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Jul
30
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
15
comment Complex iterators in C
The first/next structure immediately makes me think of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAR_and_CDR -- I don't know if that has a particular name, though.
Jun
1
answered How to think as a C programmer after biased with OOP language?
May
30
comment Can I use these terms “patch”, “update”, “commit” interchangeably?
Contrariwise, when I think of a "patch", I think of content written specifically in the "diff" format, and which can be applied by the "patch" program.
May
28
answered How to display/clarify the licence for code in a blog
May
26
awarded  Critic
Sep
2
awarded  Yearling
Nov
11
comment What demands should be placed on source repository / versioning tools?
@Cawas: Sorry for the confusion! When I said blame, I meant blame in the CVS sense, such as: theadmin.org/articles/subversion-blame. It's not an often-used feature, but it's an incredibly useful one to track who wrote a particular line. I'm not sure if Dropbox has that, although it definitely has pretty good revert support. I wouldn't use it to manage code changes, but it might be useful to manage changes in other project documentation? And of course it's a great way to share files!
Nov
7
comment What demands should be placed on source repository / versioning tools?
Do they really do diff, blame and revert? Definitely push and pull works well for Dropbox, but I'm not sure about the others, and the ability to see where changes come from -- especially a function like blame -- is incredibly useful for a VCS!
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
12
revised Are there any famous one-man-army programmers?
Incorporated one of the comments, which makes a pretty important point.
Sep
3
awarded  Yearling
Jul
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
28
comment Should a newcomer to Perl learn both Perl 5 and 6?
Perl 6 doesn't use regexes, it uses rules (and they're awesome!): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perl_6_rules
Apr
11
comment What differentiates the exceptional programmers from the really good ones?
Dunk, Robert: sometimes the best way to promote yourself is to write a piece of software so awesome that everybody who uses or modifies it goes, "Woah - who wrote this?!". My point is only that if you're the type who goes "Aw, shucks, it was nothing", you're probably not going to pierce the "rock star" sphere of influence - I'm not at all implying that somebody uses self-promotion instead of actual programming skills, but a symbiotic intermingling of both.
Jan
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
19
awarded  Suffrage
Sep
29
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
19
comment What differentiates the exceptional programmers from the really good ones?
Robert: Definitely. But if he'd just shared jQuery with a few friends and at work, we'd might never know about him at all. We know him as a great programmer precisely because he had the courage, not just to share jQuery with the world, but also to actively promote it as a better way to do Javascript. I'd like to see more programmers (including myself) learning how to do that effectively.
Sep
17
answered What differentiates the exceptional programmers from the really good ones?