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27

In Brief... WinRT (Windows Runtime, unlikely to be what you meant) is a software layer on top of which Metro apps are built, while Windows 8 is the whole operating system; Windows RT (most likely the one you meant), this is a version of Windows 8 for devices using processors based on the ARM achitecture and instruction set. You got the names a bit mixed ...


16

Microsoft used to simply make a C++ system that let you access their Windows API (called win32), then one day they invented .NET and figured everything had to change. So they created "Managed Extensions for C++" which was basically C++ but with a load of non-standard extensions, adding keywords like __gc to support .NET features (like allocating on the GC ...


12

From what I've seen, WinRT is actually an "unmanaged" software layer based on native COM objects, so I would NOT expect to see a big performance impact when invoking the APIs. In fact, it's quite likely that these will perform better than .NET apps on the CLR, as they are likely to be "closer to the metal" than pure .NET apps. Note also that you can ...


8

Citing http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2012/08/29/cxxcxpart00anintroduction.aspx: . . . while C++/CX is syntactically similar to C++/CLI and thus looks almost the same in many ways, it is semantically quite different. C++/CX code is native code, no CLR required. Programming in C++/CLI can be very challenging, as one must deftly juggle two ...


8

IMHO (old programmer; work at Microsoft but this is a personal opinion): before I can answer this question, you have to anwser this other question: Where is the code moving to? If you're sticking with a single platform (in this case, WinRT), then be close to the platform -- and that means using the existing abstractions. Per your example, your code would ...


7

The short answer is yes, at least sort of. The longer answer is that the last MS operating system a significant number of programmers understood very well was MS-DOS 6.x. Windows 3.x was fairly understandable as long as you looked at it as a number of pieces (MS-DOS, DOS extender, Windows kernel, Windows UI) but most people didn't really bother. For better ...


6

Windows RT vs. WinRT vs. Windows 8!! One of the things that I was confused about in the last few hours, and I am confident that many more people are going to be confused about in next few months is the difference between “Windows RT” and WinRT. Here is the simple version: Windows RT: It’s an OS. It’s a variation of the Windows 8 OS that Microsoft has ...


4

No. Windows RT and Windows Phone are different ecosystems and different APIs. WinRT is application runtime for running "Modern UI" apps in Windows 8 and Windows RT. It is actually only way to create a 3rd party application for Windows RT. Those apps must always be run from withing "Modern UI" of Windows, eg. it is not possible to use it from desktop ...


4

I think the answer to your question relies on the purpose, size and specifications of your app. One "hidden" specification that you have (if I didn't get it wrong) is that you want to reuse as much as possible from your WinForm project or have more or less the same structure as the other WinForm apps. In the comments you said that you are currently ...


3

So I'm reading up about the differences between the old and the new APIs, and I can't find whether the new WinRT API will provide for desktop apps, so far it seems its only available to write Metro apps - ie the full screen, 'phone style' apps. All WinRT more or less is a modified library similar to Win32. WinRT is the Metro version of Win32, ...


3

I will quote here Steve Rowe's answer from SO: Most WinRT APIs are only usable inside Metro style apps. ASP.Net or any server programming for that matter, is done in the context of a desktop application. Thus a large amount of WinRT is not usable there. If you look at the WinRT reference, you will see that most of what is present is aimed at ...


3

Currently, as in 'it's just a developer preview after all'1, you mostly have to change a couple of namespaces for your XAML/C# based solutions to compile and run as a 'legacy' app. That's because they have split some essential DLLs/namespaces from the core .NET framework that you're certain to be using right now. Then, if you want your app to be ...


2

While this article on MSDN doesn't go much into detail as to the "why", it rather explicitly states the "what." In Windows Store apps, you use .resw files to create resources. Despite the difference of file extension, the .resw file format is identical to the .resx file format, except that .resw files may contain only strings and file paths. While ...


2

Its partly what you say - it is a native API that (no doubt) does wrap much of the existing code, and that code will be part win32, part COM. As Microsoft has explicitly said its native, then it won't be wrapping any .NET code, unless that was wrapped native code anyway. You can access it using a standard C++ system: its called WRL and is like the old ATL ...


2

I think you can be safe in 2012 saying that "broadband internet is required to fully use this product" --- many other things people love and use require it. I would probably undergo creating the default data for demo / testing / refence purposes. The fact that it shows well when a user first opens the app is nice. As @bytebuster points out, you should ...


1

This decision to support Flash in the touch version of IE10 really had more to do with continuing to allow legacy Flash sites to run during the majority of the Web's transition to HTML5. WinRT API and HTML5/CSS3/JS do contain all of the core capabilities like rich, hardware accelerated animations, audio, and video, and is the superior platform to use, but ...


1

Yes it would be safe to assume that most of the people will have internet 90% of the time. But for a better user experience you should consider designing you app in such a way that it is still usable even if there is not internet connection. However it totally depend on the nature of the application and since you have not mentioned details about your app, ...


1

Direct2D and Direct3D11 now play nice. That's it as far as I know.


1

Microsoft is saying that you can, but that there's no documentation on it yet: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winappswithnativecode/thread/e65f53b4-cac9-44e3-aa10-cd7955d6a9b3 We have received a number of inquiries in this area. The documentation will be expanding as the Windows 8 project progresses to include more API specific details. ...



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