4,106 reputation
11023
bio website code.google.com/p/…
location San Diego, CA
age 30
visits member for 4 years
seen Aug 4 at 20:18

I'm passionate about coding and researching the history of technology as well as exploring where technology is leading.

I used to work in flight simulation doing both hardware implementation (electrical design, wiring), web development (design, development, webmaster), as well as software development (desktop development in C#).

I'm a big fan of both using and contributing to Open source projects.

I am the creator of the pypreprocessor library that can be found on PYPI as well as Google code.


Feb
18
comment How to manage accidental complexity in software projects
@CortAmmon Not to be mean but that sounds like a pretty dumb insight. 99% of what developers know was learned at some point through your so-called 'on-the-fly growth'. It takes a good problem solver to make a good programmer. Solving problems is something we're inherently drawn to. If your developers are't growing they're probably doing a lot of boring repetitive work. The type of work that will make any reasonably talented developers unhappy and depressed. And... 'Spiral Development' is nothing but a re-hashing of the basic concept of iterative development with waterfall milestones.
Feb
18
revised Difference between an architecture and a framework
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Feb
18
revised Difference between an architecture and a framework
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Feb
18
answered Difference between an architecture and a framework
Jan
28
comment Is there a canonical book on mathematics for programmers?
+100 KhanAcademy is great for strengthening math foundations. There's nothing wrong with starting from the basics. The self-paced learning removes the 'humiliation factor' of not knowing some of the simple math fundamentals. The assessment system does a good job identifying weaknesses and quickly moving beyond weaknesses.
Jan
28
comment Is there a canonical book on mathematics for programmers?
The only problem with trying to 'learn' math using project Euler is, a lot of optimal answers are based on well known algorithms learned in higher-level math courses. For instance, anything that involves calculating primes can be optimized using an Eratosthenes Sieve. It's great for discovering new algorithms and thinking about managing complexity but not very useful for foundational math.
Nov
6
comment Getting humiliated by your senior programmer
+1 Ding ding ding. Grow a thicker skin and make twice the effort on the next go around. In engineering, respect is earned not given. This guy was probably just sore after some 'brilliant' idea of his was shut down by the senior staff.
Oct
22
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
22
comment Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
@c69 Edge cases are illustrated here tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4180.
Oct
22
revised Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
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Oct
22
comment Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
@9000 See my answer. I used to think the same and invested a lot of time in trying to prove so but -- in the end -- chose an alternative approach. If CSV was strictly a machine-readable format with a very concise context-free format it would be completely do-able with regex alone. In practice, CSV is used as a human-readable format with a lot of (completely valid and acceptable) quirks.
Oct
22
comment Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
@SpencerRathbun Yep. I'm sure I've taken a look at the node-csv source before. It appears to use a typical character tokenization state machine for processing. The jquery-csv parser works on the same fundamental concept except I use regex for terminal/non-terminal tokenization. Instead of evaluating and concatenating on a char-by-char basis, regex is able to match multiple non-terminal characters at a time and return them as a group (ie string). This minimizes unnecessary concatenation and 'should' increase efficiency.
Oct
22
revised Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
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Oct
21
comment REST partial bad request
@Kenneth If you want to prevent having to re-send a lot of data, why not just break upload down into a one-image-per-request pattern. That way you can have the status be updated on the client for every image that's successfully loaded and give the user the option to re-send the ones that didn't make it.
Oct
21
answered Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
Oct
21
comment Can the csv format be defined by a regex?
How about a line containing a trailing empty non-terminal, a line containing an escaped newline char(s), multiple variations of newline chars (ie \r, \n \r\n), etc... There is a common standard for CSV data but it's not possible to parse using regular expressions alone. Even if it was, the implementation would be extremely inefficient.
Oct
21
comment Class Design — Multiple Calls from One Method or One Call from Multiple Methods?
Not an answer but a simple tip. If you're going to create a class that extends one of the generic collection classes add the IEnumerable interface to your class and take some time to implement the required methods. That way you'll be able to iterate over your custom collection in a standard/predictable fashion (ex using foreach).
Oct
21
revised Class Design — Multiple Calls from One Method or One Call from Multiple Methods?
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Oct
21
revised Class Design — Multiple Calls from One Method or One Call from Multiple Methods?
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Oct
21
comment Class Design — Multiple Calls from One Method or One Call from Multiple Methods?
@Lucas The names used are purely subjective. The point is, the helper methods will never be exposed publicly -- as in they will never be used outside the class definition -- so the naming scheme only needs to make sense to the developer(s) implementing the class. The simple rule being, don't obsess too much over naming/structure when it comes to code private/helper code.