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37

Computers are not physical monolithical entities anymore, use virtual machines ! Your developers should be able to access different work environments as they need, and virtual machines are the perfect way to do so, you can : keep a legacy environnement easily accessible. have multiple, independent environments (ex: 1 environment per client) have test ...


31

I believe that every senior programmer / architect should watch Herb Sutter's presentation at C++ and Beyond 2011. Basically, he claims that .NET and Java indeed offer better productivity. However productivity is not all. Battery power and performance are becoming more important for hand-held devices. For big-data server-farms, if you can squeeze your ...


26

In Brief... WinRT (Windows Runtime, unlikely to be what you meant) is a software layer on top of which Metro apps are built, while Windows 8 is the whole operating system; Windows RT (most likely the one you meant), this is a version of Windows 8 for devices using processors based on the ARM achitecture and instruction set. You got the names a bit mixed ...


20

Several reasons why this is probably not the end of .NET: If you look at the video, all they actually say is that Windows 8 will support some kind of desktop widget-style application type that can be developed in HTML5. Essentially, Microsoft is turning the Windows desktop into a web browser. So this has, at far as we know now, no bearing on anything else ...


16

I agree that C++ needs a lot of improvements, mainly, because it was updated in Neolithic Age (99). C++ was never updated in 99. The first C++ Standard was 98. And then another one in 2003. And a new one has just come out this year. That's not exactly neolithic. More importantly, it's worth noticing that programming techniques that C++ had since well ...


16

Windows 8 isn't even commercially available yet. If you upgrade now, it might be to a beta of questionable stability with features that may or may not make the final cut. If you can afford it: set up an isolated test developer machine and upgrade that one. Then let all the developers play with it now and then to get used to it and find all the little ...


16

Microsoft used to simply make a C++ system that let you access their Windows API (called win32), then one day they invented .NET and figured everything had to change. So they created "Managed Extensions for C++" which was basically C++ but with a load of non-standard extensions, adding keywords like __gc to support .NET features (like allocating on the GC ...


13

view product information and create orders Sounds like stuff well within the capability of HTML 5 (and the related technologies usually mentioned in the same breath). Write a rich Web application, and you immediately support any device with a browser.


12

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the MS-Stack You can still run VB6 apps on windows 8. Retro-compatibility for good or bad has always been a trend in the MS ecosystem. You shouldn't worry about the survival of technologies like WPF / Silveright, and even winforms for that matter. On the other hand, you have to accept that for a long term project, ...


12

From what I've seen, WinRT is actually an "unmanaged" software layer based on native COM objects, so I would NOT expect to see a big performance impact when invoking the APIs. In fact, it's quite likely that these will perform better than .NET apps on the CLR, as they are likely to be "closer to the metal" than pure .NET apps. Note also that you can ...


12

The problem here isn't the async/await keywords but the fact that many WinRT APIs are only offered in an async form. In the past, APIs have been offered in a blocking form, or your choice of blocking and non-blocking, and developers were supposed to make sure the UI didn't hang. Well guess what? Developers didn't bother. I've waited multiple minutes for a ...


10

JQuery Mobile + Phone Gap Build. This is basically saying "use HTML5 and JavaScript to build your app", as has been said before, but with an important twist. Nitobi's Phone Gap Build service (now owned by Adobe) allows developers to convert HTML5/JavaScript apps to "native" apps (really hybrid apps) that can be deployed locally to a device. It's my ...


8

Citing http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2012/08/29/cxxcxpart00anintroduction.aspx: . . . while C++/CX is syntactically similar to C++/CLI and thus looks almost the same in many ways, it is semantically quite different. C++/CX code is native code, no CLR required. Programming in C++/CLI can be very challenging, as one must deftly juggle two ...


8

You're probably holding it wrong (just some context for the statement). Unfortunately I haven't had a chance to play with Win8 yet, but based on code examples I've seen, your code should look more like Constructor() { // Damm it! Another async function? I don't need aysnc! var result = await ...


6

C++ is starting to see some more importance on server side applications. Efficiently using the processor saves millions in server costs. If your app runs 7 times slower then you need to buy 7 times the servers, 7 times the cooling costs, 7 times the floor space, etc. Facebook started using some C++ for this reason. Google uses many languages, but their core ...


6

The Metro App Dev Center looks like a good place to start, with links to the developer preview, BUILD conference videos, and tutorials/articles. Honestly, I cannot vouch for the quality of the tutorials, as I have installed the Win 8 preview and watched some of the BUILD videos, but just don't have time to go farther than that with my current work schedule. ...


6

It looks like Metro apps will be able acccess enterprise data via web/WCF (Windows Communication Foundation) services (at a minimum.). It looks like you can also use local databases like sqllite, as discussed in the stackexchange thread: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7746044/using-sqlite-with-winrt


6

Windows RT vs. WinRT vs. Windows 8!! One of the things that I was confused about in the last few hours, and I am confident that many more people are going to be confused about in next few months is the difference between “Windows RT” and WinRT. Here is the simple version: Windows RT: It’s an OS. It’s a variation of the Windows 8 OS that Microsoft has ...


5

Learning WPF is a good start. Microsoft is pushing it as "Windows Forms of the Future". It has a pretty steep curve to start, but if you came from the WinForms world you will learn to love it. My recommendation is that you start with WPF, then jump into implementing the MVVM pattern. If you plan to learn Silverlight at some point, get WPF down first and ...


5

Is your team specifically developing windows desktop UI applications? If yes, I think you would want at least some of your team to move to Windows 8 as the UI might look different and what not. If you are developing other types of applications and it doesn't matter as much which version of Windows you are working on, why not just let developers make the ...


5

Was it this video? Somewhere halfway through it, he switches to a traditional desktop. New GUI doesn't seem to be more than another layer over it. .NET is much more than GUI. The new direction might spell trouble for silverlight, but for .NET it will be just another kind of presentation layer, not much different from webapps working on ASP.NET now.


5

One of .Nets not so hidden gems is WCF Data Services, which in a nutshell allows you to query a Data Model over HTTP, in a very seemless LINQ type way using a protocol called odata. Data services are usually create with Entity Framework, but I believe there are other providers too. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc668792.aspx


5

There is nothing in the certification process (so far) that prevents this scenario. As long as your application will run without crashing and doesn't violate any of the technical specifications of the platform (e.g. calling unexposed APIs), you'll pass.


5

Yes. You can advertise in Windows Store, but you need to handle payment, deployment and installation yourself.


4

As I understand it WinRT is a new framework sitting on top of the Windows Kernel. Most functionality of .Net should be available in WinRT as well although namespaces and implementations may differ. What happens to WPF or Silverlight is anyones best guess, they didn't get much mention on Build yet. I suppose Silverlight will see a final version 5 and .Net ...


4

Check out my extensive answer on Stack Overflow. There are plenty of relevant sources available indicating their 'elevator pitch', and new information is made available at a regular interval on the BUILD blog. The article which will probably interest you the most talks about 'Designing for Metro style and the desktop'. If you have time to watch it, I got ...


4

It's also C++ is portable. You can write a C++ app in windows move it to Mac/Linux/Android/iOS albeit with some fiddling. Although this probably isn't an angle MS is interested in. When windows was the only game in town then C# was safe to use. There are other alternatives Java/Python etc. They all come with a run time and so take some time to port to the ...


4

Of course it is a marketing slogan, but it shows that Microsoft is (again) committed to support native code as a first class citizen on the new platform. Whether it is of any interest to you personally, that is another question - if you prefer some other language and it does the job for you, feel free to ignore the "C++ Renaissance".



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