If you have two-way updates will they be ...


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Something to consider might be a Master Data Management (MDM) approach. It would basically consist of an operational data store for each application, each using an ETL job or replication to synchronize with a master data store. Each operational data store schema can evolve independently, with the ETL job handling any necessary translations. How often ...


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I used to work on a similar application, but the anticipated situation in my application would be very different from the way this site, facebook, twitter, or your application would work. This is just in case, this can somewhat give you some insight. I put both authentication data and business data in the same SQL database. The reasons are: When the ...


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I understand you are trying to solve two key problems here Syncing configuration files to between two locations Deploying applications from development to production. To answer your first question: There a number of sync tools that are available you can use to sync a bunch of directories to across multiple systems my favorite is rsync. ...


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Logically, it doesn't matter where the service comes from. Conceptually you can think of the web pages being served as simply another service. What does matter is that the service is built in such a way that it can be used independently of other services. In other words, it wouldn't make much sense to have a public API that only works if you must also ...


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404 indicates a resource is not found. A more appropriate response code would be a 409 with a body containing more details if the nature of the conflict.


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404 means resource not found. Using it here would be not appropriate. Because the resource clearly exists, but cannot be manipulated. According to Quick Tips (http://www.restapitutorial.com/lessons/restquicktips.html) 409 Conflict would be a good way to go. You can of course return 200 with error message in the body. The client is still responsible for ...


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Before I answer your question, a couple of points about your example: REST is based on resources, so the ID for e.g. a User resource would usually be part of the resource path (rather than a URL query parameter): GET /user/1 Inserting is adding an entity to a resource collection, so to insert into e.g. a User collection you'd usually use something like: ...



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