New answers tagged

3

Yes. The Windows NT kernel API (which is traditionally accessed by using the functions defined in ntdll.dll) can be accessed directly by use of the int 2e instruction. However this is not a supported way of using the system, and details of the implementation (including function codes) are likely to change between Windows versions. The basic approach is: ...


1

Have a look at Activator.CreateInstance. It will allow you to instantiate arbitrary classes at runtime based on a string representing the name of the assembly and class you want to instantiate. You can then plug in any class that conforms to the Interface you've specified, and configure it using an XML file accessible to your consumers. You should also ...


3

There are two aspects to that question: why would one want to develop a filesystem interface to data, and the other, why would one want to do that in userspace? Let's answer the second one first, because it's the obvious one: because it is waaaaayyyyy easier. In fact, the question should be asked the other way around: why would one want to implement a ...


1

At a glance, it appears to be similar to FUSE, which is used for the development of dozens of filesystems and filesystem-like tools. Essentially, anything that makes sense in the form of files and directories can be exposed as a filesystem, and mounted through FUSE or WinFsp as if it were a physical disk, all with the added benefits of running as a user ...


4

More specifically, why would anyone want to build a User Space file system? Easier semantics. No obscure system calls. Better isolation. A User Space file system crash doesn't bring down the whole OS. Easier to update than the kernel. Support for several programming languages. You're not re-implementing NTFS. What you're actually doing is adding ...


1

The Windows system for determining whether or not an application is allowed to take focus is somewhat arcane (due to basically consisting of a bunch of heuristics for determining whether the user is likely to want an application to take focus) and mostly undocumented (as the windows ui designers like to maintain the flexibility to tweak stuff like this with ...


0

We were able to build OpenSSL for WCE7, same libraries that Linux uses for its application level security. Then we built that into our app. So for your question, we think security wise, it was about the same as Linux. For us, what also helped were tools for debugging, detecting priority inversion problems, and monitoring CPU and memory usage. We found one ...



Top 50 recent answers are included