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seen Nov 11 at 9:17

Oct
8
comment How to organise and label methods, intended for debug?
@Dunk: You found the hints, because Vorac rewrote most of the questions after my initial comments, as you can see from his comment before your first.
Sep
24
comment How to organise and label methods, intended for debug?
@Dunk I see no hints to embedded, real-time, or multi-threaded nature of the system in question. Anyways, my goal was just to know why debugging isn't feasible. I still don't really know why, but I also think it's futile to discuss this further, as logging seems to be the way he should go.
Sep
24
comment How to organise and label methods, intended for debug?
I don't understand what you do there. I can't imagine a system where you can't use a debugger. If you want to debug only part of the system, run the debugger in a test environment. Anyways, logging is the logical alternative, as mentioned below.
Sep
24
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
comment How to organise and label methods, intended for debug?
Why can't you use a debugger for debugging, which would save the need for any specialized accessors?
Sep
1
comment How to let the outside world decorate my private field?
Ok, but you need to keep the same FloodGate instance? Then you could do something like floodGate.setController(new Wrapper(floodGate.getController())) to add the wrapper. Alternatively, you create a new FloodGate and pass it the wrapped controller from the old gate.
Sep
1
answered How to let the outside world decorate my private field?
Aug
27
answered Designing Nested List<Class> Property in a Class
Aug
25
answered How would you rewrite/refactor this ?
Apr
2
comment Unit Testing a method that contains two output type parameters
@shankbond You need only one assertion that compares the actual computation result with an expected instance of IntDivideResult. This, of course, requires IntDivideResult to implement equals/hashCode, which should be tested in a IntDivideResultTest. Writing such simple tests might seem like a waste of time, but it's not much effort and in my experience it's the small things we don't consider important that cause the most trouble in the end. Your reason for not writing a test should never be that it appears to easy.
Apr
1
comment Unit Testing a method that contains two output type parameters
@shankbond I would group quotient and remainder in a IntDivideResult class. Both values are logically correlated, so there's nothing wrong with grouping them. As for performance: You should profile performance when you have a performance issue. Bottlenecks tend to arise where did not expect them at all. Micro-optimizing during development almost never helps. You can always introduce caching behind the scenes, e.g., to avoid duplicated computation, IF the calculation should become a performance problem.
Mar
31
comment Unit Testing a method that contains two output type parameters
@shankbond the question is how your three values correlate... why does your method produce all three of them? because they are part of some higher-level entity? Then capturing them in an aggregate class seems a good idea. If not, why are they computed in the same method? Split the method up into three methods, each of which returns one of the values.
Mar
9
awarded  Commentator
Mar
9
comment Self-organization during Sprint Planning
If you have disagreements because some people say they could do it faster than others, the save way is to plan conservatively. If the disagreement is to strong, however, you problably have a very unequal distribution of knowledge in the team. Then maybe you should consider pair programming of the "expert" and the "slow one".
Mar
3
answered Self-organization during Sprint Planning
Jan
29
answered Is it correct/useful to define Computational Complexity in this way?
Jan
27
comment Is it correct/useful to define Computational Complexity in this way?
To judge weather this is correct, I'd need to see the algorithm. Weather or not it is useful, depends on what you want to do. Talking about Complexity has its uses, e.g., it will tell you about scalability. So what's your goal?
Nov
26
comment Why do modern websites still insist on archaic username/password requirements?
I see your point and I agree that this could be listed as a separate point. However, I think it is a special case of not caring enough. Copying a solution from someone else without spending a thought about it implies that you don't care about the quality of the solution. You just want to have one. It's the "easy way out" all over again.
Nov
22
comment Why do modern websites still insist on archaic username/password requirements?
As was stated before, you would be surprised about how many "modern" systems heavily depend on legacy monoliths. I worked in a software(!) company only two years ago where they still used a telnet-based time-tracking software that was not even able to calculate my working time based on the start and end time I entered... the reason: it worked and it was found to critical to risk down-time during exchange!
Nov
22
answered Why do modern websites still insist on archaic username/password requirements?