1,054 reputation
1618
bio website facebook.com/felix.dombek
location Berlin, Germany
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Sep 16 at 14:27

Student of Computational Linguistics B.Sc. at the University of Potsdam, Germany

Programmer at a small backup software company (Visual C++, Python, some VB6 and PHP)


May
9
asked Working machines of developers - in what ways are they usually standardized or restricted?
May
7
revised Worst practices in C++, common mistakes
added 1 characters in body
May
5
revised Worst practices in C++, common mistakes
deleted 15 characters in body; edited title
Feb
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Dec
8
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
15
comment Is there a language or design pattern that allows the *removal* of object behavior or properties in a class hierarchy?
One could of course just throw a NotSupportedException from Penguin.fly().
Nov
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
21
answered Should I reuse variables?
Oct
20
comment Why c++? Where to start?
Why –1? I was looking forward to an answer evaluating the usefulness of Python for desktop programming; is this a bad answer?
Oct
20
comment Why is Scheme my first language in university?
@SK-logic: So you name one thing where the recursion is hard to eliminate. Big deal. I don't doubt that there are more use cases. In fact, I never learned Lisp, but from my experience with Prolog (which also employs recursion almost exclusively), you don't use the same approach in C++. People don't process linked lists recursively even if that seems logical. People don't do wildcard matching recursively even though you might find it more readable and easier to implement. And so on. De-recursivizing recursive algorithms makes constant memory usage possible, that's why it's important.
Oct
20
comment Why is Scheme my first language in university?
@SK-logic: I wrote that with respect to the "Lisp dialects follow the mathematical paradigm of algorithms more closely" answer. This sentence is correct, and what I wrote about C++ basically follows from this. Maybe not all mathematical ideas are discouraged in C++, but there are, for instance, some good reasons to use iteration instead of recursion. C++ makes it entirely possible to write a program in the same manner as you would write a basic Lisp program; in practice, this is hardly a good idea.
Oct
20
answered Why is C++ often the first language taught in college?
Oct
20
comment Why is Scheme my first language in university?
I agree that Scheme is a great language and it's a good idea to learn it. However, let's face it; almost every real-world programming job employs an imperative language; most really serious programming jobs require C++, and C++ programmers usually actively discourage you from using all the nice mathematically-based ideas for program design for one reason or another. Recursion won't play a large role in your imperative programs.
Oct
18
answered Why has C prevailed over Pascal?
Sep
22
comment How do you learn Regular Expressions?
+1 because you address several things that are good to know when using regexes; I disagree however on your judgement that it's not necessary to know the insides. For drilling, you are totally right; in computers, I have found that sooner than I think at first, I get to the point where I have to understand something's insides to master its application – whether it's C++ (compilers), web servers (HTTP), or regexes (automata theory). Not to the point where I become an expert, but a good understanding of the underlying principles is often the quickest way to learn.
Sep
22
comment How do you learn Regular Expressions?
The mentioned "regex processor" actually doesn't implement disjunctions, and with the given approach, it's very hard to add them. I like the book, but this is one thing I was disappointed with.
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
+1 ... and I LOL'd hard on "they introduce std::cout just before return (page 3)" gotta peek into that one :)
Sep
12
comment How to teach a script to detect sarcasm?
Here are two current scientific papers about developments in sarcasm detection. This is cutting-edge stuff, not production ready and very difficult to copy, such as (unfortunately) most current developments in NLP: paper from Jerusalem Hebrew University, paper from Valencia Technical University. Both approaches use statistical inference on hand-annotated corpuses of Amazon product reviews.
Sep
12
comment How to teach a script to detect sarcasm?
@DaveNay: The statement is missing a closing bracket and would be better expressed as containsSarcasm = string.Contains("<Sarcasm>") anyway. However: if someone tackling an open problem, it's bad to ridicule of OP's request, especially given that you're not knowledgeable in this field. Computational linguistics exists since the 1950s and has yielded some interesting insights into sentiment analysis, semantic role labeling and other semantic techniques which might be employed for this.