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Have you thought about breaking up your config file into several files? Look into configsource, which allows you to refer to a separate file for a section in your config. <pages configSource="pages.config"/> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.configuration.sectioninformation.configsource%28v=vs.110%29.aspx You can use that to put ...


0

In our applications, we only use the app.config to point to the related servers (web, db, license). Any other kind of configuration data is either stored as a local user config file (assumed it is configuration data only important for look-and-feel of the application of the local machine, thus dispensable) or stored in the database (if it is more ...


1

I think part of the issues you're facing is in the premise: Upgrading an application with a modified app.config is hard. Either it overwrites the existing configuration file or the upgraded app.config isn't installed at all. Don't do that, basically. Configuration is a software artefact, and it should be versioned and go through the same lifecycle ...


2

I read a blog post on this a while ago: http://www.patrick-wied.at/blog/image-protection-on-the-web His approach is to use interlacing images instead of single, still-standing images. You'd split up the image into several fractions, for example in the form of stripes, and display them alternating very fast. That way, if you try to cap the screen, you will ...


4

Windows NT was specifically designed to support multiple OS "personalities". In fact, it originally wasn't even intended to be a drop-in replacement for Windows and DOS, it was intended as a drop-in replacement for OS/2! On Windows NT, applications aren't written against the NT kernel, instead they are written against an OS personality, which in turn sits ...


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The thing is, MACs and PCs are fundamentally different hardware, in terms of CPU architecture. Compilers, for that matter, are nothing more than translation tools that rewrite your code from an abstract high-level programming language to low-level "words" (actual groups of bits) that the processor is reading and executing inside its logical hardware ...


0

My 2ยข: Pick any EOL encoding you want, but make sure it plays well with your build system, compilers, interpreters, etc. Make sure that this is cleanly explained in your wiki page, readme files, etc, intended for contributors. On the same page explain how to git config core.eol properly, so that contributors have an easy time sending pull requests. ...


0

For interpreted languages: use one that is supported by an "execution platform" (e.g. an application server) OS. That's because you should probably use the same OS for development in a first place. Also you may find yourself in a situation when you need to read or change (not a good idea, but possibility) deployed sources. For compiled languages: I see no ...


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I would vote for CRLF: Windows is still the most widely used OS for personal computing, therefore all other OSs have ways to deal with DOS line endings The opposite is not necessarily true, not all Windows apps can deal with Unix or Mac line endings CRLF is also the line ending for all Internet Standards and RFCs, e.g. HTTP, MIME, Usenet, Internet Mail, ...



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