Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Having a separate business tier needs justification as it involves lots more work and costs more in performance (see: MS-Business Layer). According to one definition of Web Services, a Web Service is not generally required unless you are communicating between different physical tiers. Accordingly, a DLL may fit best for what you describe. It is common to use ...


2

If your entire stack is .net there is not much value to creating web services. Just reference the DLLs in the .net components that need them, it will be faster as there is no serialization or extra network hop involved. However, for cross platform purposes, web services are the way to go. Then you can have a .net client (ASP MVC app), java client, native ...


1

You shouldn't store a user's login credentials to a third-party service. Instead, reddit provides an oAuth API to acquire access to parts of the website that require user authentication. See: https://www.reddit.com/dev/api/oauth.


2

Yes, it can be made to work in practice. However, it may not be the best approach and is perhaps used as the default option more than it should. In my opinion, SOA became popular as a way of integrating legacy systems as organisations evolved their IT to automate ever larger tasks. It can be very messy but possibly worth it if legacy systems can be re-used. ...


0

I am not a specialist but here are my two cents. I assume that your webservice runs on a Java EE application server. all the writes to the DB should come from your application server so you should be able to generate events in your code every time you write to the DB instead of webservice which are best for queries from the client, you could use either ...


0

Mocks are acceptable in this case, but you don't need it. Instead of unit testing method(), instead unit test just the portion that handles the response. Extract a function that takes ResponseData (of whatever kind is appropriate) and then performs the action. Instead of mocking, now you just construct a ResponseData object and pass it in. You can leave ...


0

What I've done, and it works: Have all code call webservices through proxy. The proxy calls a class that statically knows if we are using proxy or not and redirects accordingly. Mocks are just HashMaps that for each request returns a given reply. Run the tests several times in this order: 3.1 First all webservices are tested. From each machine, even ...


1

Like many important ideas, the concept is more important than the implementation detail. You could write a web-service that simply used HTML. This wouldn't be a great idea — using a JSON parser on { customerList: [{ id: 4, name: "John Doe", ... }, ... ] } will get you off the ground a lot faster than using an HTML parser on ...


0

Buzzwords come from good marketers and clever analysts. Large software vendor X has a tool it has spent X on building. An analyst (eg Gartner boy xyz) can make a big name if he coins a terms the sits. Or is first to write up and analyse an emerging trend. Sheer ignorance. If A topic that is poorly understood but used by many also tends to have a hype ...


1

XML and JSON are more flexible than HTML, because they're designed specifically to handle data in an agnostic way. Yes, you can parse HTML and do something with it, but it's not really designed for that; it's designed for displaying UI. XML and JSON, on the other hand, can be consumed by a frontend like Angular, and used to display data in an HTML page. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included