Reputation
31,817
Next tag badge:
787/400 score
71/80 answers
Badges
6 74 129
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~1.2m people reached

Mar
23
comment Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals
I do not find that hard to believe at all. Most likely the failure to meet sprint goals doesn't cause acute problems because features are still being delivered fast enough for the business side to work reasonably well, maybe because the product doesn't have much competition in its niche and sales don't depend on promising new features and delivering them on time.
Mar
23
comment Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals
A "small software company with 1 product" probably doesn't have multiple levels of management, and quite possibly the existing managers don't have formal education in management.
Mar
11
comment Why are we anyway doing Software Estimation knowing it is broken?
Even from a pure development perspective, "it's finished when it's finished" can be a toxic attitude, as evidenced by Duke Nukem Forever.
Mar
11
comment Why are we anyway doing Software Estimation knowing it is broken?
@Euphoric: sales started about half a year after that presentation - and half a year is not much time at all to ramp up production and distribution at that scale.
Mar
11
comment Why are we anyway doing Software Estimation knowing it is broken?
@Euphoric: I'm not talking about deadlines, I'm talking about deciding whether a project makes sense economically and should be started at all. Yes, it's idiotic to set hard deadlines for feature-complete delivery based on estimates done before development starts, but that's not the only way you can use estimates. You use them to allocate resources, to make plans with the understanding that they might have to change, and you use updated estimates to know when and how to change the plans.
Mar
11
comment Why are we anyway doing Software Estimation knowing it is broken?
@AlexPunnen: That they weren't announced in advance publically doesn't mean there were no internal project plans based on estimates; you can be 100% certain that there were. The iPhone was presented on the Macworld conference - you really think it was a coincidence that it was ready in time for that?
Mar
11
comment Why are we anyway doing Software Estimation knowing it is broken?
@Euphoric: if you disagree with that statement, then you fail at basic logic and there is no point in further discussion.
Feb
25
comment Divide and Conquer algorithms – Why not split in more parts than two?
@jeebface oops, that was a typo (now fixed). It's 0.63 (the reduction in recursion depth), then the result of 26% more also works out.
Jan
20
comment what happens at Java interpreter level when IncompatibleClassChangeError is thrown?
Keep in mind that is bug is ancient, it was fixed in 2002. Current JVMs most likely work quite different.
Dec
28
comment What backs up the claim that C++ can be faster than a JVM or CLR with JIT?
@Lothar: you are wrong. Java JIT compilers are extremely smart and have been able to do stack allocation of objects for well over 5 years now: www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg1IZ70114
Dec
20
comment Distinction between API and frontend-backend
@johnny: no - SOA is a concept at a much higher level of abstraction, it's more about how you organize your business functionality than about technical layers.
Aug
31
comment Why does databases use text?
I don't think you understand what "serialized" means...
Jun
29
comment floating-point number stored in float variable has other value
For a somewhat easier introduction: floating-point-gui.de
Jun
20
comment How can I avoid the use of strings?
@AlexFoxGill: yeah, but in any sane GUI framwork, you should get the result of the user's choice as an object directly without having to parse a string.
Jun
7
comment Security issue about making my code public in GitHub
@Pacerier: I'll take you up on that wager anytime. Note that the statement is that open source increases security, not that it results in perfect security. You can cite examples for bugs in OSS until the cows come home and it proves absolutely nothing to the contrary. There actually is proper research: archive.wired.com/software/coolapps/news/2004/12/66022 - yes, it's over 10 years old, but until you can find something concrete with contrary findings, it stands.
May
27
comment Should I build a multi-threaded system that handles events from a game and sorts them, independently, into different threads based on priority?
@supercat: if there are sufficiently many interactions, you could end up with the "clique" being the whole world. Also, establishing globally that "everything has been resolved" could be quite nontrivial.
May
27
comment Should I build a multi-threaded system that handles events from a game and sorts them, independently, into different threads based on priority?
@supercat: I'm pretty sure that won't work. You can't easily "go back and redo" when you detect a collision because you already have proceeded with other calculations based on the new state.
May
8
comment What was the date of the Java Alpha and Beta releases
@Philipp: quite possibly both.
May
6
comment Best strategy to find the root cause when exception is swallowed by 3rd party
@YazadKhambata: the s in strace does not stand for "stack". It will not give you any information about your exception directly, but it may reveal what it was trying to do that caused the exception, e.g. access a file that doesn't exist, or open a network connection that is blocked by a firewall.
Feb
18
comment Abstraction in algorithms
@Ahmad "comparable objects" is exactly the kind of thing that should be part of an abstract description of an algorithm. There are in fact sorting algoritms (e.g. radix sort) where that is not sufficient. Abstracting things in terms of input and output is part of software engineering or (more specifically) requirements engineering.