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May
14
comment Merging around 15 small Git repos of non-optional centralized web service components to a single large repo
Good question, but the answer may differ based on the IDE integration into source control, so can you give a bit more info on tools used.
May
7
reviewed Close Utility Functions Best Practices
May
7
reviewed Leave Open Why is studying an lisp interpreter in lisp so important?
May
7
reviewed Close How do you explain the complexity of bulk emailing to a manager?
May
7
reviewed Close Debugger for file I/O development?
May
7
reviewed Leave Open How do I explain to non-programers what .NET is?
May
7
reviewed Close Are there areas where TDD provides a high ROI and other areas where the ROI is so low that it is not worth following?
Apr
30
reviewed Close How do you handle your Project Manager
Apr
30
reviewed Close UML class diagram - instantiation dependency relationship: who depends on who?
Apr
29
comment Git: Branch or Fork?
Fork is a github concept, not a git concept. It simply clones and puts it in your account. So cloning is what you're looking for. See stackoverflow.com/questions/6286571/git-fork-is-git-clone
Apr
29
comment Backbone and JavaScript
It's very unclear what problem you're trying to solve here.
Apr
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
comment Testing in procedural programming code
@user2250119: perl.org/get.html
Apr
23
answered Testing in procedural programming code
Apr
15
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
Yeah, that's one of those cost-benefit decisions you have to make sometimes. I would test both, doing whatever I could to remove duplication from the test code. I don't know C++ testing frameworks very well, but in NUnit, you can have base test classes from which you can derive others, so you can very easily say "all classes that derive from type A must satisfy these conditions". Then if, later, that becomes untrue -- eg. if the implementation is moved to the derived classes -- you can also move the test to the derived test classes and run before changing your code.
Apr
14
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
@MetaFight: Correct.
Apr
14
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
@MetaFight: No, I'm not suggesting that. I'm suggesting that if I call DoStuff() on a derived class, the expected behaviour (which is what I should be testing) is a behaviour of that derived class, even if it is ENTIRELY implemented in the base class. I am distinguishing between behaviour and implementation details. That is, if I decide later that DoStuff() should be implemented in the derived class, or a helper class, instead then the behaviour of that class doesn't change (though other derived classes might) and neither should the tests.
Apr
14
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
Behaviour shouldn't belong to an abstract superclass though. That's the point of its being abstract, surely. The behaviour is a property of the subclass; that it has a superclass is an implementation detail.
Apr
14
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
And all that is assuming you've actually considered and discounted preferring composition over inheritance. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance
Apr
14
comment Testing abstract class' behavior
How does instantiating an object of the subclass make the tests confusing? In most cases, your tests shouldn't even know there is a superclass; the only thing that matters is the subclass. In the few cases where you really want to test an abstract superclass, the first option is preferable.