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1

As for why 0x0C seems more common than 0x08 (is it really? I don't know; and in what kinds of applications?), this might have to do with virtual method table pointers. This is really more of a comment (wild mass guessing :), but it's somewhat larger, so here goes... If you've got a class with virtual methods, its own fields are going to be shifted by 0x04. ...


10

In Windows it is illegal to dereference the entire first and last page, in other words the first or last 64 KiB of the process memory (the ranges 0x00000000 to 0x0000ffff and 0xffff0000 to 0xffffffff in a 32-bit application). This is to trap the undefined behavior of dereferencing a null pointer or index into a null array. And the page size is 64 KiB so ...


54

00000000 is a special address (the null pointer). 0000000C is just what you get when you add an offset of 12 to the null pointer, most likely because someone tried to get the z member of a structure like the one below through a pointer that was actually null. struct Foo { int w, x, y; // or anything else that takes 12 bytes including padding // such ...


4

Using Win API, you can support long paths in your application: [PathTooLongException]: The specified path, file name, or both are too long. The fully qualified file name must be less than 260 characters, and the directory name must be less than 248 characters. For more information about using long paths in .NET applications, see this blog series: ...


6

When using .NET (particularly recent versions of .NET), a good guideline is to always use the built-in .NET functionality until and unless there is a marked benefit to doing otherwise. In other words: assume .NET is the right way to get the job done until you strongly suspect (or know) that it isn't. Nine times out of ten, the Framework (having been used so ...



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