4,016 reputation
922
bio website code.google.com/p/…
location San Diego, CA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 6 at 17:06

I'm passionate about coding and researching the history of technology as well as exploring where technology is leading.

I used to work in flight simulation doing both hardware implementation (electrical design, wiring), web development (design, development, webmaster), as well as software development (desktop development in C#).

I'm a big fan of both using and contributing to Open source projects.

I am the creator of the pypreprocessor library that can be found on PYPI as well as Google code.


Mar
25
revised Why do business analysts and project managers get higher salaries than programmers?
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Mar
25
revised Feeling of Despair before programming?
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Mar
25
revised What is the difference between a great programmer and a financially successful programmer?
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Mar
25
awarded  Organizer
Mar
25
revised Are certifications worth it?
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Mar
25
revised What is a resonable workflow for designing webapps?
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Mar
25
comment What is the biggest trouble developers encounter when debugging?
@Agos ...and your girlfriend is ovulating :)
Mar
25
comment What's a good light-weight source repository for local development?
Or you could setup your own SVN server using svnserve. It's not too hard to setup if you know how to configure port forwarding on a router (and DynDNS if you have dynamic IP) and have some time to google how to set it up. I ran one from home for about 2 years that I used for development for myself (in Denver) and another dev (in Montreal) to co-develp a project. If you have the time (and patience) though, I'd definitely suggest you learn git and setup a git server daemon.
Mar
25
comment What's a good light-weight source repository for local development?
+1!!! Git is the s***. :)
Mar
25
comment What's the “normal” range for typing speed for developers?
Bah... I type 60-65 WPM no problem. An hour on Keybr.com every few months works wonders for speed. A lifetime membership is $9USD if I remember and features a bar graph that helps track progress over time. I can't remember the last time I had to think about typing. Just assume it's my synapses that are typing this message out to you right now.
Mar
25
answered Where is the golden mean between language monoculture and polyculture?
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
Of course, I'm somewhat of a skeptic. In the bigger picture of things I see Riding the Technical Renaissance is kind of like being part of Microsoft in the late 80's. Eventually we'll hit a limit and all our current projections of the future will start to crumble. Also, I think that, evolution wise, we're like an 18 year old. We feel invincible and we're still so self absorbed about conquering nature that we don't realize our own mortality. IE, that we do have limits. Population being one of them, theoretical understanding limits being another.
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
Assume that we stop breeding like rabbits over the next 200 years and trim our population to a level that is sustainable and productive (potential decrease from current population or spike in technology being required). The current models all assume that human population will continue to grow. What if it flattens out, how much will humans be able to evolve to keep making intellectual progress at an accelerated rate? I'd assume, not a whole lot (evolution is slow).
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
Now, theres the expectation in the human models that human's understanding of the universe will continue to grow at an exponential rate but those models neglect to recognize that our understanding is growing at a rate that complements our growth in population. They also neglect to recognize that even humans have a carrying capacity. Our population isn't sustainable now and we all know what happens when populations aren't sustainable...
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
Think about it like this, people have been cooking as long as we remember. I mean the sum of humankind has been cooking for longer than human history has been recorded. Thats a lot of cooking! Now, if you consider that, after all that time/effort we've only scratched the surface of what can be done with food. If you think of cooking as programming and computer science as chemistry, in the realm of chemistry, we've only scratched the surface of mapping a few proteins. Sure we have a good idea of how things work on a molecular level but we have a long way to go.
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
I never said I wasn't interested in discussion. Or that the Op's question was dumb, or short sighted. I'm not one to pussyfoot, if that's what I thought, you'd see a comment expressing it under the question (probably in bold). I just lose interest in a discussion when it becomes an endurance match to see who can extend further into the abstract for no benefit other than to prove the other party that the opinion is not wrong. Just because I presented a simple answer doesn't make it wrong and just because an answer is infinitely complex doesn't make it right.
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
The air's getting a little thin up here. If you don't mind I'm going to head back down to earth now.
Mar
25
comment taking notes while reading source code of large projects
@rahmanisback I haven't really worked on any of the 'big' projects yet so I guess I haven't seen how bad it could be. :)
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
Humans rely on abstracts because we only have the mental capacity to understand patterns not the raw information. Think of it like a compression algorithm, if the data is patterned the data can be simplified into a shortened form. Our form of abstraction that we call knowledge is that simplified form. Have we become really good at abstracts? Arguably, yes. Does that mean we have the mental capacity to handle every possible computational form in nature in its full (not simplified) capacity? Of course not.
Mar
25
comment Is Computer Science a “solvable” field?
The theory being the pedantic knowledge (and often broad over arching theorems that abstract away the complexity) and the practical application being the knowledge gained by experience in deploying that theory in real life (where the theorems alone are often proven insufficient on their own). The limits aren't on the knowledge itself but on our willingness to accept that there is complexity beyond our understanding (and therefore more to discover).