6,541 reputation
32129
bio website softwareonastring.com
location Netherlands
age 52
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Nov 22 at 18:59

Software developer since 1985. Started in Cobol, moved via Clipper/VB to Delphi. Delphi developer since 1998. Sniffing at C# and playing around with javascript and some php for websites. Coaching new employees and less experienced developers. Focused on software architecture and SOLID design. Keenly interested in user experience and usability.

Questions

When you ask a question, show your effort, provide all the details that will help someone to help you and be precise.

Answers

When you answer a question, don't just paste your code. Your answers will be much better when you explain why your code is doing what it does and how it achieves the asker's goal. It makes it a whole lot easier to follow along. As it is I am much more inclined to up-vote answers that have explanatory text about what the code is doing and why it is written as it is.

Answers that just contain links aren't likely to get an up-vote from me either

Other

Obligatory link whenever someone thinks they are improving security by imposing all sorts of rules on password composition: Password strength


May
20
answered What to do as a Dev when for years their team has lacked product innovation, not used project mgmt methodologies, and kept bad Software Dev practices?
May
20
comment What to do as a Dev when for years their team has lacked product innovation, not used project mgmt methodologies, and kept bad Software Dev practices?
Is your manager a development manager or the product manager ie the one who decides on the priority of items to be developed based on the business value they represent?
May
20
comment Production or Custom Test Data for Unit Testing?
Yeah, you would think so. Unfortunately, in my all too painful experience not everybody has that common sense. And then you discover that while your backups were made every day, nobody ever bothered to check whether the restore also did what it was supposed to...
May
19
comment Keeping agile with zero-bug/defect policy
Yep, though you do have to ensure that prioritization is done on proper grounds (business value) and does not use the "origin" (feature request versus test report versus bug reported from the field) as a "sorting" criterium where feature requests always come before ...
May
19
comment Production or Custom Test Data for Unit Testing?
I do hope you mean copies of production files?
May
18
comment Web applications have “the todo list.” What analogous program is there for systems programming?
Thanks for the link to the "TodoMVC" site. Great resource!
May
18
comment design strategy pattern with null checking
+1 I feel the "null object pattern" is a misnomer. It should have been named the NOP Pattern. NOP standing for NO oPeration as in the NOP assembly instruction.
May
18
comment Re-architecting a classic inheritance design
+1 Though you don't need to use an IOC container to achieve the benefits dependency injection. Nice read: Inversion of Control Containers and the Dependency Injection pattern
May
15
comment Is it poor programming practice to pass parameters as Objects?
@Jonathan: Aha! Another reason not even to contemplate eating fish... :-)
May
15
comment Is it poor programming practice to pass parameters as Objects?
@MichaelBlackburn: ??? I don't understand that comment ??? What's so special about microwaving fish curry? Googling for it I only get interesting (if you like fish) recipe's and even video's.
May
12
comment How much poor quality code should a junior put up with?
Low quality code is a great learning opportunity even without a mentor. Figure out what it is that makes it poor. Keep questioning you theories on that. Try (at home) to improve the code. Figure out how you would tackle implementing the functionality in a more OOP, robust, maintainable, ... way if you could start from scratch. Find different ways to do so. Learn from the experience.
May
11
comment What is the benefit of the MoSCoW technique?
We changed "Would" to "Won't". That made it a lot clearer. More importantly though, using MoSCoW instead of some numbering system, makes it much easier to know what each priority stands for. After all, the priority name actually signals the priority. With numbers, the relative importance may be easier to spot, but you always have to do some translation to get at the meaning of the number/priority.
May
8
comment Please tell me I'm not alone (can't program on paper)
Good on you! Practice makes perfect. Try and get into more interviews. I used to make a habit of applying and interviewing even when I was pretty happy where I was. I did pick only jobs I was genuinely interested in, because I didn't want to waste anybody's time. Being happy where I was meant there wasn't too much pressure to get everything right to get the job, so I could be more relaxed (and do better as a result) and if I did bodge an interview I could chalk it up to "experience gained".
May
8
comment What are the disadvantages of using stored procedures, SSIS, and SSRS to implement business applications?
I see a cyclic argument here. Paraphrasing: "Moving to a different database would be a very large project and would be rare, so go ahead and put everything in the database". But putting everything in the database makes changing database vendors a large project and thus doesn't happen very often. Chicken and egg come to mind. The less logic you have in the database, the less of an issue moving vendors is, the more it (could and would) happen... (On top of that you have the issue of using database specific features for your business logic, increasing the scope of any project to change...)
May
4
answered The need for adding an interface to every class
May
4
comment Is there a name for the school of thought behind writing tests?
@JörgWMittag: you are wrong. You cannot, by its very definition, have test driven design without test driven development based on unit tests and all other automated tests built on top of that foundation.
May
4
comment Is there a name for the school of thought behind writing tests?
@Giorgio: Yes, you can have unit test without doing anything else, but not the other way around. TDD (Test Driven Design) is built on TDD (Test Driven Development) and Test Driven Development cannot work without unit tests.
May
4
comment Is there a name for the school of thought behind writing tests?
Please remember that TDD can stand both for Test Driven Design as well as for Test Driven Development. I took it as the latter... And as Robert says TDD and unit testing are in now way orthogonal.
May
4
comment Please tell me I'm not alone (can't program on paper)
Did you tell them how you felt doing the test? That you knew what was wrong, but couldn't think of the fix because the situation they put you in (graphite marks on paper) made you extremely nervous (something which tends to feed on itself). I participate in job interviews as an interviewer and evaluate candidates' test results. When someone bodges a test or does less well than expected, knowing what was going on with that person helps to assess how that would affect performance given that we know a lot more about they day to day goings on.
May
4
comment Is there a name for the school of thought behind writing tests?
No they were not. Unit testing was around before Agile was. Unit testing is the safety net you need to do any refactoring with confidence, whether you work in an Agile manner or not. Because Agile advocates YAGNI it also means you do a lot of refactoring when it turns out you do need something and you need to change your design for that. As a result Agile is a great proponent of unit testing, but that's all, they certainly didn't introduce it.