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Feb
11
comment Why did BASIC use line numbers?
@DerMike: "obvious" is a dangerous words. It always relates to exactly one person on the world, if at all (person may die). To me, there is no obviousness of your research at all.
Feb
9
comment Encrypted content in games
@Christer: Personally, I switched from "I wish they read my question a bit better" to "I wish I would have communicated my question better". It's less arrogant/ignorant and flexes your mind in the positive sense in the mid-term.
Jan
28
comment What's the point of running unit tests on a CI server?
@RobbieDee: ... but booting them before every single commit would be a catastrophe in salary terms.
Jan
28
comment What's the point of running unit tests on a CI server?
@RobbieDee: I have often written Unit Tests that were specific to a certain compiler on a certain platform. Consider e.g. a graphics subsystem that makes use of AMD (the Intel competitor) specific CPU instructions which are only available on g++ (the GNU C++ compiler) version 4.5 or newer, but I happen to work on a Atom CPU and ICC (the Intel C++ Compiler). It would be nonsense to run the AMD/g++4.5-tests everytime on that machine, yet it is code to be tested before release; plus my own CPU-independent code must be tested for proper interoperability. Sure, there are VMs and emulators, ...
Dec
15
comment How should I remember what I was doing and why on a project three months back?
... Of course, whether the code is the architecture depends on the magnitude of "architecture", is it a heavily distributed telcom network, or just a closed system to create artificial flora for games? Where does "architecture" for our team begin? What is the degree of abstraction of "architecture"? And so on.
Dec
15
comment How should I remember what I was doing and why on a project three months back?
@JensG: I recognize your point. I think we are just interpreting "I realize that I do not remember what exactly I was doing" differently. To me this sounded more like "I realize that I do not remember which algorithms and data-structures I coded and how I can extend them", to you, it was (I guess) more like "I realize that I do not remember what exactly I was trying to implement and the target thereof". Ambiguous human language. ...
Dec
15
comment How should I remember what I was doing and why on a project three months back?
... reading or writing a book: Is it gibberish with a Flesch-Kincaid readability index of 10, with huge phrases, a lot of complicated word-constructs, letting the reader focus on syntax instead of semantics, or is it easy to read with an index of about 80, and so not being in the way of the story itself.
Dec
15
comment How should I remember what I was doing and why on a project three months back?
@JensG: Code is the architecture. In a well written program, I can see the top of the program-architecture in function main, which for a significantly sized program will be rather abstract. I can then dive deeper, and see the architecture of how the program cleans up itself, for example. Further, clean code means that functions/variables/etc. have names that make sense and make a statement about their meaning. If I, instead, write Spaghetti/Write-Only-code, I will often wake up the next morning/month/year, look at my code, and the only thought will be wtf-did-i-do-there. It's the same when..
Nov
4
comment Why is Math.Sqrt() a static function?
@RichardTingle: Principally, a language could be designed to allow for extension methods, which are still free functions, but called like they would be members (e.g. C# has them). Personally, I dislike them, as they make for highly non-maintainable networks of code.
Oct
29
comment Why is the minus sign, '-', generally not overloaded in the same way as the plus sign?
@gashach: Being the counterpart of the + operator, the trailing would be removed.
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
19
comment how to refactor many singletons
@MarkAmery: Yes, there's no definition of "small", "medium" and "large". And there is not really a meaning in "lines of code". Anyways, personally, I can write decent code at a pace of 1000-10000 lines on a single weekend. How many weekends is "medium", how many weekends is "large"? If the Kernel Linux is large with about 10MLoC, does "medium" become 0.5MLoC+? I don't really know. But I don't think a program worth 200 EUR in pure working hours is medium; I could buy many medium-sized programs and full rights each month, then. But that's just my opinion.
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Oct
14
comment how to refactor many singletons
5000 lines is not really much, even in Python. I would call it "small", actually. I love small programs, so there's nothing wrong with that. Anyways: Ask yourself which effort is higher: Refactoring or Rewriting?
Oct
14
answered Is it normal to spend as much, if not more, time writing tests than actual code?
Oct
5
comment Should I stop using the term C/C++?
Your answer would be better without "There has to be a reason why these terms come together so often.". Facts as a substitute for reasoning would lead to flat earths.
Sep
7
comment Why are there no package management systems for C and C++?
@DanielLittle: .NET is only a tiny fraction of the C and C++ folk, tho.
Sep
7
comment DRY unrelated, but nearly identical, code
Refactoring imposes many compromises and sometimes even paradoxons. E.g. w.r.t. loose coupling vs. DRY, or short functions, but many thereof, vs. longer functions, and few thereof. In the end, it's a difficult beast: Your target is readability and maintainability. You need to think as an avatar that sees your code for the first time. And sometimes you just try out to see what's better. Perfect refactoring unfortunately is not possible.
Sep
7
comment What's the use of .Any() in a C# List<>?
@JacquesB: Personally, I associate any/none/all with checking for a condition on a list, but not with the meaning of "has any". Probably because there is no symmetry between "list.empty"=="list is empty", and "list.any"=="list has any". Whereas upon a list, it reads "if any true in list", "if none true in list", "if all true in list". I guess it's that symmetry that makes it less intuitive to me. Personally, while I find it uglier, but I think I would prefer if they'd just stick to "list.hasXXX", "list.isXXX" naming convention, looks less leet, but is less ambiguous.
Sep
5
comment What's the use of .Any() in a C# List<>?
In some regards, these functions are not well-named. In C++, it would have been if (!list.empty()), which seems more related to a list being empty or not. While I am not usually into negating things, list not empty is clearer to me than list any. Surely, if you insert a list _has_ any, it's clearer. But then, Any also has other meanings, e.g. "any true", and you have to put it in mentally, already knowing what "Any" does.