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1

Some (much?) data, such as the book example, isn't inherently hierarchical. That the bookstore example uses hierarchical storage is a consequence of XML's tree structure, not the inherent structure of the data. Consider that a book can have many authors, and an author can write many books, which means neither can strictly belong to the other. XML gets around ...


1

Hierarchical databases used to be very popular, but they went out of fashion in the 80s because they are not very good at supporting ad hoc querying, and setting them up could be difficult, I believe. The best known standard for hierarchical databases was the CODASYL data model (see http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/CODASYL for details of this), which was ...


1

If you choose to maintain a hierarchy in a relational database, you need to look into the Nested Set design pattern. (See Wikipedia) This model involves some programming, and it involves some overhead at insert or update time. The benefit comes at retrieval time. Retrieving the path or the subtree for any given node is easy and fast, when compared to the ...


1

Most modern database management systems allow for storing XML data in a column. Using different techniques based on the DBMS, you can query values contained in the XML column. SQL server and Oracle both support XML column types. I am fairly certain that mysql does as well, but can't confirm that at the moment.


2

Declarative Languages Declarative programming is often defined as any style of programming that is not imperative. A number of other common definitions exist that attempt to give the term a definition other than simply contrasting it with imperative programming. For example: A program that describes what computation should be performed and ...


3

Despite having the word language in them, I would not consider them programming languages, but rather data formats. I know that XML has been used as the format for some DSLs, probably likewise for YML. A language does not have to be Turing complete to be a programming language, but it does need to be active -- without exceeding the standard definition, ...


9

XML = "eXstensible Markup Language" YAML = "YAML Ain't Markup Language" (Though it was originally "Yet Another Markup Language".) Though in truth people think of them more like data formats (which JSON is) rather than languages partly because people assume "Language" == "Turing Complete".


2

Etymologically, a "node" is a "knot": think of a fisherman's net as "holes tied together with string", and then nodes are where the string is knotted. The term comes from graph theory in mathematics. If you think of a graph as a collection of points connected to each other by lines ("arcs"), then the points are called nodes. A tree is a special case of a ...


1

You can safely compare it to a map of a subway system, e.g. the London Underground: (http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mappa_della_metropolitana_di_Londra) A node is a stop, an edge is the connection between stations. That's about it with general graphs. However, there are special graphs with more, interesting properties, like Trees: ...


2

In the context of an SGML language where DOM is typically used (i.e. HTML, XML), a node is the smallest piece of text that has semantic meaning. Nodes are arranged in a tree structure, with the document as the root node. Each node can have zero or more children. There are several types of nodes: Document: this is the root node of the whole document. It ...


-1

The Node object represents a single node in the document tree. A node can be an element node, an attribute node, a text node, or any other of the node types explained in the Node Types chapter.


3

ASCII is a subset of UTF-8. You can read any ASCII-encoded document as UTF-8, and it will work. ASCII only uses 7 bits, and UTF-8 uses the unused eight bit to mark non-ASCII code units. The XML standard requires the XML declaration <?xml … to be present. If it is absent, you are not dealing with a well-formed XML document and should probably reject it. ...


5

US-ASCII is a 7-bit code, and it's a true subset of UTF-8. In other words, every ASCII file is by definition also an UTF-8 file. The file command classifies it as 'ASCII' because there are no 8-bit characters in it, and it's totally right in doing that. Nevertheless you should always read XML files assuming that they're UTF8-encoded. It doesn't hurt even if ...


0

Have you thought about breaking up your config file into several files? Look into configsource, which allows you to refer to a separate file for a section in your config. <pages configSource="pages.config"/> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.configuration.sectioninformation.configsource%28v=vs.110%29.aspx You can use that to put ...


0

In our applications, we only use the app.config to point to the related servers (web, db, license). Any other kind of configuration data is either stored as a local user config file (assumed it is configuration data only important for look-and-feel of the application of the local machine, thus dispensable) or stored in the database (if it is more ...


1

I think part of the issues you're facing is in the premise: Upgrading an application with a modified app.config is hard. Either it overwrites the existing configuration file or the upgraded app.config isn't installed at all. Don't do that, basically. Configuration is a software artefact, and it should be versioned and go through the same lifecycle ...



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