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It mostly depends on the size of the data you return and whether the user is expected to use all the data at once. For instance, if it's a list containing hundreds of thousands of complex entries: The response served as a single JSON will be rather large, and: It is unlikely that the user will actually need to see all the data at once. Instead, the user ...


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When a browser makes an HTTP request, it looks like this: GET /search?q=cats HTTP/1.0 Host: www.google.com Connection: close … to which the server should send a response that looks like this: HTTP/1.0 200 Success Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8 Content-Length: 1337 <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head><title>cats - Google ...


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A web server is a program written in any programming language that handles "web traffic" over socket(s) adhering to standards/application level protocols (HTTP, etc). Most programming languages offer you to create a socket. Am I right in thinking that a server just needs some kind of interface such as CGI to make the server and the programming language ...


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Am I right in thinking that a server just needs some kind of interface such as CGI to make the server and the programming language work together? Almost. You need a web server that has some kind of software to allow it to respond to HTTP requests as well. Think about how a static page is served. The server retrieves the HTTP request, finds the ...


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In the early days of the web, CGI was indeed the only (practical) way to have dynamic content (you could do named pipes of files -- and those were used in days before cgi, but that wasn't practical at all). CGI works by sticking a bunch of information in the environment of the process that is forked and then exec'ed (and possibly some in stdin) and then ...


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Yes, any general programming language can serve to write the server-side part of a web site. However, the qualities of a programming language, in this subject as in other things, are usually only one of many factors that contribute to its popularity. For example, I reckon that PHP became popular for websites because: It is extremely easy to upgrade from ...


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You can use some HTTP server library, e.g. libonion, even in your program coded in C (or C++, see also Wt). There also some HTTP client library (e.g. libcurl) You can use other HTTP libraries, e.g. ocsigen & ocamlnet for OCaml. There are several Web dedicated languages (outside of PHP), e.g. Opa, HOP, Kaya, etc... (both HOP & Opa can easily mix ...


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I couldn't convince my boss yet that this is a bad idea, am i wrong here? I feel like a web app is not the right tool for this job. And if this is indeed a bad idea, what would the best way be for me to clearly explain him that? I am really not sure this is a bad idea. To me it sounds like a good idea because your customers will get what they want ...


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It seems to be due to a fundamental disagreement between Alan Kay versus the people (primarily Tim Berners-Lee) who designed the web, about how such a system should work. The ideal browser, according to Kay, should really be a mini operating system with only one task: To safely execute code downloaded from the internet. In Kays design, the web does not ...



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