2,065 reputation
1023
bio website stackoverflow.com
location New York, NY
age 43
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen May 24 at 14:18

StackOveflow profile

Areas of strength:

  • Perl expert (specifically enterprise software development)
  • Sybase (including design and optimization)
  • GUI design

Areas of familiarity:

  • Web programming (EmbPerl, JSP, CSS, HTML, JavaScript)
  • C++

...P.S. I'm not really 42. But 42 is way cooler than a real answer :)

...P.P.S. Don't read too much into the icon. Just a minor nod to Cryptonomicon.


Jan
21
comment Most efficient way to generate all descendents of all nodes in a tree
Sorry, -1. The whole purpose of the aglorithm is precomputing the data. Lazy computation is wholly defeating the reason for even running the algo.
Jan
20
comment Most efficient way to generate all descendents of all nodes in a tree
@Giorgio - of course. That's what I tried to imply by "via loops instead of recusion".
Jan
5
comment Is this database design good? What JPA Entities should I create for this design?
One major mistake - given college fee inflation, double is probably inadequate to work long term.
Jan
4
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@JeffO - the choice of current langages was made mostly before I joined the firm.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
If you can find actual research/evidence for these assertions to back them up - especially "Functional languages help to get rid of some of these challenges" - so far this is poised to be the best available answer.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
Another (perhaps less valid) problem with your example: I could write the first example in fully readable mostly-non-FP Perl in - I'm guessing - 30% of the volume. Maybe less. Depends on whether you accept map/grep as non-FP. IOW, you are presenting arguments that Java is a bad language, not that FP is a good approach.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
Also, unless I made a major wording mistake, the question definitely didn't mean to allude to "wholesale change" as the intended result of the arguments being sought.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
No, my goal is NOT (for the purposes of this question) to " grow as a software developer". My goal is to collect a best set of arguments to present to people who make decisions, that would sway them towards permitting FP as approved approach. Nothing more, and nothing less. Highlight benefits of FP, especially compared to standard OOP/procedural stack.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
Also, dont mistake not being a programmer and being dumb. @ Ashalynd's answer poses an argument that most of intelligent senior managers would get (especially with cites/references) even if they don't understand the nitty gritty of "why" that argument is valid. All they need to know is that we are scaling to the width, which doesn't require a CS degree and 20 years coding experience.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
I'm amazed that 19 people upvoted an answer that does not answer the question at all. It's a practical question, in a practical situation. Team members do NOT have a voice, and don't need to be convinced. They also won't be working - and neither will I for that matter - on unapproved technology/language, as the question made crystal clear.
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@RobertHarvey - yes. The question was NOT "Is FP a good thing" or "Is it possible to convince people FP is good thing". The question was very precisely "Which arguments can be used to support WHEN trying to convince it's a good thing". It was NOT "How can I stealthily introduce FP into my work/coding in a positive way" either, which is what you answered - if that was an option I wouldn't be asking in the first place, I'd be coding :)
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@RobertHarvey (1) I take that back. Now TWO of the useful answers are lowest voted :) (new one that just got posted could be improved with facts but is a good start).
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@RobertHarvey - that's a bit of a red herring argument, at least in my specific case. They are already intelligent enough to know THAT. What they do NOT know (and what I found out from this answer) is that Eaton Vance uses Scheme and more importantly, Faceboook, BoA/ML, Deutsche Bank and Google [use Haskell]. Meaning, it's something they CAN consider dipping a toe in, since other worthies decided to. Amazing that the only actually useful answer that tried to address the question I asked (and not the one people felt like answering) is the one with least votes
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@JeffO - I wish it were that easy :)
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@Back2dos good point. I definitely did not meant to imply all or nothing
Jan
2
comment What would be good factual arguments to convince high level management to consider functional programming?
@DocBrown - yup! Reading stuff via RSS reader has its downsides.
Dec
30
comment What is different between the internal design of Java and C++ that lets C++ have multiple inheritance?
@kdgregory - yes, I specifically expected a decent asnwer to delve to the level of detail that your second-to-last comment mentions. "because they could but chose not to" isn't an answer, it's handwaving. Also, "whether you understand" is - leaving aside being a bit on the rude side - fully irrelevant to how SE works. A good answer is there for 100% of present and future readers, not only the OP.
Dec
30
comment What is different between the internal design of Java and C++ that lets C++ have multiple inheritance?
Unless Java has an equivalent of vtables, I'm pretty sure this answer is wrong.
Dec
30
comment What is different between the internal design of Java and C++ that lets C++ have multiple inheritance?
@Snowman - sorry, we are still on 6 here. I'll update the question to restrict to 1-7, but feel free to post what Java 8 added that covered the gap and what wasn't available before.
Dec
30
comment What is different between the internal design of Java and C++ that lets C++ have multiple inheritance?
@Doval - unless calling a.X() in case of diamond inheritance is an undefined behavior, I would say that it solved the problem. Now, whether it solved ALL the conceptual problems of multiple inheritance as an idea, is a different story, but it's not germaine to what I'm asking.