254 reputation
15
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location Reading, United Kingdom
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Dec 5 at 19:41

Dec
13
answered How assertive should I be in handling exceptions in objects?
Nov
6
awarded  Commentator
Nov
6
comment Why can't we get anything done?
That's what I've been trying to communicate for some time. As it happens, the prototypes are often valuable and do teach us essential lessons about the nature of the problem. However, whether or not those lessons are learned are left to chance, and the quality of the implementation relies on the developer reconstituting the acquired knowledge from their brain, rather than using the prototype to write the spec. The lead dev says the latter should happen, then doesn't follow through on ensuring that it does.
Nov
6
comment Why can't we get anything done?
Quite right. Unfortunately you may be obliging me to admit something that I didn't want to - that we have a lack of competence. It's evident generally, but particularly with the modellers. For some aspects we do insist on firm specifications, then it still ends up wrong. They're scientists, and speaking from experience, scientists tend to treat code like an experiment - correct errors as you go along. For the business this simply isn't good enough and it's a matter of professionalism to be expected to recognise this.
Nov
6
comment Why can't we get anything done?
To continue; Iterative development is the name of the game, you've got that right. Trouble is, the iteration peters out before it's actually finished because we get vague platitudes from the modellers about whether or not what we've coded is really correct. Nobody can identify any errors, so what we've done ships. Six months later it turns out to be wrong. I'd like to be able to point out that the modellers need to be given firmer criteria to test against, but then again, isn't it their job to say so?
Nov
6
comment Why can't we get anything done?
@Robert Harvey - It's difficult for me to judge. The products are extremely niche, and we (developers) get mixed messages. On the one side, new customers in breakthrough markets are thrashing the product more than we originally envisaged and finding faults as a consequence, which they don't seem to mind since we explain why and fix them quickly. On the other hand, some large institutional customers are distrustful and we're starting to take flak for repeatedly amending the model. The software team is one of the few breaking even in the company at present, so we look good at the moment.
Nov
6
awarded  Student
Nov
6
asked Why can't we get anything done?
Oct
13
comment How would you decline to have your name put on a software patent?
Somebody has missed the point of my answer, even though I made it quite clear. I was voicing what I perceive to be the opinion of patent lawyers and advocates of the patent system.
Sep
22
answered How would you decline to have your name put on a software patent?
Sep
22
comment Is OOP hard because it is not natural?
@zvrba: My answer to the question posed in the comment is that it doesn't matter. Everything that has a name and a surname is a person to every program that only cares about people. For any program that has no knowledge of people or non-people, it's an IHasNameAndSurname. Objects only need to solve the problem at hand.
Sep
22
answered Is OOP hard because it is not natural?
Sep
22
answered How baby are your baby-steps in TDD?
Sep
22
comment How baby are your baby-steps in TDD?
Marked as a Good Question for stimulating debate.
Sep
21
answered How do I move a client from UI mockups to a set of real requirements?
Aug
25
answered Thoughts on Development using Virtual Machines
Aug
20
comment Why are data structures so important in interviews?
I'm going to present an opinion here that's likely to be controversial. The question of why one data structure or another tends to be down to efficiency and performance. What do we tell developers not to do? No optimising prematurely! Unless you know by profiling that the choice of data structure is causing performance problems, the 'right' one to pick is the one you're most familiar with. Any other decision is premature optimisation, and therefore evil!
May
8
awarded  Supporter
Apr
25
answered Are design patterns really essential nowadays?
Feb
24
answered If you were the manager of a team of 25 developers, how would you motivate them?