597 reputation
39
bio website kjempekjekt.com
location Bergen, Norway
age 38
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Oct 28 at 14:03
I'm a .NET developer working for PSWinCom - a company in the Telecommunications business, located in Bergen, Norway.

Some links:
Linked In profile | My blog (Norwegian only) | twitter

See also my programming-related cartoon, the contiki strip.

Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Sep
10
awarded  Yearling
Apr
21
comment Function like C# properties?
I was just trying to match the syntax requested..
Apr
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
10
comment Adding dynamic business logic/business process checks to a system
All configuration systems eventually evolve into (domain specific) programming languages anyway :)
Apr
10
comment Adding dynamic business logic/business process checks to a system
I was just about to say that :)
Apr
10
answered How were some language communities (eg, Ruby and Python) able to prevent fragmentation while others (eg, Lisp or ML) were not?
Apr
8
answered Techniques for getting off the ground in any language
Apr
8
answered Junior developer support
Apr
8
awarded  Critic
Apr
7
answered Function like C# properties?
Feb
14
comment Is there a specific term for an accessor method that returns a boolean value?
FYI: In Common Lisp the name of predicate functions (should) end with the letter p - so that everyone knows exactly what it is. In languages like Ruby and Clojure the convention is to end the name with a questionmark.
Feb
14
answered Best way to handle class relationship
Jan
17
awarded  Commentator
Jan
17
comment Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
@ThePopMachine To protect your software from re-writes you should not grant users the rights to read your code. Once it's read, the knowledge is in the users brain, and you can't regulate what people are allowed to know. Theoretically I could read some code, tell another person all about what I read, and he could be able to reproduce it line by line (far fetched for larger projects, I know). This is how many clones have been legally created in our industry for years (see Triumph of The Nerds documentary).
Jan
16
comment Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
@ThePopMachine Where I would draw the line: Machine translation would mean you didn't write the code, you just compiled it. And I believe translating source between different programming languages is fundamentally different from translating a text from one human language to another. Mind you, I'm not talking about ethics here, but my interpretations of the law - of which I clearly don't know much :/
Jan
16
comment Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
I think I'm in the right to state my views on this, which I did, and I also clearly expressed that it was MY BELIEF, and that I'm no expert. I think the discussion it triggered is valuable, and your possibility to downvote my answer ensures that my view is not considered the truth by anyone. I have tried to investigate, and can find no good information on this exact subject - whether porting is considered derived work, and whether copyrights apply. The licenses I've seen does not mention anything about this either. In practice much open source code is ported without giving author rights back.
Jan
14
revised Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
Added a couple of links
Jan
14
revised Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
Added elaboration about copyright / patents / derived work
Jan
14
comment Porting library, what to do with JavaDoc comments/credits
@ThePopMachine, if you believe this isn't the legally correct answer, please vote me down. I'll try to find a credible source for my view. Basically this is what I believe to be true. Take the various XUnit frameworks for examples. Who are the authors? They are basically just ports of eachother..