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Oct
22
comment database migration with data already in the database in production
Well, sure, you'd write a script, and sure, this is done in production databases. But if you didn't collect some piece of information before you are probably going to have to write code that does not assume it will always have access to it.
Oct
16
comment Is CodeFirst intended for large scale applications?
All migrations do (and they don't have to run automatically) is describe the series of database changes you want to make in code. If there's no conflict between the old model and the new one (or you don't need database changes at all) then there is no reason why you can't have two versions using the same database.
Oct
16
comment Is CodeFirst intended for large scale applications?
Migrations are intended precisely for the scenario you describe.
Oct
7
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Oct
2
comment When does it make sense to compile my own language to C code first?
Seems like libraries are a pretty compelling reason to consider it too.
Oct
2
comment When does it make sense to compile my own language to C code first?
@delnan Well, it's not really clear from the OP which thing it's "about," but, sure, there are various reasons you might pick one or the other to be your intermediate language once you decide you want one.
Oct
2
comment When does it make sense to compile my own language to C code first?
If you look past C you'll see that C# and Java also both compile to intermediate languages. You're saved from having to redo a lot of work that someone else has already done by targeting an intermediate language instead of going straight to assembly.
Sep
26
comment How to validate a given domain is owned by the user?
FWIW, this is the approach Microsoft uses if you want a custom domain for Office 365.
Sep
18
comment When to not use dynamic in C#
Generics can be constrained on an interface. Dynamics can be quite useful in some cases, though -- reflection-heavy code immediately springs to mind.
Sep
5
comment Why are the <b> and <i> tags deprecated?
@MichaelHampton That's definitely false; the recommendations for page load times have stayed pretty consistent and I remember dire warnings, in the old days, to stay away from animated GIFs and too many images.
Sep
5
comment What's wrong with comments that explain complex code?
I don't like reductive schools like Robert Martin's for this reason. Yes, this is all well and good, except that if you have to satisfy a complex requirement sometimes complex code is required to do it.
Sep
5
comment Why are the <b> and <i> tags deprecated?
@Tsasken Yes, but b and i are not deprecated and this answer is right as far as the new definitions being totally contrived.
Sep
5
comment Why are the <b> and <i> tags deprecated?
@supercat Seems like "strong" would probably work.
Sep
4
comment BDD based on 1-liner requirements
Well, for instance, why not do rapid prototyping and then start making tests when you're relatively confident you won't want to make sweeping changes to how things work? I realize that's not fashionable but it's another way to end up where you're trying to go. I'm sure there are other approaches, but my point, ultimately, is that if you aren't getting detailed specs then a methodology that starts from the principle that everything must have detailed specs is a poor fit.
Sep
4
comment BDD based on 1-liner requirements
OK, but they are not the only way to achieve that goal and they are also large, overarching philosophies that don't sound to be compatible with the way your company does things at all. This does not sound like a project that's destined for success.
Sep
4
comment Is using Git Stash as a workflow an antipattern?
Have you run into a problem because of it? Really that's the answer to your question.
Sep
4
comment BDD based on 1-liner requirements
Why are you trying to shoehorn a totally different process in? What makes you think it will be accepted?
Aug
27
comment Addressing the fact that primary keys are not part of your business domain
Natural keys sometimes seem really compelling but it's too easy to get burned (e.g., "whoops, now I have multiple tenants and that's no longer unique").
Aug
25
comment protect purchased games to be downloaded on other pc
OK, but the cost of copy protection of any sort is pretty marginal after you implement it once (unlike a vending machine) and it doesn't have to be onerous; just something like asking for a license key probably works. I doubt that would lead to lost sales; it's not very onerous and I can't think of many people who would be fine with whipping out their credit cards but consider entering in a license key a bridge too far.
Aug
25
comment protect purchased games to be downloaded on other pc
@MasonWheeler OK, to spell it out, I contend that your bagel example is not a good one because there is absolutely nothing protecting the bagels at all. Would those same people have jimmied food out of a vending machine, or tried to trick a vending machine with a coin on a string, or something like that? I'd guess that the rate of theft would go down pretty significantly if you had to do that, and you can pretty easily see how this theory would apply to software too. Even your own article suggests the cheats in the story would be unlikely to walk out of a restaurant without paying.